Research Groups

Dr. Roi Avraham

HOST-PATHOGEN INTERACTIONS

The lab of host-pathogen genomics is interested in how individual encounters between host and pathogenic bacteria can ultimately define the outcome of infection. This is achieved by applying cross-disciplinary single-cell analysis platforms that collectively enable us to extensively profile and precisely monitor host-pathogen interactions within the context of in vivo infections.

Dr. Shelly Hen Avivi

Research associates

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Dr. Noa Ben-Moshe

Postdocs

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Dotan Hoffman

PhD Students

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Gili Rosenberg

PhD Students

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Aryeh Solomon

PhD Students

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Dror Yehezkel

Scientific staff

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Dr. Ayelet Erez

The Erez group focuses on deciphering metabolic changes that either accompany or cause different disease states, as cancer. More specifically, by dissecting the role and contribution of the urea cycle enzymes and metabolites to specific cellular and systemic phenotypes, we gain insights to the metabolic rewiring that complements specific disease pathogenesis. The metabolic analysis is performed with unique equipment including gas chromatography mass spectrometry which allows tracking of dynamic fluxes between different metabolic pathways. Using in vitro and in vivo techniques, we combine basic molecular methods with genetic mouse models and human patients to reveal metabolic aberrations that occur in the course of human diseases for translational therapeutic relevance. Positions available for PhD students

Dr. Ram Mazkereth

Consultant

Rotem Katzir

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Prof. Atan Gross

The Many Faces of Mitochondria

Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that play fundamental roles in pivotal cellular processes including energy production/metabolism, calcium homeostasis, and apoptosis. In our lab we are specifically interested in understanding how these different mitochondrial processes are regulated/coordinated to determine the fate of our cells. Many of our studies are focused on a novel mitochondrial protein named MTCH2 that acts as a receptor for the pro-apoptotic BID protein. Interestingly, conditional knockout of MTCH2 in several different mouse tissues results in significant alterations to mitochondria function and structure leading to changes in cell fate and disease outcome. A better understanding of MTCH2’s mechanism of action will likely uncover hidden connections between the many functions of mitochondria.
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Prof. Ami Navon

The regulated degradation of proteins within eukaryotic cells is considered to be catalyzed primarily by the ubiquitin – proteasome system. In this system, substrates are targeted for proteasomal degradation by covalent ligation to ubiquitin, in a multi-step process, which requires a sequential action of three enzymes (E1, E2, E3). The 26S proteasome is composed of two major sub-complexes, the 20S catalytic core and the 19S regulatory particle. The 26S proteasome plays an important role in the generation of peptides suitable for binding and presentation by Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules. The other major cellular recycling pathway, macroautophagy, is responsible for nonspecific bulk degradation of cytoplasmatic components and damaged or excess organelles. A fraction of the lysosomal degradation products are loaded on MHC class II molecules in the endocytic compartment. These two degradation pathways are responsible for the generation of peptides suitable for binding to MHC molecules. On the cell surface the peptide-MHC complex is surveyed by epitope-specific T cell receptors, carried on T lymphocytes; this specific recognition triggers the activation of the immune response.

Dr. Ariel Stanhill

Consultant

Michal Arie

PhD Students

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Rotem Karmona

PhD Students

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Daria Riabov Bassat

PhD Students

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Prof. Michal Neeman

The vascular bed is essential for survival of all multicellular organisms that are larger than a millimeter. Accordingly, all changes in the structure and function of tissues, which occur in health and disease, during development or degeneration, are accompanied and often induced by vascular changes. The aim of our work is to map the regulatory network controlling the growth and function of blood and lymphatic vessels. Novel MRI tools, accompanied by advanced optical modalities, allow us to non-invasively obtain dynamic information on activity of multiple steps in the angiogenic process and thereby improves our understanding of the key regulatory elements and critical checkpoints of vascular remodeling. Identifications of these checkpoints can be used as targets for intervention, and assist in pre-clinical and clinical development of such novel targeted therapies

Dr. Michael Holzinger

Consultant

Dr. Shlomi Lazar

Consultant

Karin Levav

Scientific staff

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Prof. Irit Sagi

Research subtitle

While most biological research focuses on what goes on inside the cell, we look at what is happening outside. Our lab studies the cellular microenvironment, which includes the extracellular matrix (ECM) - a collection of secreted molecules that provides structural and biochemical support. We have found that dysregulated ECM remodeling enzymes (MMPs, ADAMs, LOX) can induce morphological changes that affect cellular behavior. This provides us with significant opportunities to influence various cellular processes by controlling the activity of these enzymes in health and disease. To this end, our group develops selective inhibitors and uses novel tools to study ECM functional remodeling. Our desire is to unravel key molecular mechanisms by directly observing ECM remodeling in different animal models on multiple scales. The mechanistic insights derived from our integrated multidisciplinary research enable us to design new therapeutic and diagnostic tools, some of which are currently being developed for clinical uses.

Dr. Inna Solomonov

Staff Scientists

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Dr. Nikolaos Afratis

Postdocs

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Dr. Amit Benbenishty

Postdocs

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Dr. Venkat Raghavan Krishnaswamy

Postdocs

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Idan Adir

PhD Students

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Tamar Gross

PhD Students

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Maxim Levin

PhD Students

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Vishnu Mohan

PhD Students

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Elee Shimshoni

PhD Students

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Prof. Rony Seger

Intracellular signaling pathways in health and disease

Extracellular signals are transferred from the membranes to the genes in the nucleus via several communication lines known as intracellular signaling pathways. We are studying the regulation of some of these pathways, and concentrate mainly on the subcellular localisation of their components. We recently showed that shuttling of one signaling component to the Golgi is important for the induction of mitotic Golgi fragmentation. Most importantly, we also identified the mechanisms of nuclear translocation of other components and showed that their prevention  serve as  a potent way to prevent cancer and inflammatory diseases. More studies on the mechanism that govern the regulation of localisation may lead to the development of therapeutic drug for these and other diseases.

Dr. Suresh Singh Yadav

Postdocs

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Ehud Wainstein

PhD Students

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Dr. Efrat Shema

Epigenetics in cancer and development

We study epigenetic events that contribute to cellular differentiation, early development and cancer. To address these fundamental questions, we develop and apply innovative cutting-edge single-molecule technologies. We strive to gain deeper understanding of chromatin regulation, as well as the develop novel therapeutic and diagnostic tools.

Dr. Nofar Harpaz

Research associates

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Dr. Noa Furth

Postdocs

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Vadim Fedyuk

PhD Students

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Prof. Amos Tanay

Genome and epigenome regulation

The Tanay group is developing new strategies for understanding genome and epigenome regulation in heterogeneous cell populations. This is done by combining single cell genomics approaches, techniques for studying chromosomal conformations, and data-driven models for quantitative gene regulation. The group is particularly interested in applying such techniques to understand the evolution of tumor heterogeneity and how it affects cancer biology and treatment.
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Dr. Igor Ulitsky

Functions and modes of action of long noncoding RNAs in mammalian cells during development and regeneration

Protein-coding DNA sequences account for less than 2% of the human genome. Recent studies found that the long stretches of DNA located between the protein-coding genes are pervasively transcribed into different classes of RNA molecules including long non-coding RNAs, or lncRNAs. Our lab takes an interdisciplinary approach that combines experimental and computational tools to study the functions of these RNAs, the principles that dictate their mode of action, and the consequences of their disruption in human disease. We study lncRNAs in variety of experimental systems, including pluripotent stem cells, cancer cell lines, and mouse models.

Dr. Miriam Rosenberg

Consultant

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Prof. Karina Yaniv

The Yaniv Lab, focuses on understanding the mechanisms controlling blood and lymphatic vessel formation during embryonic development and pathological conditions. Above 20 million people die every year from CVDs, representing 30 percent of all global deaths. Today it is widely accepted that many of the genes activated during pathological angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis are the same ones that play major roles in developmental vessel formation. Therefore, studies as those carried out in our laboratory have tremendous potential clinical relevance, and may unearth novel medically useful molecules.

Dr. Yael Kenig Koslovsky

Consultant

Dr. Ivan Bassi

Postdocs

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Prof. Yosef Yarden

Growth factors and their receptors in cancer

Growth factors and their transmembrane receptors contribute to all steps of tumor progression, from the initial phase of clonal expansion, through angiogenesis to metastasis. Hence, the information relay system involved in growth factor signaling provides potential sites for signal interception and tumor inhibition.

Dr. Alex Starr

Consultant

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Dr. Irit Granot

Consultant

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