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Lectures & Events

Monday 07 January
Perlman Chemical Sciences Building 11:00
Chemical and Biological Physics Guest Seminar Prof. Steve Pressé [Info]

Chemical and Biological Physics Guest Seminar

Monitoring life in action—as it occurs in real time within the cellular cytoplasm at the relevant single molecule scale—remains an important challenge. In order to see life unravel and monitor specific biomolecules as they diffuse and assemble in the cytoplasm, we create contrast with the cellular background by fluorescently labeling biomolecules. Yet the diffraction limit of light naively keeps us from peering into length scales comparable to those of single molecules. For this reason, the 2014 Chemistry Nobel Prize was awarded for separating signals from particles in time that cannot otherwise be separated in space to localize biomolecular structures to a precision beyond the diffraction limit. However, this process is slow and thus we compromise temporal resolution by separating signal in time. Here we present new Mathematics that make it possible to consider complex dynamical signals from which we can build a story of life in action starting from single, or very few, photons. The methods we present—motivated by the tools of Bayesian nonparametrics—show us how to achieve diffraction-limited tracking from signal previously considered insufficient. If time allows, we will discuss extensions of our methods to inferring diffusional dynamics from single photon arrivals from confocal imaging methods Dept of Physics, Arizona State University
Monday 21 January
Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium 11:00
"Molecular electronics as a playground for nanoscale thermal transport" Prof. Juan Carlos Cuevas [Info]

"Molecular electronics as a playground for nanoscale thermal transport"

Abstract With the advent of novel fabrication techniques in the 1980s and 1990s, it became possible to explore many physical phenomena at the nanoscale. Since then, a lot of progress has been done in the understanding of the electronic transport, mechanical, and optical properties of nanoscale devices. However, thermal transport in these systems has remained relatively unexplored because of the experimental difficulty to measure the flow of heat and energy at this small scale. In this talk, I will review our theoretical and experimental efforts to establish the fundamental laws that govern nanoscale thermal transport by using atomic and molecular junctions as a playground. In particular, I will discuss basic phenomena such as Joule heating and Peltier cooling in molecular junctions [1,2] and quantized thermal transport in atomic-size contacts [3]. References [1] W. Lee, K. Kim, W. Jeong, L.A. Zotti, F. Pauly, J.C. Cuevas, P. Reddy, Nature 498, 209 (2013). [2] L. Cui, R. Miao, K. Wang, D. Thompson, L.A. Zotti, J.C. Cuevas, E. Meyhofer, P. Reddy, Nature Nanotechnology 13, 122 (2018). [3] L. Cui, W. Jeong, S. Hur, M. Matt, J.C Klöckner, F. Pauly, J.C. Cuevas, E. Meyhofer, P. Reddy, Science 355, 1192 (2017). Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics Department, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain
Monday 04 February
Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium 11:00
Chemistry Colloquium Prof. Stephen L. Buchwald [Info]

Chemistry Colloquium

MIT
Monday 11 February
Camelia Botnar Building 11:00
Chemistry Colloquium Prof. Serdar Sariciftci [Info]

Chemistry Colloquium

Linz-Organic Photovoltaic Cells institute in thy Johannes Kepler University of Linz
Monday 25 February
Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium 11:00
Chemistry colloquium Prof. Dek Woolfson [Info]

Chemistry colloquium

University of Bristol
Monday 11 March
Camelia Botnar Building 11:00
Chemistry colloquium Prof. Myongsoo Lee [Info]

Chemistry colloquium

Jilin University
Monday 18 March
Camelia Botnar Building 11:00
Chemistry colloquium Prof. Lei Jiang [Info]

Chemistry colloquium

Beihang University
Monday 15 April
Camelia Botnar Building 11:00
Chemistry Colloquium Prof. Jan Schroers [Info]

Chemistry Colloquium

Yale University