Webinars

Quicktabs - Webinars

    Past webinars for All years

  • M2C2 2021 webinar: #3 The Kubanek lab

    Date: Wednesday, April 7, 2021
    Hour: 9:00 - 11:00 EST 15:00 - 17:00 CET 16:00 - 18:00 IL
    About the lab

    All organisms use chemicals to assess their environment and to communicate with others. Chemical cues for defense, mating, habitat selection, and food tracking are crucial, widespread, and structurally and functionally diverse. Yet our knowledge of chemical signaling is patchy, especially in marine environments. In our research we ask, “How do marine organisms use chemicals to solve critical problems of competition, disease, predation, and reproduction?” Our group uses an integrated approach to understand how chemical cues function in ecological interactions, working from molecular to community levels. We also use ecological insights to guide discovery of novel pharmaceuticals and molecular probes

    Speakers

    Kubanek group overview

    Julia Kubanek, PI

    Georgia Tech, USA

    Predator cues target signaling pathways in toxic algal metabolome

    Emily Brown, PhD student

    Georgia Tech, USA

    Cryptic chemical variation in marine algae as revealed by untargeted metabolomics

    Bhuwan Chhetri, PhD student

    Georgia Tech, USA

    Marine bacteria derived pesticides to protect microalgal biofuel crops

    Marisa Cepeda, PhD student

    Georgia Tech, USA

  • M2C2 2021 webinar: #2 The Pohnert lab

    Date: Wednesday, March 3, 2021
    Hour: 9:00 - 11:00 EST 15:00 - 17:00 CET 16:00 - 18:00 IL
    About the lab

    The Pohnert group elucidates new chemical defence- and communication strategies of marine algae using the tools of modern bioorganic chemistry. We seek to understand the chemical language spoken between organisms. In the aquatic environment we focus on the language of algae that release molecules into the water in order to communicate with each other, to interact with microorganisms or to defend themselves. Our work aims to understand the role of chemical compounds as mediators of ecological interactions of entire communities. Isolation, spectroscopy and organic synthesis of natural products are important aspects of our work, but we believe that the full picture of the role of the compounds can only be obtained if biochemistry and ecology are brought in as well. We also develop new methods based on metabolomics techniques (i.e. the monitoring of all metabolites released by a given organisms) to understand chemically mediated processes in communities. Our interdisciplinary work gives new insights into the chemically mediated species interactions and the function of natural products.

    Speakers

    The metabolic marketplace in the sea

    Georg Pohnert, PI

    Friedrich-Schiller Universität Jena, Germany

    Phytoplankton community interactions: from population to single-cell studies

    Marine Vallet, Postdoctoral researcher

    Friedrich-Schiller Universität Jena, Germany

    Bacteria-macroalgae interaction: Role of dimethylsulfoniopropionate and thallusin in bacterial attraction and morphogenesis of Ulva (Chlorophyta)

    Thomas Wichard, Research group leader

    Friedrich-Schiller Universität Jena, Germany

  • M2C2 2021 webinar: #1 The Vardi lab on chemical signalling during host-pathogen interactions at sea

    Date: Wednesday, February 3, 2021
    Hour: 9:00 - 11:00 EST 15:00 - 17:00 CET 16:00 - 18:00 IL
    About the lab

    Marine photosynthetic microorganisms (phytoplankton) are the basis of marine food webs. Despite the fact that their biomass represents only about 0.2% of the photosynthetic biomass on earth, they are responsible for nearly 50% of the global annual photosynthesis, and greatly influence global biogeochemical cycles. They can form massive oceanic blooms that stretch over thousands of kilometres and can be detected by satellites. They are regulated by environmental factors such as abiotic stress (nutrient availability, light regime) and biotic interactions with grazers and viruses.

    Despite the huge importance of marine algae, relatively little is known about the molecular basis for their ecological success. We are interested in understanding the cellular mechanisms that govern the response of phytoplankton to microbial interactions with pathogens (viruses, bacteria) and grazers that control the fate of these blooms from the micro to the macro scales.

    Our work aims at elucidating the cell signalling pathways that regulate cell fate decisions and uncover the chemical signals (infochemicals) involved in the complex microbial interactions in the oceans.

    Speakers

    Vardi lab overview

    Assaf Vardi, PI

    Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel

    Host-virus interactions through the metabolomics lens

    Constanze Kuhlisch, Postdoctoral researcher

    Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel

    Behavioral switch in bacteria in response to algal metabolites

    Noa Barak-Gavish, Postdoctoral researcher

    Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel

    The role of dimethyl sulfide as an eat-me signal during microbial predator-prey interactions

    Adva Shemi, Postdoctoral researcher

    Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel