Lectures and Events - Department of Materials and Interfaces

Upcoming Lectures

  • January26

    11:00 AM

    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building

    Room 404

    Soft Matter and Biomaterials

    Mechanical interaction between cells in fibrous environments

    Dr. Ayelet Lesman

    Tissues are made up of cells and an extracellular matrix (ECM), a cross-linked network of fibers that exhibits complex...

    Tissues are made up of cells and an extracellular matrix (ECM), a cross-linked network of fibers that exhibits complex mechanics. Cells actively alter the ECM structure and mechanics by applying contractile forces. These forces can propagate far into the matrix and allow for remote cellular sensing. We study experimentally and computationally how cell-generated forces are transmitted in fibrous environments, the associated physical mechanisms, and the ability of the propagated forces to support mechanical interaction between distant cells. Also, we demonstrate how the dynamic changes in the ECM structure can lead to improve transport of molecules traveling between the cells, facilitating mechano-biochemical interactions. Such long-range force interactions through the ECM can drive large-scale cooperative biological processes, such that occur during wound healing and morphogenesis. Our work can also provide design parameters for biomaterials used in tissue engineering applications.

  • January30

    09:30 AM

    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall

    The Helen and Martin Kimmel Institute for Magnetic Resonance

    New MRI methods to evaluate structure and function of the left atrium

    Prof. Dana C. Peters

    The left atrium is important as the site of many arrhythmias, is essential to the ventricle as a booster pump, and...

    The left atrium is important as the site of many arrhythmias, is essential to the ventricle as a booster pump, and provides an early indicator of for many cardiovascular diseases. We have developed MR imaging methods for measuring remodeling of the left atrium including measurement and quantification of left atrial fibrosis, evaluation of function, volumes, strain, and diastolic indices of elevated filling pressure, which affect the atrium.

  • January30

    09:30 AM

    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall

    The Helen and Martin Kimmel Institute for Magnetic Resonance

    New MRI methods to evaluate structure and function of the left atrium

    Prof. Dana Peters

  • February09

    11:00 AM

    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building

    Room 404

    Soft Matter and Biomaterials

    From contraction waves to rupture resistance – biological tissues as active solids

    Dr. Shahaf Armon

    Following our recent observations of contraction waves in the primitive epithelium of Placozoa, we develop a model of...

    Following our recent observations of contraction waves in the primitive epithelium of Placozoa, we develop a model of tissues as sheets of contractile cells. The simple model assumes only a strain-threshold for contraction, and explains/predicts a variety of unique and surprising phenomena, e.g.: contraction waves in response to external stress, spontaneously-compressed steady-state, emerged limit-cycles, mechanical frustration and active resistance to rupture. In the talk I will present both the experimental observations and the model results. This model of “active cohesion” may be relevant to any epithelial tissue, to manufacturing of synthetic active materials, and to models of evolution of multicellularity.

  • February12

    11:00 AM

    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall

    Exciton and trions in Van der Waals materials and their dynamics under different non-uniform strain configurations

    Dr. Moshe Harats

    Abstract: In recent years, Van der Waals (2D) materials, have attracted increasing attention due to their distinctive...

    Abstract: In recent years, Van der Waals (2D) materials, have attracted increasing attention due to their distinctive physical properties. As layered materials, they have been considered for flexible electronics as they can sustain strain higher than 10% without breaking down, although they are only 1-3 atom thick. Their superior mechanical properties led to a renewed interest in the mechanics of thin membranes linked to condensed matter physics. In this talk we will show how we can apply non-uniform strain to a suspended Van der Waals material (WS2) and alter the dynamics of excitons and trions. Surprisingly, we find that as we increase the non-uniformity of the strain, we are able to convert the excitons into trions with almost 100% efficiency without any electrostatic gating. Our results explain inconsistencies in previous experiments and pave the way towards new types of optoelectronic devices.

Upcoming Events

  • April05

    08:00 AM

    David Lopatie Conference Centre

    Kimmel Auditorium

    A Random Walk in Soft Matter- in honor of Jacob Klein