Lectures and Events - Department of Materials and Interfaces

Upcoming Lectures

  • February19

    11:00 AM

    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building

    Room 404

    Molecule-metal interface - analysis and optimization

    Prof. Piotr Cyganik

    A few nanometer thin interface which is formed between the metal and the organic structure controls bonding strength...

    A few nanometer thin interface which is formed between the metal and the organic structure controls bonding strength, stability and charge transfer between these two quite different types of materials. To understand and optimize formation of that interface at the nanoscale we used Self-Assembled Monolayers (SAMs) which are considered a model system for the analysis of the interaction of organic molecules with the metal substrate. In this presentation we will focus on application of a new experimental approach based on ion beam-induced desorption which we used to address this problem demonstrating for the first time the effect of oscillations in stability of consecutive chemical bonds at the molecule-metal interface. As a next step we will analyze the consequence of this effect for the thermal stability of a model SAM systems and, finally, we will discuss how this effect can contribute to the charge transport at the molecule-metal interface

  • February21

    10:00 AM

    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building

    Room 404

    The Helen and Martin Kimmel Institute for Magnetic Resonance

    NMR Across the Periodic Table: Observing "Invisible" Nuclides in Solid Materials

    Prof. Robert Schurko

    Recent developments in pulse sequences and NMR hardware have opened up many "exotic" nuclides in...

    Recent developments in pulse sequences and NMR hardware have opened up many "exotic" nuclides in the periodic table to experimentation by solid-state NMR. Many of these nuclides are classified as unreceptive, and have been avoided by NMR spectroscopists and chemists in general, due to factors such as low Larmor frequencies, low natural abundances, inconveniently short or long relaxation times, etc. In addition, there are numerous systems in which these nuclides have extremely broad NMR patterns resulting from large anisotropic chemical shielding or quadrupolar interactions. Such nuclei have long been classified as "invisible", since their NMR spectra cannot be observed using standard NMR pulse sequences. In this lecture, I will show that there are several robust strategies one can apply to acquire high quality solid-state NMR spectra of a variety of nuclei, including 10B, 14N, 27Al, 35/37Cl, 47/49Ti, 59Co, 63/65Cu, 69/71Ga, 91Zr, 93Nb, 139La, 195Pt, and 209Bi. Ultra-wideline NMR spectra, when coupled with X-ray crystallography and ab initio methods, provide powerful probes of molecular structure in inorganic, organic and organometallic materials. New advances in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR for the acquisition of ultra-wideline NMR spectra will also be discussed

  • February24

    11:00 AM

    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building

    Room 404

    Soft Matter and Biomaterials

    Network Formation of Oppositely Charged Polyelectrolytes

    Prof. Eyal Zussman

    Mixing semi-dilute solutions of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes generally yields compositions spanning complexes...

    Mixing semi-dilute solutions of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes generally yields compositions spanning complexes (solid) to coacervates (elastic liquid) to dissolved solutions with increasing salt concentration. In this work we show how to form a strong network of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes by using an interplay of hydrogen, hydrophobic, and electrostatic interactions.

  • February24

    14:00 PM

    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building

    Room 404

    An insight into symmetry properties of halide perovskites

    Prof. Jacky Even

    3D halide perovskites have emerged as a new class of semiconductors, but some basic optoelectronic properties of 3D...

    3D halide perovskites have emerged as a new class of semiconductors, but some basic optoelectronic properties of 3D bulk halide perovskites are still shrouded in mystery. The talk will start from a simplified representation of the halide perovskite lattice allowing to progressively account for various advanced topics.

  • February24

    15:00 PM

    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building

    Room 404

    Halide perovskites: A new class of semiconductors with emergent properties

    Prof. Aditya Mohite

    Halide (hybrid) perovskites (HaP) have emerged as a new class of semiconductors that truly encompass all the desired...

    Halide (hybrid) perovskites (HaP) have emerged as a new class of semiconductors that truly encompass all the desired physical properties for building optoelectronic and quantum devices such as large tunable band-gaps, large absorption coefficients, long diffusion lengths, low effective mass, good mobility and long radiative lifetimes. In addition, HaPs are solution processed or low-temperature vapor grown semiconductors and are made from earth abundant materials thus making them technologically relevant in terms of cost/performance. As a result, proof-of-concept high efficiency optoelectronic devices such as photovoltaics and LEDs have been fabricated. In fact, photovoltaic efficiencies have sky rocketed to 23% merely in the past five years and are nearly on-par with mono-crystalline Si based solar cells. Such unprecedented progress has attracted tremendous interest among researchers to investigate the structure-function relationship and understand as to what makes Halide hybrid perovskites special? In my talk, I will attempt to answer some of the key questions and in doing so share the results from our work on HaPs over the past four years in understanding structure induced properties of HaPs. I will also highlight fundamental bottlenecks that exist going forward which present opportunities to create platforms to understand the interplay between light, fields and structure on the properties of perovskite-based materials.

  • February27

    11:00 AM

    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building

    Room 404

    Diamond quantum technologies: magnetic sensing, hyperpolarization and noise spectroscopy

    Prof. Nir Bar-Gill

    Nitrogen Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond have emerged over the past few years as well-controlled quantum systems, with...

    Nitrogen Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond have emerged over the past few years as well-controlled quantum systems, with promising applications ranging from quantum information science to magnetic sensing. In this talk, I will first introduce the NV center system and the experimental methods used for measuring them and controlling their quantum spin dynamics. I will mention the application of magnetic sensing using NVs through the realization of a magnetic microscope [1]. I will then describe our work on nuclear hyperpolarization, potentially relevant for enhanced MRI contrast, and research into open quantum systems and quantum thermodynamics [2]. Finally, I will present related control sequences, which can be used to perform optimized quantum noise spectroscopy, allowing for precise characterization of the environment surrounding a quantum sensor [3]. 1. E. FARCHI ET. AL., SPIN 7, 1740015 (2017). 2. HOVAV, Y., NAYDENOV, B., JELEZKO, F. AND BAR-GILL, N., PHYS. REV. LETT. 120, 6, 060405 (2018) 3. Y. ROMACH ET. AL., PHYS. REV. APPLIED 11, 014064 (2019).

  • February28

    10:00 AM

    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building

    Room 404

    Publishing in Nature Communications

    Dr. Bo Liu

    In this talk, I will introduce the Nature Communications journal, the editorial office in Shanghai, the editorial...

    In this talk, I will introduce the Nature Communications journal, the editorial office in Shanghai, the editorial process and insiders’ view on the Nature Communications. Bo joined Nature Communications in March 2017. Following his undergraduate studies in Zhejiang University, China, he obtained his PhD in Physics at National University of Singapore. He then carried out his postdoctoral research at Graphene Research Center in Singapore and University of Washington. He currently handles manuscripts on solar cells and halide perovskite photophysics. Bo is based in the Shanghai office.

  • April01

    14:00 PM

    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building

    Room 404

    To be announced

    Prof. Beena Kalisky

  • April03

    11:00 AM

    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building

    Room 404

    to be announced

    Prof. Max Shtein

  • April15

    14:00 PM

    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building

    Room 404

    to be announced

    Prof. Diana Golodnitsky

Upcoming Events

  • April05

    08:00 AM

    David Lopatie Conference Centre

    Kimmel Auditorium

    Soft matter (tentative)