Lectures and Events - Department of Materials and Interfaces

Upcoming Lectures

  • June20

    10:00 AM

    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building

    Room 404

    The Helen and Martin Kimmel Institute for Magnetic Resonance

    Single and multi-frequency saturation methods for molecular and microstructural contrast in human MRI”

    Prof. Elena Vinogradov

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provides excellent quality images of soft tissues and is an established modality for...

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provides excellent quality images of soft tissues and is an established modality for diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of various diseases. Majority of MRI scans in clinical practice today report on anatomy, morphology and sometimes physiology. The new area of active studies is aimed at developing MRI contrast methods for the detection of the events at the microstructural and molecular level employing endogenous properties. Here, we will discuss methods that employ single- and multi-frequency saturation to detect events on microstructural and molecular level. First, we will describe principles and translational aspects of Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer1(CEST). CEST employs selective saturation of the exchanging protons and subsequent detection of the water signal decrease to create images that are weighted by the presence of a metabolite or pH2. We will describe aspects of translating CEST to reliable clinical applications and discuss its potential uses in human oncology, specifically breast cancer. Second, we will describe a method called inhomogeneous Magnetization Transfer3 (ihMT), which employs dual-frequency saturation to create contrast originating from the residual dipolar couplings and thus specific to microstructure. We will focus on the application of ihMT to the detection of myelin in brain and spinal cord. Finally, we will discuss a novel exchange-sensitive method based on the balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequence as an alternative way for chemical exchange detection (bSSFPX4). Using an effective field description, similarities between bSSFP and CW application can be explored and utilized for in-vivo MRI contrast. [1] K. Ward, et.al., JMR,143,79-87 (2000). [2] J. Zhou, et.al., Nature Medicine, 9,1085-1090 (2003). [3] G. Varma, et.al., MRM, 73, 614-622 (2015). [4] S. Zhang, et.al., JMR, 275, 55-67 (2017).

  • June23

    11:00 AM

    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building

    Room 404

    Soft Matter and Biomaterials

    TBA

    Prof. Pavel Jungwirth

  • June23

    14:00 PM

    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building

    Room 404

    Strongly interacting phonons at finite temperature

    Dr. Olle Hellman

    Thermal motions of atoms is an ever-present phenomenon in all of solid state physics. Phonons, quanta of heat, is the...

    Thermal motions of atoms is an ever-present phenomenon in all of solid state physics. Phonons, quanta of heat, is the quasiparticule used to describe thermal motion in solids. Under normal conditions phonons are the dominant mechanism that govern transport and the largest contribution to entropy. I want to understand how phonons evolve in time, temperature, and how they behave when they interact strongly with each other or other quasiparticles. The inherent disorder in thermal motions makes theoretical predictions challenging. I will present methodological developments in finite temperature first principles simulations, specifically targeting strongly anharmonic systems. The method employs model Hamiltonians that explicitly depend on temperature. I will present applications pertaining to thermal conductivity, inelastic neutron spectra and phase stabilities, reproducing non-trivial temperature dependencies.

  • June27

    10:00 AM

    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building

    Room 404

    The Helen and Martin Kimmel Institute for Magnetic Resonance

    Measuring nanometre distances in biomolecules using EPR Spectroscopy

    Dr. Janet Lovett

    EPR spectroscopy can be used to measure nanometre-scale distances within biomolecules and other soft matter, through...

    EPR spectroscopy can be used to measure nanometre-scale distances within biomolecules and other soft matter, through determining the dipolar coupling between paramagnetic centres. These can be placed site-specifically within the molecules-of-interest as spin labels. Some experiments that measure the dipolar coupling will be introduced, and results including new spin labels and applications of the methodology will be discussed.

  • July14

    11:00 AM

    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building

    Room 404

    Soft Matter and Biomaterials

    Trio correlation between cell mechanics, phagocytic capacity, and cancer aggressiveness

    Prof. Ofra Benny

    A comprehensive study showing a trio correlation between cell mechanics, phagocytic capacity, and cancer aggressiveness...

    A comprehensive study showing a trio correlation between cell mechanics, phagocytic capacity, and cancer aggressiveness is presented. Mechanical properties of particles are shown to have a critical effect on the interactions with malignant cancer cells. Our findings offers new directions for mechanical based specificity in cancer treatment, and could lead to uptake measurement as a diagnostic tools for precision medicine.

Upcoming Events

  • April05

    08:00 AM

    David Lopatie Conference Centre

    Kimmel Auditorium

    Soft matter (tentative)