You are here

Foundations of Computer Science Seminar

MondayApr 23, 201814:30
Foundations of Computer Science SeminarRoom 155
Speaker:Lior Gishboliner Title:A Generalized Turan Problem and Its ApplicationsAbstract:opens in new windowin html    pdfopens in new window

Our first theorem is a hierarchy theorem for the query complexity of testing graph properties with one-sided error; more precisely, we show that for every sufficiently fast-growing function f from (0,1) to the natural numbers, there is a graph property whose one-sided-error query complexity is precisely f(\Theta(\epsilon)). No result of this type was previously known for any f which is super-polynomial. Goldreich [ECCC 2005] asked to exhibit a graph property whose query complexity is exponential in 1/\epsilon. Our hierarchy theorem partially resolves this problem by exhibiting a property whose one-sided-error query complexity is exponential in 1/\epsilon. We also use our hierarchy theorem in order to resolve a problem raised by Alon and Shapira [STOC 2005] regarding testing relaxed versions of bipartiteness.

Our second theorem states that for any function f there is a graph property whose one-sided-error query complexity is at least f(\epsilon) while its two-sided-error query complexity is only polynomial in 1/\epsilon. This is the first indication of the surprising power that two-sided-error testing algorithms have over one-sided-error ones, even when restricted to properties that are testable with one-sided error. Again, no result of this type was previously known for any f that is super-polynomial.

The above theorems are derived from a graph theoretic result which we think is of independent interest, and might have further applications. Alon and Shikhelman [JCTB 2016] introduced the following generalized Turan problem: for fixed graphs H and T, and an integer n, what is the maximum number of copies of T, denoted by ex(n,T,H), that can appear in an n-vertex H-free graph? This problem received a lot of attention recently, with an emphasis on T = C_3, H=C_{2m+1}. Our third theorem gives tight bounds for ex(n,C_k,C_m) for all the remaining values of k and m.
Joint work with Asaf Shapira.

MondayMay 07, 201814:30
Foundations of Computer Science SeminarRoom 155
Speaker:Yuval Dagan Title:Detecting Correlations with Little Memory and CommunicationAbstract:opens in new windowin html    pdfopens in new window

We study the problem of identifying correlations in multivariate data, under information constraints:
Either on the amount of memory that can be used by the algorithm, or the amount of communi- cation when the data is distributed across several machines. We prove a tight trade-off between the memory/communication complexity and the sample complexity, implying (for example) that to detect pairwise correlations with optimal sample complexity, the number of required mem-ory/communication bits is at least quadratic in the dimension. Our results substantially improve those of Shamir (2014), which studied a similar question in a much more restricted setting. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first provable sample/memory/communication trade-offs for a practical estimation problem, using standard distributions, and in the natural regime where the memory/communication budget is larger than the size of a single data point. To derive our theorems, we prove a new information-theoretic result, which may be relevant for studying other information-constrained learning problems.
Joint work with Ohad Shamir

MondayMay 28, 201814:30
Foundations of Computer Science SeminarRoom 155
Speaker:Kevin Leyton-Brown Title:Learning as a Tool for Algorithm Design and Beyond-Worst-Case AnalysisAbstract:opens in new windowin html    pdfopens in new window

All known algorithms for solving NP-complete prob­lems require exponential time in the worst case; however, these algorithms nevertheless solve many problems of practical importance astoundingly quickly, and are hence relied upon in a broad range of applications. This talk is built around the observation that "Empirical Hardness Models" - statistical models that predict algorithm runtime on novel instances from a given distribution - work surprisingly well. These models can serve as powerful tools for algorithm design, specifically by facilitating automated methods for algorithm design and for constructing algorithm portfolios. They also offer a statistical alternative to beyond-worst-case analysis and a starting point for theoretical investigations.

bio at http://www.cs.ubc.ca/~kevinlb/bio.html