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2020

Developmental Club Series 2019-20-cancelled

Type: Lecture
Date: Jun 24, 2020

Developmental Club Series 2019-20 - cancelled

Type: Lecture
Date: Jun 10, 2020

Developmental Club Series 2019-20

Type: Lecture
Date: May 27, 2020

Developmental Club Series 2019-20

Type: Lecture
Date: May 20, 2020

Developmental Club Series 2019-20

Type: Lecture
Date: May 13, 2020

Developmental Club Series

Type: Lecture
Date: May 06, 2020

Braginsky Center for the Interface between the Sciences and the Humanities

Type: Lecture
Date: Apr 27, 2020

Time13:00 - 14:00

Websitehttps://weizmann.zoom.us/j/99252264007

LecturerProf. Avshalom C. Elitzur

Contactsandra.britton@weizmann.ac.il

Abstract Ever since quantum mechanics has emerged, the phenomena it has revealed turned out to be more and more alien to classical scientific reasoning, undermining basic notions like determinism and cause-and-effect relations. A novel method developed by Aharonov et al. computes the quantum process twice, once from past to future and then vice versa, backwards in time. The combined result gives a much more lucid explanation to all quantum oddities. Moreover it yields some surprising predictions, recently verified by experiments. This is an introduction to these advances and some of their bearings on other sciences

Developmental Club Series 2019-20

Type: Lecture
Date: Apr 22, 2020

Decoding transcriptional regulation in Drosophila

Type: Lecture
Date: Apr 07, 2020

TBA - cancelled

Type: Lecture
Date: Apr 01, 2020

POSTPONED: Developmental Club Series with Elazar Zelzer

Type: Lecture
Date: Mar 25, 2020

Seminar for Thesis Defense- Roni Winkler

Type: Lecture
Date: Mar 19, 2020

Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology

Type: Lecture
Date: Mar 04, 2020

Molecular Genetics special guest seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: Feb 27, 2020

Time11:00 - 12:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerProf. Gilad Barnea

OrganizerSeminar

Contactsandra.britton@weizmann.ac.il

AbstractI will present trans-Tango, a new technique for anterograde transsynaptic circuit tracing and manipulation that we have established in fruit flies. At the core of trans-Tango is a synthetic signaling pathway that is introduced into all neurons in the animal. This pathway converts receptor activation at the cell-surface into reporter expression through site-specific proteolysis. Specific labeling is achieved by presenting a tethered ligand at the synapses of genetically defined neurons, thereby activating the pathway in their postsynaptic partners. Activation of the pathway culminates in expression of a reporter that can be visualized. Because our system is modular, it can be easily adapted to experiments in which the properties of specific circuits are modified and the functional consequences are analyzed. We first validated trans-Tango in the Drosophila olfactory system and then implemented it in the gustatory system, where projections beyond the firstorder receptor neurons are not well characterized. We identified second-order neurons within the sweet and bitter circuits and revealed that they target brain areas involved in neuromodulation with similar but distinct projection patterns. I will also present experiments in which we use trans-Tango in functional analysis of the gustatory circuits. Using our studies in flies as proof of concept, we are currently establishing an equivalent technique for labeling circuits in vertebrate models, such as mice and zebrafish. These experiments establish trans-Tango as a flexible platform for comprehensive transsynaptic analysis of neural circuits.

Developmental Club Series 2019-20

Type: Lecture
Date: Feb 26, 2020

Seminar for thesis defense - Karen Fridman Talmon

Type: Lecture
Date: Feb 13, 2020

Special Guest Seminar with Prof. Detlef Wiegel

Type: Lecture
Date: Feb 12, 2020

Developmental Club Series 2019-20

Type: Lecture
Date: Feb 12, 2020

Special Guest Seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: Feb 05, 2020

Developmental Club Series 2019-20

Type: Lecture
Date: Feb 05, 2020

Developmental Club Series 2019-20

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 29, 2020

Department of Molecular Genetics Special guest seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 28, 2020

Special Guest Seminar with Dr, Michael E. Ward

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 16, 2020

Developmental Club Series 2019-20

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 15, 2020

Special Guest Seminar with Dr. Arbel Harpak

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 02, 2020

Developmental Club Series 2019-20

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 01, 2020

2019

Special Guest Seminar with Dr. Onn Brandman

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 30, 2019

Seminar for thesis defense, Nofar Mor

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 29, 2019

Special guest seminar with Moran Dvela-Levitt

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 22, 2019

Time12:00 - 13:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerMoran Dvela-Levitt

Contactsandra.britton@weizmann.ac.il

AbstractProtein homeostasis is critical for cellular function and survival. Dysregulation of the cellular protein homeostasis can lead to a build-up of misfolded proteins and facilitate the manifestation of a variety of pathological disorders including neurodegeneration, cancer and inflammation. Where and how the misfolded proteins accumulate, however, has remained a mystery. In studying MUC1 kidney disease (a rare kidney disorder), we have found that some of these pathologies may share a single, previously unrecognized cellular mechanism: a jam at a specific step in the secretory pathway involving a cargo receptor called TMED9. A small molecule called BRD4780 can break the jam and restore cells to normal function, providing a promising potential for therapeutic developments.

Seminar for thesis defense, Maya Voichek

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 19, 2019

Special Guest Seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 18, 2019

Developmental Club Series 2019-20

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 18, 2019

Developmental Club Series 2019-20

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 11, 2019

Seminar for thesis Defense - Zohar Erez

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 08, 2019

Special Guest Seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 02, 2019

Seminar for thesis defense Naama Dekel

Type: Lecture
Date: Oct 30, 2019

Special Guest Seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: Oct 27, 2019

Special Guest Seminar with Anat Zimmer

Type: Lecture
Date: Oct 03, 2019

Time14:00 - 15:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerAnat Zimmer

OrganizerThe Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology

Contactsandra.britton@weizmann.ac.il

AbstractIt is a challenge to answer questions like: why some people develop a disease, react to a specific treatment and/or develop severe side-effects while others don’t. In order to explain these occurrences, one has to take a holistic approach and study the body physiology from a systems level perspective. Longitudinal multi-omics measurements together with genetics, on a large population, can serve such a purpose and help in predicting, reasoning, and preventing diseases. In partnership with Arivale Inc., we have developed infrastructure to collect longitudinal Personalized Dense Dynamic Data clouds (PD3 clouds) on thousands of individuals, which include genetics and longitudinal measurements of clinical labs, microbiome, metabolome, proteome, and self-reported data. The value of these extremely high-dimensional data clouds is clear; however, it also comprises a challenge in data analysis and interpretation. One way to reduce data dimensionality is called Pareto Task Inference (PARTI, Hart et al. 2015). We used this method to analyze the clinical labs and found that the data falls on a significant tetrahedron. The 4 vertices are archetypes that specialize in a certain task. Using all other datatypes, we identified enriched traits next to every archetype and revealed the underline tradeoffs that shape the data. This distinctive analysis uncovers unexpected relationships between datasets such as metabolomics, proteomics and clinical labs, and helps in interconnecting the different datatypes to characterize different states of human health.

Special Guest Seminar with Dr. Johnathan Cooper-Knock

Type: Lecture
Date: Sep 05, 2019

Special Guest Seminar with Ophir Shalem

Type: Lecture
Date: Aug 22, 2019

Developmental Club Series 2018-2019

Type: Lecture
Date: Jul 31, 2019

Special Guest Seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: Jul 21, 2019

Shoulder Injury Seminar Department of Molecular Genetics

Type: Lecture
Date: Jul 18, 2019

Special Guest Seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: Jul 16, 2019

Developmental Club Series 2018-2019

Type: Lecture
Date: Jul 03, 2019

Departmental Seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: Jun 30, 2019

Developmental Club Series 2018-2019

Type: Lecture
Date: Jun 26, 2019

Developmental Club

Type: Lecture
Date: Jun 19, 2019

Departmental Seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: Jun 16, 2019

Developmental Club Series 2018-2019

Type: Lecture
Date: Jun 12, 2019

Developmental Club Series 2018-2019

Type: Lecture
Date: Jun 12, 2019

Departmental Seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: Jun 02, 2019

Developmental Club

Type: Lecture
Date: May 29, 2019

Time10:00 - 11:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerProf. Shalev Itzkovitz

Contactevi.ben-ami@weizmann.ac.il

Departmental Seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: May 26, 2019

Departmental Seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: May 19, 2019

Departmental Seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: May 12, 2019

Time13:00 - 14:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerHagai Marmor

OrganizerDDP Seminar

Contactevi@weizmann.ac.il

Developmental Club Series 2018-2019

Type: Lecture
Date: May 07, 2019

Seminar for thesis defense

Type: Lecture
Date: May 05, 2019

Developmental Club Series 2018-2019

Type: Lecture
Date: May 01, 2019

Departmental Seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: Apr 28, 2019

Time13:00 - 14:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerInes Castro

OrganizerDDP Seminar

Contactsandra.britton@weizmann.ac.il

Developmental Club Series 2018-2019

Type: Lecture
Date: Apr 17, 2019

Special Guest Seminar with Dr. Markus Mund

Type: Lecture
Date: Apr 16, 2019

Special Guest Seminar with prof. Johannes Herrmann

Type: Lecture
Date: Apr 11, 2019

Special guest seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: Apr 04, 2019

Developmental Club Series 2018-2019

Type: Lecture
Date: Apr 03, 2019

Developmental Club Series 2018-2019

Type: Lecture
Date: Mar 20, 2019

Developmental Club Series 2018-2019

Type: Lecture
Date: Mar 20, 2019

Department of Molecular Genetics seminar for thesis defense

Type: Lecture
Date: Mar 19, 2019

Developmental Club Series 2018-2019

Type: Lecture
Date: Mar 13, 2019

Developmental Club Series 2018-2019

Type: Lecture
Date: Mar 06, 2019

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2018-2019

Type: Lecture
Date: Feb 24, 2019

Seminar for thesis defense

Type: Lecture
Date: Feb 20, 2019

Developmental Club Series 2018-2019

Type: Lecture
Date: Feb 06, 2019

"Mechanisms of asymmetric cell division"

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 28, 2019

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2018-2019

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 27, 2019

Special Guest Seminar with Prof. Meytal Landau

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 22, 2019

Special Guest Seminar with Dan Bracha

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 17, 2019

Special Guest Seminar with Ariel Schwartz

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 17, 2019

Time10:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerDr. Ariel Schwartz

OrganizerGuest Lecture

Contactsandra.britton@weizmann.ac.il

AbstractComputational assignment of function to proteins with no known homologs is still an unsolved problem. We have created a novel, function-based approach to protein annotation and discovery called D-SPACE (Deep Semantic Protein Annotation Classification and Exploration), comprised of a multi-task, multi-label deep neural network trained on over 70 million proteins. Distinct from homology and motif-based methods, D-SPACE encodes proteins in high-dimensional representations (embeddings), allowing the accurate assignment of over 180,000 labels for 13 distinct tasks. The embedding representation enables fast searches for functionally related proteins, including homologs undetectable by traditional approaches. D-SPACE annotates all 109 million proteins in UniProt in under 35 hours on a single computer and searches the entirety of these in seconds. D-SPACE further quantifies the relative functional effect of mutations, facilitating rapid in-silico mutagenesis for protein engineering applications. D-SPACE incorporates protein annotation, search, and other exploratory efforts into a single cohesive model. We have recently extended this work from protein to DNA, enabling assignment of function to whole genomes and metagenomic contigs in seconds. Conserved genomic motifs as well as the functional impact of mutations in coding as well as non-coding genomic regions can be predicted directly from raw DNA sequence without the use of traditional comparative genomics approaches for motif detection, such as multiple sequence alignments, PSSMs, and profile HMMs.

Special Guest Seminar with Dr. Shai Carmi

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 16, 2019

Time11:30

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerDr. Shai Carmi

Contactilona.kalderon@weizmann.ac.il

AbstractIn this talk, I will review recent work by myself and others on Jewish population and medical genetics, focusing on Ashkenazi Jews (AJ). I will describe the mixture events of AJ in Europe, the founder event they have experienced in the late Middle Ages, and their connections to ancient populations of the Levant. I will then describe large-scale genomic databases that we have recently generated for AJ, and the opportunities they open in medical genetics given the unique AJ demographic history. I will describe a few medical genetics projects including carrier screening, genome-wide association studies of microbiome composition and other traits, and preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2018-2019

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 13, 2019

Developmental Club Series 2018-2019

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 09, 2019

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2018-2019

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 06, 2019

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2018-2019

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 06, 2019

Smaller is better

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 03, 2019

2018

Developmental Club Series 2018-19

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 26, 2018

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2018-2019

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 16, 2018

Joint mini-symposium

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 13, 2018

Developmental Club Series 2018-19

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 12, 2018

Developmental Club Series 2018-2019, special guest seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 05, 2018

Time10:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerProf. Naihe Jing

OrganizerDevelopmental Club

Contactsandra.britton@weizmann.ac.il

AbstractDuring postimplantation development of the mouse embryo, descendants of the inner cell mass cells in the early epiblast transit from the naïve pluripotent state to the primed pluripotent state. Concurrent with the transition of the pluripotency states is the specification of cell lineages and formation of germ layers in the embryos that serves as the blueprint for embryogenesis. Fate mapping and lineage analysis studies have revealed that cells in different regions of the germ layers acquire location-specific cell fates during gastrulation. The regionalization of cell fates heralding the formation of the basic body plan is conserved in vertebrate embryos at a common phylotypic stage of development. Knowledge of the molecular regulation that underpins the lineage specification and tissue patterning is instrumental for understanding embryonic programming and stem cell-based translational study. However, a genome-wide molecular annotation of lineage segregation and tissue architecture of post-implantation embryo has yet to be undertaken. Here, we reported a spatially resolved transcriptome of cell populations at defined positions in the germ layers over the period of pre- to late gastrulation development. This spatio-temporal transcriptome provides high resolution digitized in situ gene expression profiles and defines the molecular attribute of the genealogy of lineages and continuum of pluripotency states in time and space. The transcriptome further identifies the networks of molecular determinants that drive lineage specification and tissue patterning in the early postimplantation mouse embryo.

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2018-2019

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 02, 2018

Developmental Club Series 2018-2019

Type: Lecture
Date: Nov 28, 2018

Nuclear Genome Nanostructure Imaging at Single Molecule Resolution

Type: Lecture
Date: Nov 20, 2018

Time10:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerProf. Christoph Cremer

OrganizerDevelopmental Club

ContactIngrid.lehrer@weizmann.ac.il

AbstractSuper-resolution fluorescence microscopy allows quantitative studies of nuclear genome organization on the nanoscale1. Here we report on results obtained by single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM). SMLM has made possible to explore chromatin nanostructure down to the imaging of single histones, of short oligosequences, or single DNA sites; presently, an intranuclear optical resolution down to the 5 nm range has been achieved. Applying a novel SMLM technique (fBALM)2, the DNA distribution across entire nuclei at nanoscale resolution was quantitatively determined, localizing in individual nuclear optical sections up to ~4 million individual DNA bound single fluorophore molecule positions, corresponding to about one position per nucleosome. Intensity profile analyses of the intranuclear DNA distributions indicated sharp transitions between high-density domains and low-density compartments, with differences up to almost two orders of magnitude; compacted regions had a minimum diameter down to ca. 50 nm diameter. In contrast to these results, conventional resolution imaging of the same nuclear sites indicated only small differences in the compaction of different regions, combined with very smooth density transitions. Taken together, the quantitative compaction estimates support models of a nuclear organization based on highly compartmentalized chromatin nanostructures3.

Special Guest Seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: Nov 19, 2018

Time10:00

LocationNella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences

LecturerDr. Nadav Sharon

OrganizerSpecial Guest Seminar

Contactsandra.britton@weizmann.ac.il

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2018-2019

Type: Lecture
Date: Nov 18, 2018

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2018-2019

Type: Lecture
Date: Nov 18, 2018

Special Guest Seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: Nov 08, 2018

Time10:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerProf. Eugene Rosenberg

OrganizerSpecial Guest Seminar

Contactsandra.britton@weizmann.ac.il

Developmental Club Series 2018-2019

Type: Lecture
Date: Oct 31, 2018

Seminar for thesis defense

Type: Lecture
Date: Oct 11, 2018

Developmental Club Series 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Jul 18, 2018

Department of Molecular Genetics seminar for thesis defense

Type: Lecture
Date: Jul 04, 2018

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Jul 01, 2018

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Jun 24, 2018

Special Guest Seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: Jun 20, 2018

Time14:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerNava Segev

OrganizerSpecial Guest Seminar

Contactsandra.britton@weizmann.ac.il

Developmental Club Series 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Jun 20, 2018

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Jun 17, 2018

Developmental Club Series 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Jun 06, 2018

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Jun 03, 2018

Building the pathway for motion vision

Type: Lecture
Date: May 27, 2018

Developmental Club Series 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: May 23, 2018

Developmental Club Series 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: May 16, 2018

Accelerating bio discovery with machine learning

Type: Lecture
Date: May 15, 2018

Time14:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerPhilip Nelson

OrganizerThe Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology

ContactIngrid.lehrer@weizmann.ac.il

AbstractGoogle Accelerated Sciences is a translational research team that brings Google's technological expertise to the scientific community. Recent advances in machine learning have delivered incredible results in consumer applications (e.g. photo recognition, language translation), and is now beginning to play an important role in life sciences. Taking examples from active collaborations in the biochemical, biological, and biomedical fields, I will focus on how our team transforms science problems into data problems and applies Google's scaled computation, data-driven engineering, and machine learning to accelerate discovery.

Leica Biosystems

Type: Lecture
Date: May 15, 2018

Time10:00 - 11:30

LocationRaoul and Graziella de Picciotto Building for Scientific and Technical Support

LecturerDr. Dorothee Lasrich

Contactsandra.britton@weizmann.ac.il

Cyagen technologies

Type: Lecture
Date: May 14, 2018

Time14:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerDr. Matthew Wheeler

OrganizerThe Arthur & Rochelle Belfer Institute of Mathematics and Computer Science

Contactsandra.britton@weizmann.ac.il

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: May 13, 2018

Developmental Club Series 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: May 09, 2018

Time10:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerDr. James Sharpe

OrganizerDevelopmental Club

Contactsandra.britton@weizmann.ac.il

AbstractThe vertebrate limb bud is a classical model system for developmental biology – with the advantage of having been studied for many decades. Despite this, and despite its relatively simple shape, a consensus model of its physical morphogenesis has not been reached. I will introduce our own hypothesis on limb bud morphogenesis – convergent-extension coupled with tissue growth – and contrast it to previous ideas. I will introduce a 3D dynamical model which captures this hypothesis (a Cellular Potts Model) and also discuss our ongoing improvements to these simulations.

Atlases of structure-function relationships in small motifs: the limits of modularity

Type: Lecture
Date: May 08, 2018

Time14:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerDr. James Sharpe

OrganizerSystem Biology

ContactIngrid.lehrer@weizmann.ac.il

AbstractAbstract: I will discuss our work on visualizing “topology atlases” which act as a map of possible circuit designs for small 3-node regulatory motifs. These can help in understanding the relationship between a circuit's structure and its function, but how is this relationship affected if the circuit must perform multiple distinct functions within the same organism? In particular, to what extent do multi‐functional circuits contain modules which reflect the different functions? We computationally surveyed a range of bi‐functional circuits which show no simple structural modularity: They can switch between two qualitatively distinct functions, while both functions depend on all genes of the circuit. Our analysis revealed two distinct classes: hybrid circuits which overlay two simpler mono‐functional sub‐circuits within their circuitry, and emergent circuits, which do not. In this second class, the bi‐functionality emerges from more complex designs which are not fully decomposable into distinct modules and are consequently less intuitive to predict or understand. These non‐intuitive emergent circuits are just as robust as their hybrid counterparts, and we therefore suggest that the common bias toward studying modular systems may hinder our understanding of real biological circuits. Relevant papers: 1. A spectrum of modularity in multi-functional gene circuits. Jiménez A, Cotterell J, Munteanu A, Sharpe J. (2017) Mol Syst Biol 13(4):925. doi: 10.15252/msb.20167347 http://msb.embopress.org/content/13/4/925 2. An atlas of gene regulatory networks reveals multiple three-gene mechanisms for interpreting morphogen gradients. Cotterell J, Sharpe J. (2010) Mol Syst Biol 6:425. doi: 10.1038/msb.2010.74 http://msb.embopress.org/content/6/1/425 Bio: James Sharpe was originally captivated by computer programming, but upon learning about the digital nature of the genetic code, chose to study Biology for his undergraduate degree at Oxford University (1988-1991). He then did his PhD on the genetic control of embryo development at NIMR, London (1992-1997) and in parallel started writing computer simulations of multicellular development. During his post-doc in Edinburgh, he began modelling the dynamics of limb development, and also invented a new optical imaging technology called Optical Projection Tomography (OPT), which is dedicated to imaging specimens too large for microscopy - tissues and organs. In 2006 he moved to Barcelona, becoming a senior group leader at the Centre for Genomic Regulation, and focusing on a systems biology approach to modelling limb development – combining experimentation with computer modelling. In this way the group demonstrated that the signalling proteins which pattern the fingers during embryogenesis, act as a Turing reaction-diffusion system. In 2011 he became the coordinator of the Systems Biology Program, and in 2017 was recruited to EMBL as Head of the new Barcelona outstation on Tissue Biology and Disease Modelling.

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: Apr 29, 2018

Developmental Club Series 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Apr 25, 2018

Developmental Club Series 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Apr 25, 2018

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Apr 22, 2018

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Apr 15, 2018

Special Guest Seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: Apr 11, 2018

Time11:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerAvi Ashkenazi, PhD

OrganizerSpecial Guest Seminar

Contactsandra.britton@weizmann.ac.il

AbstractPrecise protein folding by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) supports homeostasis, while cumulative protein misfolding causes ER stress and promotes disease. The kinases PERK and IRE1 help orchestrate the unfolded protein response (UPR) to alleviate ER stress; however, if stress persists, the UPR activates apoptosis to eliminate the damaged cell. We have previously shown that PERK drives cell death via transcriptional up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic death receptor DR5; we further showed that IRE1—which harbors both kinase and RNase modules—blocks apoptosis through regulated IRE1-dependent mRNA decay (RIDD) of DR5 (Lu et al, Science 2014). Recently, we turned to investigate the paradoxical observation that under irresolvable ER stress PERK activity persists, while IRE1 function attenuates. We discovered that PERK governs the attenuation of IRE1, through a phosphatase called RNA polymerase II-associated protein 2 (RPAP2). RPAP2 reverses IRE1 phosphorylation, inhibiting IRE1 RNase activation. This disrupts IRE1-dependent generation of the cytoprotective transcription factor XBP1s and dampens ER-associated degradation of misfolded proteins. Furthermore, it inhibits RIDD, thereby licensing DR5-mediated caspase activation and apoptotic cell death. Thus, under excessive ER stress, PERK attenuates IRE1 via RPAP2 to abort failed adaptation and trigger an apoptotic cell fate.

Special Guest Seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: Apr 11, 2018

Time11:00 - 12:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerDr. Avi Ashkenazi

OrganizerSpecial Guest Seminar

Contactsandra.britton@weizmann.ac.il

AbstractPrecise protein folding by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) supports homeostasis, while cumulative protein misfolding causes ER stress and promotes disease. The kinases PERK and IRE1 help orchestrate the unfolded protein response (UPR) to alleviate ER stress; however, if stress persists, the UPR activates apoptosis to eliminate the damaged cell. We have previously shown that PERK drives cell death via transcriptional up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic death receptor DR5; we further showed that IRE1—which harbors both kinase and RNase modules—blocks apoptosis through regulated IRE1-dependent mRNA decay (RIDD) of DR5 (Lu et al, Science 2014). Recently, we turned to investigate the paradoxical observation that under irresolvable ER stress PERK activity persists, while IRE1 function attenuates. We discovered that PERK governs the attenuation of IRE1, through a phosphatase called RNA polymerase II-associated protein 2 (RPAP2). RPAP2 reverses IRE1 phosphorylation, inhibiting IRE1 RNase activation. This disrupts IRE1-dependent generation of the cytoprotective transcription factor XBP1s and dampens ER-associated degradation of misfolded proteins. Furthermore, it inhibits RIDD, thereby licensing DR5-mediated caspase activation and apoptotic cell death. Thus, under excessive ER stress, PERK attenuates IRE1 via RPAP2 to abort failed adaptation and trigger an apoptotic cell fate.

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Apr 08, 2018

Barcoding evolution

Type: Lecture
Date: Mar 27, 2018

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Mar 25, 2018

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Mar 11, 2018

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Mar 11, 2018

Developmental Club Series 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Mar 07, 2018

Developmental Club Series 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Mar 07, 2018

Predator-prey interactions of nematophagous fungi and C. elegans

Type: Lecture
Date: Mar 01, 2018

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Feb 25, 2018

Developmental Club Series 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Feb 07, 2018

Noncoding RNA in Health and Disease

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 30, 2018

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 28, 2018

Developmental Club Series 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 24, 2018

Functions and regulation of 3D genome organisation in development and disease

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 23, 2018

Time10:00 - 11:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerProf. Francois Spitz

OrganizerSystem Biology

Contactingrid.lehrer@weizmann.ac.il

AbstractThe complex hierarchy of three-dimensional patterns that characterize the 3D folding of mammalian chromosomes appears as an important element in controlling gene expression. At the megabase scale, chromosomes are partitioned into domains that define two main compartments, corresponding to transcriptionally active and inactive regions, respectively. Each compartment domain is itself composed of distinct domains characterized by increased self-interactions called topological domains (TADs). Recent high-resolution Hi-C approaches revealed a finer-scale organisation of the genome in smaller “contact domains”, often associated with loops linking specific points. At these different scales, the spatial organisation of the genome shows tight correlation with its chromatin structure and its transcriptional activity. However, while steady progress is being made in describing the 3D folding of the genome at increased resolution, the mechanisms that determine this folding, its dynamic properties and the functional implications of these emerging features are still poorly understood. We use advanced genome tagging and engineering strategies, as well as targeted inactivation of factors involved in chromosomal folding to unravel the elements and mechanisms that drive the folding of large loci in specific yet dynamic conformations and their influence on gene expression. Our recent results show that the complex patterns of vertebrate HiC maps result from the superimposition of two distinct mechanisms: 1) a cohesin-independent mechanism which brings together regions of similar chromatin states 2) a cohesin-dependent folding that associate different small compartments into TADs. Within TADS, we show as well that enhancers are not acting in a homogeneous manner, but that their influence is distributed in complex patterns, partially guided by the underlying structure. I will discuss the different implications of these findings for our views of genome organisation.

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 21, 2018

Frontiers in Systems Biology: Prof. Anshule Kundaje

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 16, 2018

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 14, 2018

Molecular Genetics Special Guest Seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 10, 2018

Developmental Club Series 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 10, 2018

Perception and computation in cellular signaling pathways

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 09, 2018

Single cell analysis of rare events in cancer

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 09, 2018

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 07, 2018

2017

Special Guest Seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 28, 2017

Time12:00 - 13:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerRavit Boger, MD

OrganizerGuest Lecture

Contactsandra.britton@weizmann.ac.il

Developmental Club Series 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 27, 2017

Departmental Seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 24, 2017

Time13:00 - 14:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

Lecturer Gal Nuta

OrganizerStudent and Post-Doc Seminar

Contactsandra.britton@weizmann.ac.il

Developmental Club Series 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 20, 2017

Frontiers in Systems Biology

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 19, 2017

Time10:00 - 11:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerProf. Mihaela Zavolan

OrganizerSystem Biology

Contactsandra.britton@weizmann.ac.il

AbstractIn yeast, the knock out of individual ribosomal protein (RP) genes leads to a wide range of life span phenotypes, some mutants having significantly increased, other significantly decreased life span. In this talk I would like to present our efforts in characterizing the regulation of mRNA translation in relation to cellular states, from yeast to man. I will describe our work on inferring determinants of protein synthesis rates in yeast, where we found that the Gcn4 transcription factor, which is induced in many conditions that enhance yeast lifespan (RP gene knockout, calorie restriction, mTOR inhibition) not only activates transcription of amino acid biosynthesis genes, but also represses protein biosynthesis. How much variation in RP expression is expected in human tissues has been largely unknown, but RP gene mutations have been described in association with hematological disorders. Through a comprehensive analysis of human RP mRNAs expression pattern across 28 tissues, over 300 primary cells and 16 tumor types, we identified many RPs which exhibit tissue-specific expression. In the hematopoietic system, a small number of RP genes, possible regulated by transcription factors with tissue-specific expression, unequivocally discriminate cells of distinct lineages and developmental stages. Different cancer types also show dysregulated expression of individual RPs, some RPs having a relative increase and other decrease in expression. Finally, I will discuss our efforts in mapping sites of snoRNA-guided RNA modifications.

(Re)Constructing the Vertebrate Neural Tube

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 07, 2017

Developmental Club Series 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 06, 2017

Frontiers in Systems Biology: Prof. Jörg Vogel

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 05, 2017

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 03, 2017

Population as Distributed Memory System

Type: Lecture
Date: Nov 29, 2017

Time11:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerDr. Ehud Lamm

ContactIngrid.lehrer@weizmann.ac.il

AbstractWe show how the distribution of skills or phenotypes in a population acts as collective memory or "distributed information store" serving individual so that individuals with varying innate abilities are able to attain the mature fully skilled phenotype. We show how information moves "in" and "out" of genomes, relative to this memory system, elucidating how evolution determines where best to store information. This question applies to understanding diverse biological systems in which individuals acquire capacities from the population, including immunity, the microbiome, and social learning. Using Agent Based Modeling we investigate how properties of the population and social aspects of the acquisition process affect the behavior of the system. We show that the genetic properties of the population react predictably to changes in population properties that affect selection pressures, without any group level selective processes. Specifically, parameter changes that make acquisition slower lead to skills becoming increasingly innate while changes in parameters that improve the results of acquisition (e.g., making acquisition reliant on abundant left-over tools) lead to an increased reliance on acquisition, all while the average phenotype remains constant. The dynamics we study contribute to understanding how individuals can evolve to become more or less reliant on social learning and cultural information, how this depends on population properties (e.g., group size), and how this manifests demographically. The more information stored externally, the stronger the selection pressure on traits that support acquisition. Finally, we contrast our model and the Baldwin Effect and relate out results to the study of the evolution of human social learning.

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Nov 26, 2017

Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Nov 19, 2017

Developmental Club Series 2017-2018

Type: Lecture
Date: Nov 08, 2017

You say tomato, I say potato. Evolution of the genetic code in yeasts

Type: Lecture
Date: Nov 07, 2017

Specificity and evolution of bacterial signaling proteins

Type: Lecture
Date: Oct 31, 2017

Time10:00 - 11:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerProf. Michael Laub

OrganizerSystem Biology

Contactingrid.lehrer@weizmann.ac.il

AbstractProtein-protein interactions are critical to the operation and functions of all cells. The specificity of these interactions is often dictated at the level of molecular recognition, meaning proteins have an intrinsic ability to discriminate cognate from non-cognate partners. Understanding precisely how this discrimination is accomplished remains a major problem, particularly for paralogous protein families in which the individual members share high sequence and structural similarity. Our work tackles this problem primarily in the context of two-component signal transduction systems, the predominant form of signaling in bacteria, and more recently with toxin-antitoxin systems, also found throughout the bacterial kingdom. I will describe our work using analyses of amino acid coevolution to pinpoint the molecular basis of specificity in these proteins. This work has enabled the rational rewiring of protein-protein interactions and signal transduction pathways. Additionally, these studies have driven efforts to systematically map sequence spaces and probe the selective pressures and constraints that govern the evolution of protein-protein interactions.

"A stress-Induced Hidden Secret of the Genetic Code"

Type: Lecture
Date: Oct 22, 2017

Systems Biology innovative awards

Type: Lecture
Date: Sep 19, 2017

Imaging how cells decide their fate, shape and position in the early mouse embryo

Type: Lecture
Date: Sep 17, 2017

Time11:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerDr. Nicolas Plachta

ContactIngrid.lehrer@weizmann.ac.il

AbstractABSTRACT During development, each cell must resolve its fate, shape and position. Revealing how these decisions are made is critical to understand how embryos form, yet their real time control in mammals is unknown. Because fixed specimens cannot capture in vivo cell dynamics, we use imaging technologies to study single cells directly in live mouse embryos. We recently combined fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and photoactivation to show how the transcription factors Oct4 and Sox2 bind to DNA to determine the first cell fates of the embryo. We also designed methods to study how cells regulate their mechanical properties, and how they reorganize their actin and microtubule cytoskeletons to establish the first forms of tissue architecture. We discovered a new class of filopodia which helps cells to polarize and achieve embryo compaction, a role for cortical tension in driving the formation of the pluripotent inner mass, and a new type of non-centrosomal microtubule organizing center (MTOC) directing intracellular transport and differentiation in the embryo.

The surprising expansion of the epigenetic regulatory repertoire in mammals

Type: Lecture
Date: Sep 10, 2017

Virology Club speacial guest seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: Jul 13, 2017

Developmental Club Series 2016-2017

Type: Lecture
Date: Jul 12, 2017

To be announced

Type: Lecture
Date: Jul 02, 2017

To be announced

Type: Lecture
Date: Jul 02, 2017

To be announced

Type: Lecture
Date: Jul 02, 2017

Microbial Ecology Student's Club

Type: Lecture
Date: Jun 27, 2017

To be announced

Type: Lecture
Date: Jun 25, 2017

Developmental Club Series 2016-2017

Type: Lecture
Date: Jun 21, 2017

To be announced

Type: Lecture
Date: Jun 18, 2017

To be announced

Type: Lecture
Date: Jun 11, 2017

Developmental Club Series 2016-2017

Type: Lecture
Date: Jun 07, 2017

To be announced

Type: Lecture
Date: Jun 04, 2017

To be announced

Type: Lecture
Date: May 28, 2017

The Relation Between Cell Fusion and Aneuploidy

Type: Lecture
Date: May 16, 2017

Seminar

Type: Lecture
Date: Apr 27, 2017

Time10:00 - 11:00

LocationCamelia Botnar Building

LecturerJoanne Kamens, Ph.D.

Contactsandra.britton@weizmann.ac.il

AbstractTitle; ‘Sharing Speeds Science: Intro to Addgene's Nonprofit Science Model Info; addgene is a nonprofit organization founded to help scientists share materials and useful data across borders around the world. Addgene has distributed over 750,000 plasmids to scientists in 85 countries. This movement of samples has influenced fields from Stem Cells to CRISPR and almost everything in between. Addgene's Executive Director, Joanne Kamens will present on this unique compnay model, what's new with Addgene and about what it is like to be an Addgenie. Dr. Kamens is the Executive Director of Addgene, a mission driven, nonprofit dedicated to helping scientists around the world share useful research reagents and data. Dr. Kamens received her PhD in Genetics from Harvard Medical School then spent 15 years as a researcher and manager in Pharma at BASF/Abbott working on both small molecule and antibody therapies for immune disease. In 2007 she joined RXi Pharmaceuticals as Senior Director of Research Collaborations. Dr. Kamens founded the current Boston chapter of the Association for Women in Science. She has helped start and supports many scientist mentoring programs with training and best practices. In 2010, Dr. Kamens received the Catalyst Award from the Science Club for Girls for longstanding dedication to empowering women in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics and in 2013, she was named one of PharmaVoice's 100 Most Inspiring Commanders & Chiefs. She serves on a number of other non-profit boards and speaks widely on career development and workplace diversity topics in person and via Webinar.

To be announced

Type: Lecture
Date: Apr 09, 2017

Microbial Ecology Student's Club

Type: Lecture
Date: Mar 28, 2017

Science and Clinical Orthopedics

Type: Lecture
Date: Mar 05, 2017

The Impact of Ploidy on Adaptation

Type: Lecture
Date: Mar 02, 2017

New CRISPR-Cas systems from uncultivated microbes

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 08, 2017

2016

Engineering Human T Cell Circuitry

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 29, 2016

The regulatory role of short structural variants and the implication to neurodegenerative diseases in aging

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 22, 2016

Time10:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerProf. Ornit Chiba-Falek

Contactingrid.lehrer@weizmann.ac.il

AbstractIn the post genome-wide association studies (GWAS) era we are shifting gears toward translation of genetic disease loci to molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis and pinpointing the causal genetic factors and their functional effects. It has been suggested that changes, even subtle, in the expression levels of wild-type genes in the brain can, over years, lead to neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, differences in gene expression profiles between brain tissues from neurodegenerative disease patients compared to healthy controls have been reported. Short structural variants (SSVs) are short genomic variants (<50 bp) other than SNPs. Recently, there has been increased support for the idea that SSVs, which are largely ignored in large-scale genetic studies, may be involved in many complex diseases, and may also contribute significantly to variation in gene expression in human. We have been studying the expression regulation of key genes implicated in Alzheimer’s (AD) and Parkinson’s (PD) diseases and a wide-spectrum of related disorders. In particular, we focus on noncoding SSVs and their cis-regulatory effects on gene expression using a comprehensive strategy that combines multiple-level approaches. (1) in silico: we have developed a new bioinformatics tool for prioritizing candidate functional/causal SSVs. The tool is a searchable, annotated database of SSVs, with associated customizable scoring software that is designed to evaluate and prioritize SSVs that are most likely to have significant biological effects and impact on disease risk. (2) in vitro: we have established induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC)-derived neurons, dopaminergic and cholinergic, from a normal subject and PD patients. We are currently using this model system to determine how cis-variants modulate expression of disease risk genes via their interactions with the trans-acting factors, by applying CRISPR/Cas9 – mediated genome editing. (3) in vivo: we have quantified cell-type specific gene expression in neurons, astrocytes, and microglia by single-cell gene expression assays using cells isolated from frozen human brain samples via LCM. We have implemented this strategy in studies of genomic loci implicated in Lewy body and AD diseases, specifically SNCA gene and the TOMM40-APOE cluster. Collectively, the innovative approaches we developed represent a cohesive strategy for discovering potentially functional and causal variants within candidate risk-genes associated with AD-PD spectrum disorders.

Genetic media

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 19, 2016

Time14:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerProf. Yaniv Erlich

Contactcherill.banks@weizmann.ac.il

AbstractAbstract: In the last decade, the human population has produced zettabytes (10^21) of digital data. This creates immense opportunities and challenges for biology research. In this talk, I will present two research directions of my groups on the intersection between genetics and data, which we dub “genetic media”. First, I will speak about crowd sourcing massive genetic data using social media. We collected over 80 million profiles from the largest social-media website driven by genealogy and constructed a single family tree of 13 million people. Using this data, we analyzed the genetic architecture of longevity. I will also speak about our on-going efforts to crowd source genomes and social media phenotypes to this massive pedigree. In the second part of my talk, I will present using synthetic DNA as a medium for long-term data storage. Previous studies in leading journal have presented this concept but failed to show reliable data retrieval. Here, we report a storage strategy, called DNA Fountain, that is highly robust and approaches the Shannon limit. The success of our strategy relies on careful adaptation of coding theory to the domain-specific constraints of DNA molecules. To demonstrate its power, we stored a full computer operating system, movie, and other files in DNA oligos and perfectly retrieved the information. We explored the limit of our architecture in terms of bytes per molecules and obtained a perfect retrieval from a density of 215Petabyte/gram of DNA, orders of magnitudes higher than previous techniques.

In vivo veritas – Using CRISPR genome editing to model cancer in mice

Type: Lecture
Date: Nov 17, 2016

Time11:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerProf. Daniel Schramek

Contactingrid.lehrer@weizmann.ac.il

AbstractModern Genetics is revealing virtually all the genetic and epigenetic alterations associated with human malignancies. Mining this information for Precision Medicine is predicated on weeding out ‘bystander’ mutation and identifying the ‘driver’ mutations responsible for tumor initiation, progression and metastasis, as only the latter have diagnostic and therapeutic value. Secondly, we have to elucidate how driver mutations alter the fundamental molecular pathways governing tissue growth and identify actionable nodes within a given cancer gene network that can be exploited therapeutically. The massive quantity of data emerging from cancer genomics therefore demands a corresponding increase in the efficiency and throughput of in vivo models to comprehensively assess all putative cancer genes. We therefore developed a versatile functional genomics toolbox that enables us to generate and analyze thousands of somatic gene knock-out or overexpression clones within a single animal in a matter of weeks. Ultrasound-guided in utero injections allow us to selectively transduce fluorescently-labeled lentiviral CRISPR or ORF libraries into various organs of living mouse embryos. Subsequent mosaic analysis, next-generation sequencing and library barcode deconvolution enables us to identify genes that regulate proliferation, differentiation and survival. Of note, this analysis not only assess the gene function in an physiological and immune-competent microenvironment, but can also be combined with any mouse model and treatment schedule to faithfully model human malignancies. Using this technique, we have completed several proof-of-concept screens and elucidated several novel tumor suppressor genes in Head&Neck. Currently, we are performing several multiplexed in vivo CRISPR screens to uncover context-specific cancer vulnerabilities, novel immune regulators and genes that confer resistance to chemo- or targeted therapies. In this seminar, I will highlight the utility of direct in vivo screening to integrate human cancer genomics and mouse modeling for rapid and systematic discovery of cancer driver mutations and novel cancer vulnerabilities.

Following Single mRNAs in Living Cells

Type: Lecture
Date: Nov 14, 2016

RNA function in germ and stem cell biology

Type: Lecture
Date: Oct 18, 2016

Time10:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerProf. Dónal O'Carroll

Contactingrid.lehrer@weizmann.ac.il

AbstractThe integrity of the genome transmitted to the next generation intrinsically relies on cells of the germ line. Processes that ensure germ cell development, genomic stability, and reproductive lifespan are essential for the long-term success of a species. Dónal O'Carroll is interested in characterizing spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) populations that support fertility as well the regenerative capacity of the testis throughout adult life. In addition, O'Carroll lab tackles fundamental questions regarding the mammalian male germ line and heredity from an RNA perspective. Specifically, their research explores the contribution of non-coding RNA (miRNA, piRNA and lncRNA) and RNA modification pathways within germ cell development as well as testicular homeostasis/regeneration. The research objectives focus on the contribution of these emerging pathways on the underlying circuitry of self-renewal that underpins the SSC, as well as the coordination of the various cellular/differentiation processes of spermatogenesis.

Systems Biology Approach to the Mammalian Cell Cycle

Type: Lecture
Date: May 25, 2016

Metabolic approaches to the Microbiome

Type: Lecture
Date: May 25, 2016

Motor neurons get excited by a miRNA

Type: Lecture
Date: May 01, 2016

To be announced

Type: Lecture
Date: Apr 03, 2016

The Role of Filopodia in Muscle Cell Fusion

Type: Lecture
Date: Mar 27, 2016

To be announced

Type: Lecture
Date: Mar 13, 2016

Expression homeostasis during DNA replication

Type: Lecture
Date: Feb 28, 2016

Regulatory RNAs

Type: Lecture
Date: Feb 18, 2016

Buffering variability of morphogen gradients

Type: Lecture
Date: Feb 14, 2016

The Synaptonemal Complex is a Liquid Crystal

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 06, 2016

2015

To be announced

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 27, 2015

To be announced

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 06, 2015

The metamorphosis of the tendon-bone attachmen

Type: Lecture
Date: Nov 22, 2015

To be announced

Type: Lecture
Date: Oct 25, 2015

To be announced

Type: Lecture
Date: Oct 18, 2015

RUNX2015

Type: conference
Date: Oct 18, 2015

PacBio SMRT Sequencing overview

Type: Lecture
Date: Jul 29, 2015

Time09:30

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerAmos Grundwag, Eisenberg Bros. Ltd.

Contactingrid.lehrer@weizmann.ac.il

AbstractRecent advancements in our understanding of biological complexity have propelled the development of new tools. In the field of DNA and RNA sequencing, next-generation sequencers have dramatically increased productivity and provided novel insights into the structure and function of the genome. The PacBio RS II sequencing technology resolves single molecules in real time, allowing observation of structural and cell type variation not accessible with other technologies. These unique capabilities of the PacBio RS II system are ideally suited for a variety of applications, from De Novo assembly and targeted sequencing to detecting base modifications.

A Molecular Switch for Forming an Epithelial Tissue

Type: Lecture
Date: Jun 16, 2015

Ubiquitin controls autophagy termination

Type: Lecture
Date: Jun 11, 2015

Ten ways to use 100 million protein sequences

Type: Lecture
Date: Jun 11, 2015

Visualizing global transcription at nucleotide resolution

Type: Lecture
Date: Jun 11, 2015

Molecular Mechanisms ofTranscription in the Third Domain – from molecules to systems

Type: Lecture
Date: May 03, 2015

Time10:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerProf. Finn Werner

Contactcherill.banks@weizmann.ac.il

AbstractOur laboratory is applying an interdisciplinary and multi scalar approach to characterise the molecular mechanisms of transcription and in particular of multisubunit RNA polymerases (RNAPs). We explore model systems from the third domain of life, the Archaea, not only because they are fascinating organisms in their own right but because their transcription apparatus is a model system for &#8211; and more biochemically tractable than - eukaryotic RNAPII. Today I will present progress in our understanding of (i) the architecture of transcription initiation complexes, (ii) conformational dynamics of RNAP during the transcription cycle, and (iii) the whole genome-distribution of the basal transcription apparatus and transcription start site mapping. This analysis reveals the underlying molecular nature of the spontaneous DNA melting in archaea, which requires ATP hydrolysis in the RNAPII system. Our data furthermore show that the dynamic recruitment and release of basal factors that guide RNAP through the transcription cycle is modulated by the coupling of transcription and translation, of RNAPs and ribosomes.

Two2Many

Type: conference
Date: Mar 11, 2015

Deciphering and reversing the consequences of mitochondrial DNA damage

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 21, 2015

Time12:00

LocationArthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

LecturerDr. Cory Dunn

Contactmaya.schuldiner@weizmann.ac.il

AbstractMitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes several proteins playing key roles in bioenergetics. Pathological mutations of mtDNA can be inherited or may accumulate following treatment for viral infections or cancer. Furthermore, many organisms, including humans, accumulate significant mtDNA damage during their lifespan, and it is therefore possible that mtDNA mutations can promote the aging process. There are no effective treatments for most diseases caused by mtDNA mutation. An understanding of the cellular consequences of mtDNA damage is clearly imperative. Toward this goal, we use the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a cellular model of mitochondrial dysfunction. Genetic manipulation and biochemical study of this organism is easily achieved, and many proteins and processes important for mitochondrial biogenesis were first uncovered and best characterized using this experimental system. Importantly, current evidence suggests that processes required for survival of cells lacking a mitochondrial genome are widely conserved between yeast and other organisms, making likely the application of our findings to human health. I will discuss our most recent work related to the reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction. Specifically, we have found that reducing the acidity of the vacuole, the yeast analog of the mammalian lysosome, provides significant benefits to cells deleted of mtDNA. Moreover, our work demonstrates that perturbation of conserved signaling pathways involved in nutrient sensation can greatly increase the fitness of cells lacking a mitochondrial genome.

Regulating a Ubiquitin-Like Pathway In Autophagy

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 11, 2015

Polyamines and cellular differentiation

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 04, 2015

Polyamines and cellular differentiation

Type: Lecture
Date: Jan 04, 2015

2014

To be announced

Type: Lecture
Date: Dec 28, 2014

Proteasomes as substrate trappers

Type: Lecture
Date: Nov 23, 2014

Intrinsic Cellular Defense to HIV-1 Infection Drives CD4 T-Cell Depletion and Progression to AIDS

Type: Lecture
Date: Oct 26, 2014