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  • Date:22TuesdayJanuary 2019

    Synaptic tenacity: When everything changes, do things really stay the same?

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    Time
    12:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Brain Research
    Lecturer
    Prof. Noam Ziv
    Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Haifa
    Organizer
    Department of Neurobiology
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Benoziyo Brain Research Building Room 113 Host: Dr.Ivo Sp...»
    Benoziyo Brain Research Building Room 113

    Host: Dr.Ivo Spiegel ivo.spiegel@weizmann.ac.il tel: 4415
    For assistance with accessibility issues, please contact naomi.moses@weizmann.ac.il

    AbstractShow full text abstract about Activity-dependent modifications to synaptic connections – s...»
    Activity-dependent modifications to synaptic connections – synaptic plasticity – is widely believed to represent a fundamental mechanism for altering network function. This belief also implies, however, that synapses, when not driven to change their properties by physiologically relevant stimuli, should retain these properties over time. Otherwise, physiologically relevant modifications would be gradually lost amidst spurious changes and spontaneous drift. We refer to the capacity of synapses to maintain their properties over behaviorally relevant time scales as 'synaptic tenacity'.

    The seminar will examine the challenges to synaptic tenacity imposed by the short lifetimes of synaptic molecules, their inherent dynamics and the logistics of replenishing remote synapses with these molecules at appropriate amounts and stoichiometries. It will then examine the effects these processes have on the (in)stability of synaptic properties , on synaptic size configurations and distributions and on the scaling of these distributions. Finally, it will compare the magnitudes of synaptic changes driven by these processes to those of changes driven by deterministic, activity-dependent synaptic plasticity processes.

    Lecture
  • Date:22TuesdayJanuary 2019

    Special Guest Seminar with Prof. Meytal Landau

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    Time
    14:00
    Title
    Functional Protein Fibrils as Antibacterial Agents and Targets
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Meytal Landau
    Assistant Professor, Faculty of Biology, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Guest Lecture
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:22TuesdayJanuary 2019

    Seminar in Geometry and Topology

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    Time
    16:15 - 17:45
    Title
    On Taylor coefficients of smooth functions
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 1
    Lecturer
    Avner Kiro
    TAU
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of The talk will be about two classical problems in the theory ...»
    The talk will be about two classical problems in the theory of Carleman classes of smooth functions. The first one is to describe the image of a Carleman class under the Borel map (which maps a smooth function to its jet of Taylor coefficients at a given point). The second one concerns possible ways to construct a function in a given Carleman class with prescribed Taylor coefficients. I will present solutions to both problems. If time permits, I will also discuss related problems which originate in the singularity theory of Carleman classes.
    Lecture
  • Date:23WednesdayJanuary 2019

    Machine Learning and Statistics Seminar

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:15
    Title
    The Gaussian Maximum Likelihood Approach for Independent Component and Vector Analysis
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 1
    Lecturer
    Amir Weiss
    Tel Aviv University
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of The Blind Source Separation (BSS) problem consists of retrie...»
    The Blind Source Separation (BSS) problem consists of retrieving signals of interest, termed the sources, from a dataset consisting of their mixtures. One of the most popular and common paradigms for solving the BSS problem is Independent Component Analysis (ICA), where the sources are assumed to be (only) mutually statistically independent random processes, and the mixtures are assumed to be linear combinations thereof, where the linear mixing operator is unknown. In this talk, we shall start with the Gaussian Maximum Likelihood (GML) approach for the semi-blind problem, in which the sources are assumed to be temporally-diverse Gaussian processes. Based on the principles of this approach, we shall then discuss two extensions. First, the noisy Gaussian ICA problem, for which two asymptotically optimal solutions, w.r.t. two different optimality criteria, will be presented. We shall see (both analytically and empirically) that these solutions possess attractive properties even for non-Gaussian mixtures. Then, we shall consider the Independent Vector Analysis (IVA) framework, which has emerged in recent years as an extension of ICA into multiple datasets of mixtures. In IVA, the sources in each set are independent, but may depend on sources in the other sets. We will show that in IVA, the GML approach leads to consistent separation regardless of the sources' distributions.
    Lecture
  • Date:23WednesdayJanuary 2019

    Special Guest Seminar with Prof. Joel S. Bader

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    Time
    14:00
    Title
    “Identifying drivers of breast cancer metastasis”
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Joel S. Bader
    Johns Hopkins University, Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME) https://www.bme.jhu.edu/faculty_staff/joel-bader-phd/
    Organizer
    The Kahn Family Research Center for Systems Biology of the Human Cell
    Special Guest Seminar
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Most breast cancer deaths are from metastasis, rather than g...»
    Most breast cancer deaths are from metastasis, rather than growth of the primary tumor. Therapies for reducing deaths from metastatic cancer are limited, in part because much of the basic biology of metastasis remains unknown. We are developing and applying methods to identify these basic mechanisms. We describe work with experimental and clinical partners using organoids, clusters of 300-500 primary mammary cells, to interrogate metastasis-related phenotypes. We present new mathematical image processing methods that convert organoid images into quantitative invasion phenotypes. We then discuss genes and pathways whose activities lead to invasion, dissemination, and metastasis. Often the driver and effector genes are poor candidates for therapeutic intervention, but signaling intermediates can be targeted. We are prioritizing intermediates using new methods that characterize the density of paths through a biological network. We are recruiting women with breast cancer to participate in these studies as part of our US NCI Cancer Target Discovery & Development (CTD2) Center.

    Lecture
  • Date:23WednesdayJanuary 2019

    Algebraic Geometry and Representation Theory Seminar

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    Time
    15:30 - 16:30
    Title
    Symmetric tensor categories in positive characteristic
    Location
    The David Lopatie Hall of Graduate Studies
    Room A
    Lecturer
    Pavel Etingof
    MIT
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of I will talk about my joint work with Dave Benson which const...»
    I will talk about my joint work with Dave Benson which constructs new symmetric tensor categories in characteristic 2 arising from modular representation theory of elementary abelian 2-groups, and about its conjectural generalization to characteristic p
    Lecture
  • Date:24ThursdayJanuary 2019

    Gain Fat - Lose Metastasis: From cancer cell plasticity to differentiation theraphy

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Title
    Special Guest Seminar
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Dana Ishay Ronen
    Sourasky Medical Center
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:27SundayJanuary 2019

    Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2018-2019

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    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Maayan Barnea
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    DDP Seminar
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:27SundayJanuary 201901FridayFebruary 2019

    Time and fundamentals of quantum mechanics

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Chairperson
    Eli Pollak
    Homepage
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:27SundayJanuary 2019

    TBA

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    Time
    11:00
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Jiwchar Ganor
    BGU University
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:27SundayJanuary 2019

    Taming Frustration in Mechanical Metamaterials

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Prof. Yair Shokef
    School of Mechanical Engineering, TAU
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Soft Matter and Biomaterials
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about We study two- and three-dimensional mechanical metamaterials...»
    We study two- and three-dimensional mechanical metamaterials with anisotropic unit cells. When the orientation of each one is set at random they typically form a frustrated structure. We present a combinatorial strategy for the design of a multitude of aperiodic, yet frustration-free metamaterials that exhibit spatially textured functionalities. We demonstrate these by designing three-dimensional metacubes, which when compressed can deform to give any pre-defined texture on their faces. In two dimensions, we introduce topological defects possessing global frustration that cannot be removed by local structural changes. We uncover the distinct mechanical signature of topological defects by experiments and simulations, and leverage this to design complex metamaterials in which we can steer deformations and stresses towards parts of the system.

    Lecture
  • Date:27SundayJanuary 2019

    Morphing hard and soft matter by reaction-transport dynamics

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Dr. Nadir Kaplan
    Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Engineering next-generation materials that can grow into eff...»
    Engineering next-generation materials that can grow into efficient multitasking agents, move rapidly, or discern environmental cues greatly benefits from inspiration from biological systems. In the first part of my talk, I will present a geometrical theory that explains the biomineralization-inspired growth and form of carbonate-silica microarchitectures in a dynamic reaction-diffusion system. The theory predicts new self-assembly pathways of intricate morphologies and thereby guides the synthesis of light-guiding optical structures. The second part is dedicated to a soft matter analog of controlled actuation and complex sensing in living systems. Specifically, I will introduce a continuum framework of a simple hydrogel system that is activated upon transport and reaction of chemical stimuli. The hydrogel exhibits unique cascades of mechanical and optical responses, suggesting that common gels have a much larger sensing space than currently employed. The theoretical work presented in my talk is intimately connected to modern materials science. The effective convergence of theory and experiment paves the way for optimized hard or soft biomimetic materials for applications ranging from bottom-up manufacturing to soft robotics.
    Lecture
  • Date:27SundayJanuary 2019

    Diabesity-induced Chronic Kidney Disease: When Kidneys Get the Munchies

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    Time
    15:00 - 16:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Yossi Tam
    Organizer
    Life Sciences
    Metabollic Research Forum
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:27SundayJanuary 2019

    Diabesity-induced Chronic Kidney Disease: When Kidneys Get the Munchies

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    Time
    15:00 - 16:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Yossi Tam
    Organizer
    Life Sciences
    Metabollic Research Forum
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:28MondayJanuary 2019

    IMM Guest seminar-Dr. Vered Padler-Karavani will lecture on "Immunological responses against glycosylated biotherapeutics and biodevices in humans."

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    Time
    13:00
    Location
    Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Vered Padler-Karavani
    Departments of Cell Research & Immunology, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
    Organizer
    Department of Immunology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:28MondayJanuary 2019

    "Mechanisms of asymmetric cell division"

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    Time
    14:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Yves Barral
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:29TuesdayJanuary 2019

    Vascular-centered view on stem cell niches, aging and rejuvenation

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    Time
    09:00 - 10:00
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Prof. Eli Keshet
    Dept. of Developmental Biology & Cancer Research, Hadassah Medical School,HUJI
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of We would like to invite you to a new series of “Breakfast Se...»
    We would like to invite you to a new series of “Breakfast Seminars” focused on Stem Cells, Regeneration and Aging.
    These meetings are aimed to bring together researchers interested in all aspects of organ formation, physiology, pathology and regeneration.
    Meetings will be conducted monthly on Tuesdays, 9:00am in the Candiotty Auditorium.
    Breakfast (NY style…) will be served before the lecture.
    We hope to see you all,

    Karina Yaniv & Eldad Tzahor
    Lecture
  • Date:29TuesdayJanuary 2019

    A Clockwork Wikipedia: a case study into knowledge and facts in the digital age

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    Time
    10:00 - 10:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Rona Aviram
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences-WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about As people's trust in the facts the read on Wikipedia gr...»
    As people's trust in the facts the read on Wikipedia grows, we feel it is important to understand how it interacts with the sciences and academia - the origin of many of those facts. While most research on Wikipedia focuses on politically contentious articles,we focus on scientific articles to show how they are created in a dynamic process involving experts and laymen, in this case for circadian clocks.
    Lecture
  • Date:29TuesdayJanuary 2019

    Semaphorins – BDNF balance in the sexually dimorphic innervation of the mammary gland

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    Time
    10:30 - 11:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Hadas Sar Shalom
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences - WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The innervation of peripheral targets during embryonic devel...»
    The innervation of peripheral targets during embryonic development is largely regulated by the levels of target-derived trophic factors. But whether additional target-derived factors act in concert with these trophic factors and their identity is largely unknown. Sensory innervation of the mammary gland is controlled by Brain derived-neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and sexually dimorphic sequestering of BDNF by the truncated form of its receptor (TrkB.T1), directs male-specific axonal pruning in mice.
    In search for cues that control the innervation together with BDNF I have found specific, non-dimorphic, expression of Semaphorin family members in the mouse mammary gland, which signal through PlexinA4. PlexinA4 deletion in both female and male embryos caused developmental hyperinnervation of the gland, which could be reduced by genetic co-reduction of BDNF. Moreover, in males, PlexinA4 ablation delayed axonal pruning, independently of the initial levels of innervation.
    Overall, my study shows that precise sensory innervation of the mammary gland is regulated by the balance between trophic and repulsive signaling. Upon inhibition of trophic signaling, these repulsive factors are critical to promote axonal pruning.
    Lecture
  • Date:29TuesdayJanuary 2019

    Need for new theory and simulations to understand protein behavior in cells

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Prof. Gary J. Pielak
    Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences , Department of Structural Biology
    Contact
    Lecture

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