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  • Date:23ThursdayNovember 2017

    Geometric Functional Analysis and Probability Seminar

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    Time
    14:10 - 16:00
    Title
    Persistence of Gaussian Stationary Processes
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 290C
    Lecturer
    Naomi Feldheim
    WIS
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:26SundayNovember 2017

    Identification of Druggable and Redox vulnerabilities in a genetically defined cancer

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    Time
    10:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Liron Bar-Peled
    The Scripps Research Institute, Lallage Feazel Wall Fellow of the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Joint Seminar: Molecular Genetics and Biological Regulation ...»
    Joint Seminar: Molecular Genetics and Biological Regulation
    Lecture
  • Date:26SundayNovember 2017

    Terrestrial glints seen from deep space: cloud ice crystals detected from the 1st Lagrangian point

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    Time
    11:00
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Alex Kostinski
    Michigan Tech
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The deep space climate observatory (DSCOVR) spacecraft resid...»
    The deep space climate observatory (DSCOVR) spacecraft resides at the 1st Lagrangian point about one million miles from Earth, where roughly the solar pull balances the terrestrial one. A polychromatic imaging camera onboard delivers nearly hourly observations of the entire sun-lit face of the Earth. Many images contain surprisingly bright flashes of light over both ocean and land. We construct a yearlong time series of flash latitudes, scattering angles and oxygen absorption to demonstrate that the flashes over land are specular reflections off tiny cloud ice platelets. Such deep space detection of tropospheric ice can be used to constrain the likelihood of oriented crystals and their contribution to Earth albedo. These glints may help detecting starlight glints off faint companions in our search for habitable exoplanets.

    Lecture
  • Date:27MondayNovember 2017

    "Thinking outside the cell: Programmable DNA compartments"

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:15
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Prof. Roy Bar-Ziv
    Dept. of Chemical and Biological Physics, WIS
    Organizer
    Faculty of Chemistry
    Contact
    Colloquia
  • Date:27MondayNovember 2017

    Foundations of Computer Science Seminar

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    Time
    14:30 - 16:00
    Title
    Informational Bounds on Approximate Nash Equilibria
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 290C
    Lecturer
    Yakov Babichenko
    Technion
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:28TuesdayNovember 201730ThursdayNovember 2017

    NMRbox: A workshop on advanced processing in nuclear magnetic resonance

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Chairperson
    Lucio Frydman
    Conference
  • Date:28TuesdayNovember 2017

    Insights from deep mutational scanning experiments inform computational protein design

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    Time
    10:00 - 10:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Shira Warszawski
    Members - Dept. of Biomolecular Sciences-WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Improving the binding affinity of protein-protein interactio...»
    Improving the binding affinity of protein-protein interaction is a major challenge in research, therapeutics and drug development. In antibodies, the process of somatic hypermutation and clonal selection leads the B cells to express high affinity binders. However, an undesirable side-effect is that affinity-enhancing mutations may reduce stability. We used deep mutational scanning to systematically map the mutational tolerance of an antibody variable fragment (Fv), finding that 20% of affinity-enhancing mutations occur at the interface between the light and heavy chains, away from the antigen binding site.
    This interface mediates the interaction between the two chains that form the core of the antibody, and may therefore be responsible for both antibody stability and affinity. From the deep mutational scanning data, we learned general rules for stabilizing and improving the affinity of antibodies. Computational designed variants comprising 5-10 mutations in the light-heavy chain interface improve affinity by as much as an order of magnitude, and also improve thermal stability and aggregation resistance. Laborious cloning, selection, and sequence analysis can thus be averted through fully automated computational affinity and stability design.
    Lecture
  • Date:28TuesdayNovember 2017

    Epigenetics in action: how transcription of mRNAs regulates their translation and stability

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    Time
    10:30 - 11:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Boris Slobodin
    Members - Dept. of Biomolecular Sciences-WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:28TuesdayNovember 2017

    "Nucleosome mobility and gene expression regulation: insights from single molecule studies"

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Prof. Ariel Kaplan
    Technion
    Organizer
    Department of Structural Biology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:28TuesdayNovember 2017

    Jazz Show

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    Time
    16:30
    Location
    Michael and Anna Wix Auditorium
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of The faculty of mathematics and computer science Invite...»


    The faculty of mathematics and computer science
    Invites all Weizmann students, faculties and staff for a JAZZ SHOW with
    the famous Japanese pianist Haruka Yabuno and
    the amazing Ehud Ettun on double bass
    hosted by Prof. Tsachik Gelander on drums.

    Tuesday, November 28 2017

    Wix Auditorium

    16:30 refreshments
    17:00 Jazz show
    Jam session after the show (Jazz players are welcome to bring their instrument)

    The event is open to all
    F r e e a d m i s s i o n

    SPONSORED BY The Moross Research School of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Cultural Events
  • Date:29WednesdayNovember 2017

    Population as Distributed Memory System

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    Time
    11:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Ehud Lamm
    The Cohn Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Ideas, Tel Aviv University
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about We show how the distribution of skills or phenotypes in a po...»
    We show how the distribution of skills or phenotypes in a population acts as collective memory or "distributed information
    store" serving individual so that individuals with varying innate abilities are able to
    attain the mature fully skilled phenotype. We show how information moves "in" and "out" of genomes, relative to this memory system, elucidating how evolution determines where best to store information. This question applies to understanding diverse biological systems in which individuals acquire capacities from the population, including immunity, the microbiome, and social learning. Using Agent Based Modeling we investigate how properties of the
    population and social aspects of the acquisition process affect the behavior of the system. We show
    that the genetic properties of the population react predictably to changes in population properties that affect selection
    pressures, without any group level selective processes. Specifically, parameter changes that make
    acquisition slower lead to skills becoming increasingly innate while changes in parameters that improve
    the results of acquisition (e.g., making acquisition reliant on abundant left-over tools) lead
    to an increased reliance on acquisition, all while the average phenotype remains constant. The dynamics
    we study contribute to understanding how individuals can evolve to become more or less reliant on
    social learning and cultural information, how this depends on population properties (e.g., group
    size), and how this manifests demographically. The more information stored externally, the stronger
    the selection pressure on traits that support acquisition. Finally, we contrast our model and the Baldwin
    Effect and relate out results to the study of the evolution of human social learning.
    Lecture
  • Date:29WednesdayNovember 2017

    Machine Learning and Statistics Seminar

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:30
    Title
    Inverse Problems and Unsupervised Learning with applications to Cryo-Electron Microscopy (cryo-EM)
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 1
    Lecturer
    Roy Lederman
    Princeton University
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:29WednesdayNovember 2017

    In-cell NMR as a discovery tool: New biological functions for an old amyloid protein

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Title
    Special Guest Seminar
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Philipp Selenko
    In-cell NMR Spectroscopy, Leibniz Institute of Molecular Pharmacology (FMP Berlin)
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:30ThursdayNovember 2017

    Physics Colloquium

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:30
    Location
    Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    TBA
    Organizer
    Faculty of Physics
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of 11:00 Coffee, Tea and more ...»
    11:00 Coffee, Tea and more
    AbstractShow full text abstract about TBA ...»
    TBA
    Colloquia
  • Date:30ThursdayNovember 2017

    Integrating genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of MAP kinase pathway targeted therapy resistance toward rational combination therapies

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Title
    Cancer Research Club
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Prof. Keith T. Flaherty
    Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center Harvard Medical School, USA
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Efforts to describe mechanisms of de novo and adaptive resis...»
    Efforts to describe mechanisms of de novo and adaptive resistance to BRAF and MEK inhibitors in melanoma have provided evidence of a convergent resistance phenotype defined by neural crest markers. Cells with this phenotype have been described as slowly cycling and invasive in comparison to isogenic cells with expressing melanocyte differentiation markers. Additionally, these neural crest-like cells utilize receptor tyrosine signaling to drive survival pathways and oxidative phosphorylation as their primary metabolic feature. These insights have provided new leads for therapeutic intervention to target these resistant cells. In parallel work, tumors that are not responsive to immune checkpoint antibodies have been found to have many of the same features: most notably loss of melanocyte lineage antigens and expression of neural crest markers. These data suggest that similar next-generation therapeutic strategies aimed at overcoming therapeutic resistance may be useful in combination with both MAPK pathway and immune checkpoint inhibitors.
    Lecture
  • Date:30ThursdayNovember 2017

    Pelletron meeting - by invitation only

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    Time
    16:00 - 17:45
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:03SundayDecember 2017

    Aerosol-cloud-precipitation interaction in eastern China: observations and modelling analyses

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    Time
    11:00
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Prof Jianping Guo
    State Key Laboratory of Severe Weather in the Chinese Academy of Meteorological Science
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:03SundayDecember 2017

    Neutron star mergers: gravitational waves and nucleosynthesis of heavy elements

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    Time
    13:00 - 14:00
    Location
    Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Eli Waxman, Avishay Gal Yam, Eran Ofek, Doron Kushnir
    WIS
    Organizer
    Faculty of Physics
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about : In this special event, motivated by the 2017 Physics Nobel...»
    : In this special event, motivated by the 2017 Physics Nobel prize and the recent first
    detection of a neutron star merger via both gravitational waves and electromagnetic radiation,
    we will review the recent discovery and its implications.
    Colloquia
  • Date:04MondayDecember 2017

    The Atmosphere as a Dynamical System: a Happy Tale of Theory Matching Reality

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    Time
    10:00
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Gabriele Messori
    Stockholm University
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Atmospheric flows are characterized by chaotic dynamics and ...»
    Atmospheric flows are characterized by chaotic dynamics and recurring large-scale patterns. These two characteristics point to the existence of an atmospheric attractor defined by Lorenz as: “the collection of all states that the system can assume or approach again and again, as opposed to those that it will ultimately avoid”. While this dynamical systems perspective can seem horribly abstract, it has immediate applications to the study of large-scale atmospheric patterns and extreme weather events. I will first show that we can compute measures of the stability and complexity (dimension) of instantaneous atmospheric fields in a (relatively) easy way. Next, I hope to convince you that these two quantities are actually useful! Their extreme values correspond to specific large-scale atmospheric patterns, and match extreme weather occurrences. They can also be used to identify "maximum predictability" states of the atmosphere, where the flow at positive lags of up to one week is particularly stable and with a small number of degrees of freedom. Finally, there is a significant correlation between the time series of instantaneous stability and complexity of an atmospheric field and the mean spread at lead times of over two weeks of an operational ensemble weather forecast initialised from that state.

    Lecture
  • Date:04MondayDecember 2017

    G-INCPM Special Seminar - Dr. Tamar Paz-Elizur, Dept. of Biomolecular Sciences, Weizmann - "Translating DNA repair for the battle against lung cancer"

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:15
    Location
    Nancy and Stephen Grand Israel National Center for Personalized Medicine
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Tamar Paz
    Dept. of Biomolecular Sciences
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about DNA repair is a key mechanism for eliminating DNA damage and...»
    DNA repair is a key mechanism for eliminating DNA damage and preventing mutations, and is therefore a major natural defense mechanism against cancer. With the goal of exploring the role of DNA repair in sporadic cancer we have developed a panel of functional DNA repair assays, highly reproducible and robust, that enable us to measure the activity of specific DNA repair enzymes directed towards oxidative lesions. In my talk, I will describe the results of two epidemiological/clinical blinded case-control studies, conducted in Israel and in the UK, showing that lung cancer patients have imbalanced DNA repair capacity compare to healthy people. The potential use of these DNA repair biomarkers in lung cancer prevention, early detection & therapy will be discussed.
    Lecture

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