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  • Date:28ThursdayMarch 2019

    Physics Colloquium

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:30
    Location
    Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Andrei bernevig
    Princeton
    Organizer
    Faculty of Physics
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of 11:00 – coffee, tea, and more...»
    11:00 – coffee, tea, and more
    AbstractShow full text abstract about TBA ...»
    TBA
    Colloquia
  • Date:28ThursdayMarch 2019

    Why do we fracture our hips? An evolutionary medicine approach to femoral neck fractures in modern humans

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    Time
    13:00 - 14:00
    Location
    Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for Archaeological Science
    Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Hadas Avni
    Tel Aviv University
    Organizer
    Academic Educational Research
    The Scientific Archaeology Unit
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:28ThursdayMarch 2019

    Mapping the Breakome of Cancer Cells: What Lessons have we Learned?

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Title
    Cancer Research Club
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Rami Aqeilan
    Chairman, Division of Cell biology, Immunology and Cancer Research, Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:28ThursdayMarch 2019

    Pelletron meeting - by invitation only

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    Time
    16:00 - 17:45
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:31SundayMarch 201901MondayApril 2019

    1st Israeli Flow Cytometry Conference

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    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Organizer
    Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities
    Homepage
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:31SundayMarch 201901MondayApril 2019

    1st Israeli Flow Cytometry Meeting

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Chairperson
    Ziv Porat
    Organizer
    Department of Immunology
    Homepage
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:31SundayMarch 2019

    Physical modelling of canopy flows

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    Time
    11:00
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Yardena Raviv
    Biological Institute
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:31SundayMarch 2019

    Geometry, defects and motion in active matter

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    Time
    13:00
    Location
    Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Drory Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Luca Giomi
    Leiden University
    Organizer
    Department of Physics of Complex Systems
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The paradigm of “active matter” has had notable successes ov...»
    The paradigm of “active matter” has had notable successes over the past decade in describing self-organization in a surprisingly broad class of biological and bio-inspired systems: from flocks of starlings to robots, down to bacterial colonies, motile colloids and the cell cytoskeleton. Active systems are generic non-equilibrium assemblies of anisotropic components that are able to convert stored or ambient energy into motion. In this talk, I will discuss some recent theoretical and experimental work on active nematic liquid crystals confined on two-dimensional curved interfaces and highlight how the geometrical and topological structure of the environment can substantially affect collective motion in active materials, leading to spectacular life-like functionalities.

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  • Date:31SundayMarch 2019

    What makes a good solar cell?

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Prof. Thomas Kirchartz
    Forschungszentrum Jülich
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about For the purpose of identifying novel absorber materials base...»
    For the purpose of identifying novel absorber materials based on experimental or computational material screening, it is useful to identify the basic ingredients required to make a good solar cell out of the combination of different absorber and contact materials. Figures of merit are needed that quantify whether a certain material is likely to perform well as a solar cell. To answer the question, which parameters are most important, we look into the key properties of good solar cells such as high absorption coefficient, mobility and charge carrier lifetime and study their interdependences and how they determine the efficiency at different thickness of the solar cell. Finally, we study some microscopic parameters such as the effective mass or electron-phonon coupling in a device to identify key microscopic properties that are likely to lead to a combination of high absorption, high mobilities and long lifetimes and thereby high photovoltaic efficiencies
    Lecture
  • Date:31SundayMarch 2019

    glucose-dependent insulinotrophic polypeptide (GIP )regulates whole body energy homeostasis via its effects on immune cells

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    Time
    15:00 - 16:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Sigal Fishman
    The Research Center for Digestive Tract & Liver Diseases Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center Department of Clinical Microbiology & Immunology Sackler Faculty of Medicine, TAU, Israel
    Organizer
    Life Sciences
    Metabollic Research Forum
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:31SundayMarch 2019

    Molecules in Large and Small Pores as Observed by NMR Spectroscopy. Pore Structure, Tortuosity and Molecular Interactions

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    Time
    15:30 - 16:30
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Prof. Istvan Furo
    Department of Chemistry, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    The Helen and Martin Kimmel Institute for Magnetic Resonance
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The seminar summarizes three recent studies (1,2,3) since ...»

    The seminar summarizes three recent studies (1,2,3) since that share some common elements: they concern porous materials and the method used is NMR spectroscopy. Yet, the aims differ. In the first study (1), the unknown is the pore structure. In particular, pore structure in hydrogels is difficult to access as water cannot be removed without affecting the pores and in the presence of water the well-honed gas sorption and mercury porosimetries just do not work. The method we invented to remedy this situation is called size-exclusion quantification (SEQ) NMR and it can be seen as the multiplexed analogue of inverse size exclusion chromatography. In effect, we sample by diffusion NMR the size distribution in a polydisperse polymer solution before and after it had been equilibrated with a porous matrix. Size-dependent polymer ingress reveals the pore structure. The method has several advantages over possible alternatives, not least its speed. In the second study (2), we sample the self-diffusion of neat water and other molecules like dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and their mixtures by NMR diffusion experiments for those fluids imbibed into controlled pore glasses (CPG, pore size range 7.5 to 73 nm). Their highly interconnected structure is scaled by pore size and exhibits pore topology independent of size. Relative to the respective diffusion coefficients obtained in bulk phases, we observe a reduction in the diffusion coefficient that is independent of pore size for the larger pores and becomes stronger toward the smaller pores. Geometric tortuosity governs the behavior at larger pore sizes, while the interaction with pore walls becomes the dominant factor toward smaller pore diameters. Deviation from the trends predicted by the popular Renkin equation and variants (4) indicates that the interaction with the pore wall is not just a simple steric one. In the third study (3), the porous material is hydrated cellulose. In that matrix, we identify by using 2H MAS NMR two different groups of water molecules being in slow exchange with each other. Water molecules in one of the groups exhibit anisotropic molecular motions with a high order parameter. Based on, among other things, the observed behavior with increasing vapor pressure, we argue that this water is an integral structural element of the cellulose fibril, that itself is an aggregate of the basic units, the cellulose nanofibrils.
    Lecture
  • Date:01MondayApril 2019

    Imaging phase transitions with scanning SQUID

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Prof. Beena Kalisky
    Dep. of Physics and Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Bar Ilan University
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about We use a local magnetic imaging technique, scanning SQUID ...»

    We use a local magnetic imaging technique, scanning SQUID microscopy, to map the spatial distribution of electronic states near surfaces and interfaces. We track conductivity, superconductivity and magnetism in systems undergoing phase transitions, where the local picture is particularly meaningful. I will describe two measurements: At the superconductor-insulator transition in NbTiN we map superconducting fluctuations and detect a non-trivial behavior near the quantum critical point. Near the metal to insulator transition at the 2D LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface, we find that the conduction landscape changes dramatically and identify the way different types of defects control the behavior.
    Lecture
  • Date:02TuesdayApril 2019

    Scientific Council meeting

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    Time
    14:00 - 16:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Contact
    Academic Events
  • Date:02TuesdayApril 2019

    Toward a high-fidelity artificial retina

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    Time
    14:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. E. J. Chichilnisky
    Neurosurgery, Stanford University
    Organizer
    Department of Neurobiology
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Prof. Elad Schneidman elad.schneidman@weizmann.ac.il ...»
    Host: Prof. Elad Schneidman elad.schneidman@weizmann.ac.il tel: 2239

    For assistance with accessibility issues, please contact naomi.moses@weizmann.ac.il
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Retinal prostheses represent an exciting development in scie...»
    Retinal prostheses represent an exciting development in science, engineering, and medicine – an opportunity to exploit our knowledge of neural circuitry and function to restore or even enhance vision. However, although existing retinal prostheses demonstrate proof of principle in treating incurable blindness, they produce limited visual function. Some of the reasons for this can be understood based on the exquisitely precise and specific neural circuitry that mediates visual signaling in the retina. Consideration of this circuitry suggests that future devices may need to operate at single-cell, single-spike resolution in order to mediate naturalistic visual function. I will show large-scale multi-electrode recording and stimulation data from the primate retina indicating that, in some cases, such resolution is possible. I will also discuss cases in which it fails, and propose that we can improve artificial vision in such conditions by incorporating our knowledge of the visual system in bi-directional devices that adapt to the host neural circuity. Finally, I will briefly discuss the potential implications for other neural interfaces of the future.
    Lecture
  • Date:03WednesdayApril 201904ThursdayApril 2019

    Metazoan Evolution: from early multicellularity to humans

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Chairperson
    Shiri Kult
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:03WednesdayApril 2019

    Developmental Club Series 2018-2019

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    Time
    10:00
    Title
    Small proteins with big roles – from coordinating cell migration to mediating species-specific fertilization
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Andrea Pauli
    IMP, Research Institute of Molecular Pathology GmbH
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Developmental Club
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:04ThursdayApril 2019

    Special guest seminar

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    Time
    10:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Andrea Pauli
    https://www.imp.ac.at/groups/andrea-pauli/members/
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:04ThursdayApril 2019

    Chemical and Biological Physics Guest Seminar

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    Time
    11:00
    Title
    Active vesicles as model systems for cell motility
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Dr. Thorsten Auth
    Forschungszentrum Julich
    Organizer
    Department of Chemical and Biological Physics
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The cytoskeleton is a highly dynamic three-dimensional netwo...»
    The cytoskeleton is a highly dynamic three-dimensional network of polar filamentous proteins and molecular motors. It provides structural stability for biological cells and it also generates and transmits mechanical forces. For example, in mesenchymal cell motility actin filaments polymerize at their plus ends, which exerts pushing forces on the cell membrane. Here, we present a generic two-dimensional model for an active vesicle, where self-propelled filaments attached to semiflexible polymer rings form mechanosensitive self-propelled agents. We find universal correlations between shape and motility. To probe the internal dynamics of flexocytes, we study the effect of substrate patterning on their mechanical response. The active vesicles reproduce experimentally observed shapes and motility patterns of biological cells. They assume circular, keratocyte-like, and neutrophil-like shapes and show both persistent random and circling motion. Interestingly, explicit pulling forces only are sufficient to reproduce this cell-like behavior. Also for the reflection of the vesicles at walls and the deflection of their trajectories at friction interfaces we find parallels to the behavior of biological cells. Our model may thus serve as a filament-based, minimal model for cell motility.
    Lecture
  • Date:04ThursdayApril 2019

    Physics Colloquium

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:30
    Location
    Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Philip Walter
    Organizer
    Faculty of Physics
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about TBA ...»
    TBA
    Colloquia
  • Date:04ThursdayApril 2019

    Considering alternatives to targeted therapy of cancer

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Yinon Ben-Neriah
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    Lecture

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