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  • Date:13TuesdayNovember 2018

    Chemical and Biological Physics Special Seminar

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    Time
    10:30
    Title
    Studying cell dynamics using Quantitative Phase Imaging (QPI)
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Prof. Gabriel Popescu
    Quantitative Light Imaging Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Organizer
    Department of Chemical and Biological Physics
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Light scattering limits the quality of optical imaging of un...»
    Light scattering limits the quality of optical imaging of unlabeled biospecimens: too little
    scattering and the sample is transparent, exhibiting low contrast, and too much scattering
    washes the structure information altogether. Recent advances in QPI, an approach by which
    the pathlength shifts induced by a specimen are mapped at each point in the field of view,
    allow us to connect the two regimes. We developed spatial light interference microscopy
    (SLIM) as a high-sensitivity, high-resolution QPI method, which open new applications for
    studying structure and dynamics. SLIM provides interesting data on cell growth and
    intracellular transport, specifically, it distinguishes between random and deterministic cargo
    motion. We measured subtle vesicle transport changes following optogenetic stimulation of
    live cells. Based on principles of holography, we developed a new optical technique for
    measuring cell traction. We performed simultaneous measurements of cell growth and cellgenerated
    forces and showed their evolution during cell differentiation. However, SLIM
    works best for thin specimens, such as single cell layers and tissue slices. To expand this type
    of imaging to thick, multiply scattering media, we developed gradient light interference
    microcopy (GLIM). GLIM is capable of suppressing the incoherent background due to
    multiple scattering. We demonstrate the use of GLIM to image various samples bovine
    embryos and live brain slices. Intrinsic dynamic markers promise to provide information
    about embryo viability, prior to implantation.
    Lecture
  • Date:13TuesdayNovember 2018

    Regulation of bidirectional motility of kinesin-5 motors

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Prof. Leah Gheber
    Organizer
    Department of Structural Biology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:14WednesdayNovember 2018

    Perception and retinal integration of rod and cone signals in primate

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    Time
    12:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Brain Research
    Lecturer
    Dr. William Grimes
    NINDS/NIH
    Organizer
    Department of Neurobiology
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Benoziyo Brain Research Building Room 113 Host: Dr. Micha...»
    Benoziyo Brain Research Building Room 113

    Host: Dr. Michal Rivlin michal.rivlin@weizmann.ac.il tel: 2792

    For assistance with accessibility issues, please contact naomi.moses@weizmann.ac.il

    AbstractShow full text abstract about Over the course of a natural day-night cycle, mean luminance...»
    Over the course of a natural day-night cycle, mean luminance levels can span ten log units or more. Mammalian retinas effectively encode visual information over this vast range, in part by utilizing exquisitely sensitive rod photoreceptors in dim conditions and multiple color-variant cone photoreceptors in bright conditions. These visual signals, regardless of origin, must pass through a common set of retinal ganglion cells, thereby creating opportunities for signal interactions. Human perceptual experiments conducted under intermediate lighting conditions reveal constructive and destructive interactions between flickering rod and cone stimuli that are thought to originate in the retina. In support of this hypothesis, we find rod-cone flicker interference in On and Off retinal ganglion cells that project! to magnocellular visual pathways in primates. The dependence of this interference on the frequency and phase of the temporal modulation is similar to that observed in perceptual measurements. Recordings from within the retinal circuitry indicate that rod-cone signal interference reflects a linear combination of kinetically-distinct rod and cone signals upstream of the ganglion cell synaptic inputs. Ultimately, using our empirically-derived data as a foundation, we construct a mathematical model that recapitulates known rod-cone interactions and predicts retinal output in response to a broad range of time-varying rod and cone stimuli.
    Lecture
  • Date:15ThursdayNovember 2018

    Cancer Volatolomics: From Evidence to Point-of-Care Diagnostics

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Title
    Cancer Research Club
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Hossam Haick
    Department of Chemical Engineering and the Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The current talk will present evidences that each cancer has...»
    The current talk will present evidences that each cancer has its own unique volatile molecular print and, therefore, the presence of one cancer would not screen out others. Based on this concept, a new generation of biomedical devices for achieving personalized diagnosis of various cancers in a noninvasive, inexpensive and portable manner via various body fluids (e.g., breath or skin) will be presented and discussed.
    Lecture
  • Date:18SundayNovember 201823FridayNovember 2018

    5th European Conference on Trapped ions

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Chairperson
    Roee Ozeri
    Homepage
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:18SundayNovember 2018

    TBA

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    Time
    11:00
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Rei Chemke
    Columbia University
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:18SundayNovember 2018

    Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2018-2019

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    Time
    13:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Neta Rahimi
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Student and Post-Doc Seminar
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:20TuesdayNovember 2018

    Nuclear Genome Nanostructure Imaging at Single Molecule Resolution

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    Time
    10:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Christoph Cremer
    1Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB) & Max-Planck Institute for Chemistry, D-55128 Mainz/Germany; 2Institute for Pharmacy and Molecular Biotechnology (IPMB), University Heidelberg & Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics (KIP), D-69120 Heidelberg/Germany e-mail: c.cremer@imb-mainz.de; cremer@kip.uni-heidelberg.de www.optics.imb-mainz.de
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Special Guest Seminar
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy allows quantitative...»
    Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy allows quantitative studies of nuclear genome organization on the nanoscale1. Here we report on results obtained by single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM). SMLM has made possible to explore chromatin nanostructure down to the imaging of single histones, of short oligosequences, or single DNA sites; presently, an intranuclear optical resolution down to the 5 nm range has been achieved. Applying a novel SMLM technique (fBALM)2, the DNA distribution across entire nuclei at nanoscale resolution was quantitatively determined, localizing in individual nuclear optical sections up to ~4 million individual DNA bound single fluorophore molecule positions, corresponding to about one position per nucleosome. Intensity profile analyses of the intranuclear DNA distributions indicated sharp transitions between high-density domains and low-density compartments, with differences up to almost two orders of magnitude; compacted regions had a minimum diameter down to ca. 50 nm diameter. In contrast to these results, conventional resolution imaging of the same nuclear sites indicated only small differences in the compaction of different regions, combined with very smooth density transitions. Taken together, the quantitative compaction estimates support models of a nuclear organization based on highly compartmentalized chromatin nanostructures3.
    Lecture
  • Date:25SundayNovember 2018

    TBA

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    Time
    11:00
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Yaron Katzir
    BGU
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:26MondayNovember 2018

    Annual meeting of the ISBMB

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    Time
    08:00 - 17:30
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Chairperson
    Yifat Merbl
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:26MondayNovember 2018

    Chemistry Colloquium

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:15
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Prof. Dek Woolfson
    University of Bristol
    Organizer
    Faculty of Chemistry
    Contact
    Colloquia
  • Date:26MondayNovember 2018

    2018 Weizmann Memorial Lecture

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    Time
    15:00 - 16:30
    Location
    Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. William Eaton
    Searching for a drug to treat sickle cell anemia: the first ‘molecular disease’
    Contact
    Academic Events
  • Date:27TuesdayNovember 201829ThursdayNovember 2018

    Frontiers in Chemistry: From Supramolecular towards Systems Chemistry

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    Time
    08:00 - 17:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Auditorium
    Chairperson
    Rafal Klajn
    Homepage
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:28WednesdayNovember 2018

    Developmental Club Series 2018-2019

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    Time
    10:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Nathan Lawson
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Developmental Club
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:28WednesdayNovember 2018

    2018 Weizmann Memorial Lecture

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    Time
    15:00 - 16:30
    Location
    Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. William Eaton
    Modern protein folding kinetics: a retrospective
    Contact
    Academic Events
  • Date:29ThursdayNovember 2018

    Physics Colloquium

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:30
    Location
    Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Binghai Yan
    WIS
    Organizer
    Faculty of Physics
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of 11:00 – coffee, tea, and more...»
    11:00 – coffee, tea, and more
    AbstractShow full text abstract about TBA ...»
    TBA
    Colloquia
  • Date:29ThursdayNovember 2018

    TBA

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Title
    Special Guest Seminar
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Oded Rechavi
    Tel Aviv University
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:02SundayDecember 2018

    TBA

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    Time
    11:00
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Karin Ardon-Dryer
    Texas Tech University
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:03MondayDecember 201807FridayDecember 2018

    Advances in Drug Discovery

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Chairperson
    Nir London
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:05WednesdayDecember 2018

    Developmental Club Series 2018-2019, special guest seminar

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    Time
    10:00
    Title
    “Lineage segregation of three germ layers in post-implantation mouse embryos”
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Naihe Jing
    Shanghai Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Developmental Club
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about During postimplantation development of the mouse embryo, des...»
    During postimplantation development of the mouse embryo, descendants of the inner cell mass cells in the early epiblast transit from the naïve pluripotent state to the primed pluripotent state. Concurrent with the transition of the pluripotency states is the specification of cell lineages and formation of germ layers in the embryos that serves as the blueprint for embryogenesis. Fate mapping and lineage analysis studies have revealed that cells in different regions of the germ layers acquire location-specific cell fates during gastrulation. The regionalization of cell fates heralding the formation of the basic body plan is conserved in vertebrate embryos at a common phylotypic stage of development. Knowledge of the molecular regulation that underpins the lineage specification and tissue patterning is instrumental for understanding embryonic programming and stem cell-based translational study. However, a genome-wide molecular annotation of lineage segregation and tissue architecture of post-implantation embryo has yet to be undertaken. Here, we reported a spatially resolved transcriptome of cell populations at defined positions in the germ layers over the period of pre- to late gastrulation development. This spatio-temporal transcriptome provides high resolution digitized in situ gene expression profiles and defines the molecular attribute of the genealogy of lineages and continuum of pluripotency states in time and space. The transcriptome further identifies the networks of molecular determinants that drive lineage specification and tissue patterning in the early postimplantation mouse embryo.
    Lecture

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