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  • Date:03SundayDecember 2017

    Neutron star mergers: gravitational waves and nucleosynthesis of heavy elements

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    Time
    13:00 - 14:00
    Location
    Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Eli Waxman, Avishay Gal Yam, Eran Ofek, Doron Kushnir
    WIS
    Organizer
    Faculty of Physics
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about : In this special event, motivated by the 2017 Physics Nobel...»
    : In this special event, motivated by the 2017 Physics Nobel prize and the recent first
    detection of a neutron star merger via both gravitational waves and electromagnetic radiation,
    we will review the recent discovery and its implications.
    Colloquia
  • Date:04MondayDecember 2017

    The Atmosphere as a Dynamical System: a Happy Tale of Theory Matching Reality

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    Time
    10:00
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Gabriele Messori
    Stockholm University
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Atmospheric flows are characterized by chaotic dynamics and ...»
    Atmospheric flows are characterized by chaotic dynamics and recurring large-scale patterns. These two characteristics point to the existence of an atmospheric attractor defined by Lorenz as: “the collection of all states that the system can assume or approach again and again, as opposed to those that it will ultimately avoid”. While this dynamical systems perspective can seem horribly abstract, it has immediate applications to the study of large-scale atmospheric patterns and extreme weather events. I will first show that we can compute measures of the stability and complexity (dimension) of instantaneous atmospheric fields in a (relatively) easy way. Next, I hope to convince you that these two quantities are actually useful! Their extreme values correspond to specific large-scale atmospheric patterns, and match extreme weather occurrences. They can also be used to identify "maximum predictability" states of the atmosphere, where the flow at positive lags of up to one week is particularly stable and with a small number of degrees of freedom. Finally, there is a significant correlation between the time series of instantaneous stability and complexity of an atmospheric field and the mean spread at lead times of over two weeks of an operational ensemble weather forecast initialised from that state.

    Lecture
  • Date:04MondayDecember 2017

    Life Science Colloquium

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Title
    Imaging Immunity – Using Advanced Optical Microscopy to Develop a Spatiotemporal Understanding of Host Defense
    Location
    Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Ronald Germain
    NIH Distinguished Investigator Chief, Laboratory of Systems Biology (LSB) Chief, Lymphocyte Biology Section, LSB Acting Chief, Laboratory of Immunology Associate Director, Trans-NIH Center for Human Immunology (CHI) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases National Institutes of Health
    Organizer
    Life Sciences
    Contact
    Colloquia
  • Date:04MondayDecember 2017

    G-INCPM Special Seminar - Dr. Tamar Paz-Elizur, Dept. of Biomolecular Sciences, Weizmann - "Translating DNA repair for the battle against lung cancer"

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:15
    Location
    Nancy and Stephen Grand Israel National Center for Personalized Medicine
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Tamar Paz
    Dept. of Biomolecular Sciences
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about DNA repair is a key mechanism for eliminating DNA damage and...»
    DNA repair is a key mechanism for eliminating DNA damage and preventing mutations, and is therefore a major natural defense mechanism against cancer. With the goal of exploring the role of DNA repair in sporadic cancer we have developed a panel of functional DNA repair assays, highly reproducible and robust, that enable us to measure the activity of specific DNA repair enzymes directed towards oxidative lesions. In my talk, I will describe the results of two epidemiological/clinical blinded case-control studies, conducted in Israel and in the UK, showing that lung cancer patients have imbalanced DNA repair capacity compare to healthy people. The potential use of these DNA repair biomarkers in lung cancer prevention, early detection & therapy will be discussed.
    Lecture
  • Date:04MondayDecember 2017

    Surfaces spanning composition and structure space: From corrosion to enantioselectivity

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:15
    Title
    Chemistry colloquium
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Prof. Andrew J. Gellman
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University
    Organizer
    Faculty of Chemistry
    Contact
    Colloquia
  • Date:04MondayDecember 2017

    Life Sciences Faculties' Council

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    Time
    15:00 - 18:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Contact
    Academic Events
  • Date:05TuesdayDecember 2017

    Frontiers in Systems Biology: Prof. Jörg Vogel

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    Time
    10:00 - 11:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Jörg Vogel
    Institut für Molekulare Infektionsbiologie, Germany
    Organizer
    The Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:05TuesdayDecember 2017

    Activity-based proteomics – protein and ligand discovery on a global scale

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Benjamin F. Cravatt
    Dept. of Molecular Medicine The Scripps Research Institute,CA
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Genome sequencing projects have revealed that eukaryotic and...»
    Genome sequencing projects have revealed that eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms universally possess a huge number of uncharacterized proteins. The functional annotation of these proteins should enrich our knowledge of the biochemical pathways that support human physiology and disease, as well as lead to the discovery of new therapeutic targets. To address these problems, we have introduced chemical proteomic technologies that globally profile the functional state of proteins in native biological systems. Prominent among these methods is activity-based protein profiling (ABPP), which utilizes chemical probes to map the activity state of large numbers of proteins in parallel. In this lecture, I will describe the application of ABPP to discover and functionally annotate proteins in mammalian physiology and disease. I will also discuss the generation and implementation of advanced ABPP platforms for proteome-wide ligand discovery.

    Lecture
  • Date:05TuesdayDecember 2017

    Mathematical Analysis and Applications Seminar

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:15
    Title
    Spectral asymptotic for Steklov’s problem in domains with edges (work in progress)
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 1
    Lecturer
    Victor Ivrii
    University of Toronto
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about We derive sharp eigenvalue asymptotics for Dirichlet-to-Neum...»
    We derive sharp eigenvalue asymptotics for Dirichlet-to-Neumann operator in the domain with edges and discuss obstacle for deriving the second term
    Lecture
  • Date:06WednesdayDecember 2017

    Developmental Club Series 2017-2018

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    Time
    10:00 - 11:00
    Title
    Sexual dimorphism: from molecules and synapses to circuits and behaviors
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr.Meital Oren
    Department of Neurobiology
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:06WednesdayDecember 2017

    Chemical and Biological Physics Lunch Club Seminar

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    Time
    12:30
    Title
    Instability in dynamic fracture and the failure of the classical theory of cracks
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Lecturer
    Chih-Hung Chen (Northeastern), Yuri Lubomirsky (Weizmann) and Alain Karma ‎‎(Northeastern)‎
    A tutorial-like talk
    Organizer
    Department of Chemical and Biological Physics
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Cracks, the major vehicle for material failure, tend to acce...»
    Cracks, the major vehicle for material failure, tend to accelerate to high velocities in brittle materials. In three-dimensions, cracks generically undergo a micro-branching instability at about 40% of their sonic limiting velocity. Recent experiments showed that in sufficiently thin systems cracks unprecedentedly accelerate to nearly their limiting velocity without micro-branching, until they undergo an oscillatory instability. Despite their fundamental importance and apparent similarities to other instabilities in condensed-mater physics and materials science, these dynamic fracture instabilities remain poorly understood. They are not described by the classical theory of cracks, which assumes that linear elasticity is valid inside a stressed material and invokes an extraneous local symmetry criterion to predict crack paths. Here we develop a theory of two-dimensional dynamic brittle fracture capable of predicting arbitrary paths of ultra-high-speed cracks in the presence of elastic nonlinearity without extraneous criteria. We show that cracks undergo a dynamic oscillatory instability controlled by small-scale elastic nonlinearity near the crack tp. This instability occurs above an ultra-high critical velocity and features an intrinsic wavelength that increases proportionally to the ratio of the fracture energy to an elastic modulus, in quantitative agreement with experiments. This ratio emerges as a fundamental scaling length assumed to play no role in the classical theory of cracks, but shown here to strongly influence crack dynamics. The degree of universality of the instability is also demonstrated. Those results pave the way for resolving other long-standing puzzles in the failure of materials.
    Lecture
  • Date:06WednesdayDecember 2017

    A Tale of Two Evils: Aging and Cancer

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Professor Curtis C. Harris, MD
    National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, and Chief of the Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Cell Biology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:07ThursdayDecember 2017

    (Re)Constructing the Vertebrate Neural Tube

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    Time
    10:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. James Briscoe
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of The Francis Crick Institute...»
    The Francis Crick Institute
    Lecture
  • Date:07ThursdayDecember 2017

    Chemical and Biological Physics Dept Special Seminar

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    Time
    11:00
    Title
    Ultrafast and Very Small: Discovering Magnetism on the Nanoscale with X-rays
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Prof. Hendrik Ohldag
    SLAC, Stanford University
    Organizer
    Department of Chemical and Biological Physics
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:07ThursdayDecember 2017

    Physics Colloquium

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:30
    Location
    Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Grisha Falkovich
    WIS
    Organizer
    Faculty of Physics
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of 11:00 Coffee, Tea and more ...»
    11:00 Coffee, Tea and more
    AbstractShow full text abstract about TBA ...»
    TBA
    Colloquia
  • Date:07ThursdayDecember 2017

    Life Sciences Faculties' Council

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    Time
    15:00 - 18:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Contact
    Academic Events
  • Date:10SundayDecember 2017

    2017 Israel Computer Vision Day

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    Location
    Michael and Anna Wix Auditorium
    Organizer
    Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Homepage
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:10SundayDecember 2017

    Immunology Symposium in Honor of Prof Michael Sela 2017

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    Time
    09:00 - 12:30
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Chairperson
    Steffen Jung
    Homepage
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:11MondayDecember 2017

    Annual Pearlman lecture

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:15
    Title
    "Activity-Based Sensing to Decipher Transition Metal Signaling in the Brain and Beyond"
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Prof. Christopher (Chris) Chang
    Department of Chemistry, UC Berkeley
    Organizer
    Faculty of Chemistry
    Contact
    Colloquia
  • Date:11MondayDecember 2017

    Life Sciences Faculties' Council

    More information
    Time
    15:00 - 18:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Contact
    Academic Events

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