Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics

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Events

Seminar

January 29, 2018
Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
Ultimate Dark Matter detector
Andrzej K. Drukier
OKC, University of Stockholm

Event Information

Title:
Ultimate Dark Matter detector
Details:
OKC, University of Stockholm
Lecturer:
Andrzej K. Drukier
Date:
January 29, 2018
Time:
10:00:00 - 00:00:00
Location:
Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences Drory Auditorium
Abstract:
We disclose an implementation of RT-bolometers which comprise high chemical-energy materials, e.g. explosive or catalase, H2O2}-system, that can be operated at temperature between 4oC and room temperature (RT). Energy deposited by the incident weakly interacting particle to the nuclei can trigger a local release of chemical energy;. The energy release in such a `nano-explosion’ indicates that a coherent scattering event has taken place and allows for the localization of this event; For DM detection {catalase, H2O2}-system is preferred, and there are many catalases, which have maximum activity at temperatures from about 10oC to about 90oC. This permits to optimize enzymatic reactions and influences the read-out design. {catalase, H2O2}-system works because the range of recoiling nuclei is so short that most of the energy is transferred in a single “voxel” called “vertex”, leading to a large local temperature increase. When neutrino or WIMPs scatter on nuclei, the majority of the recoil nucleus energy is transferred to the lattice, which leads to the creation of ballistic phonons which rapidly thermalize, i.e. increase the temperature in vertex. For 5 GeV/c2 < MDM < 15 GeV/c2 the energy of the recoiling nuclei is 0.5-2.0 keV and all this energy is deposited within a few nm. Thus, the dE/dx = O(0.1 keV/nm) is deposited in the vertex. The energy deposition is much smaller in the case of single charged, relativistic particles and corresponds to dE/dx < 1 eV/nm for single charged particles. These permits background rejection. We developed a very efficient read-out for such detectors. The expected detector cost is low, ca. $50,000 per ton. The deployment will be deep underwater, say at Marina Trench at depth of 11 km. Optionally, such a detector can be used as a “spaghetti detector” and placed in very deep bore-holes down to 20 km water equivalent. Similar detectors can be used for Emission Geo-Neutrino Tomography aka Neutrino Geology.

Seminar

February 05, 2018
Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
The shaping of interwar physics by technology: the case of piezoelectricity
Shaul Katzir
The Cohn institute for history and philosophy of science, Tel Aviv University

Event Information

Title:
The shaping of interwar physics by technology: the case of piezoelectricity
Details:
The Cohn institute for history and philosophy of science, Tel Aviv University11:00 Refreshments
Lecturer:
Shaul Katzir
Date:
February 05, 2018
Time:
11:15:00 - 12:30:00
Location:
Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences Auditorium
Abstract:
Concentrating on the important developments of quantum physics, associated with atomic and nuclear research, historians have overlooked other significant forces that shaped interwar physics, like that of technology. Based on the case of piezoelectricity, I will argue that interests of users of technics (i.e. devices of methods) channelled research in physics into particular fields and questions that they deemed relevant for improving instruments and techniques important for industrial firms and governmental agencies. I will further expose a range of reasons that led researchers to studies pertinent to technics and public and industrial institutes that facilitated this move. The similarities between the interwar period and our contemporary world would allow the audience to draw parallels to the present.