National Cancer Institute search for Chief of Structural Biology

The U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) is currently recruiting a Chief of Structural Biology in the NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR). This is a new position that reflects NCI’s commitment and support for structural biology and molecular biophysics. The incoming Chief will be the intellectual and administrative leader of the NCI intramural structural biology/biophysics research program and the NCI structural biology/biophysics community. Located on the NCI campus in Frederick, Maryland, the Chief of Structural Biology will oversee a department of about 10 research groups, comprising approximately 100 scientists and trainees, currently housed in the Structural Biophysics Laboratory and the Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory. In this new role, the Chief will have the opportunity to determine the direction of the NCI structural biology/biophysics research program through several new hires over the next few years.

The Chief’s research program will be fully supported by generous, stable funding from the NCI intramural research program, providing unmatched intellectual freedom and encouraging innovative, creative research. The Chief will also have access to extensive structural biology/biophysics infrastructure in the NCI intramural program including a state-of-the-art cryo-EM facility, NMR, X-ray, XFEL, SAXS and computational resources. In addition, the position offers unmatched opportunities for interaction and collaboration with a large number of world-class biomedical and clinical researchers in the intramural research program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Candidates should have a strong track record in any field of structural biology or molecular biophysics, as well as a vision for the development of a multi-laboratory research program in structural biology/biophysics.
Administrative experience is desirable.

Further information and application instructions can be found at
https://irp-positions.nih.gov/apply/index.cgi?pid=2c58652186abe9c3 .
Please contact Robert Tycko at robertty@mail.nih.gov with any questions.