Webinars

Quicktabs - Webinars

    Past webinars for All years

  • M2C2 2021 webinar: #7 The Armbrust lab

    Date: Wednesday, September 1, 2021
    Hour: 9:00 - 11:00 EST 15:00 - 17:00 CET 16:00 - 18:00 IL

    Speakers

    Biotic and Abiotic Influences on the Behavior of Marine Phytoplankton

    Ginger Armbrust, PI

    University of Washington, USA

    Light Sensing in Open Ocean Eukaryotic Plankton

    Sacha Coesel, Research scientist

    University of Washington, USA

    A Tale of Two Flavodoxins

    Shiri Graff van Creveld, Postdoctoral scholar

    University of Washington, USA

    A Flavobacterium Releases Extracellular Products that Impact Cell Cycle Regulation and Metabolism in a Model Diatom

    Zinka Bartolek, PhD student

    University of Washington, USA

  • M2C2 2021 webinar: #6 The Kujawinski lab

    Date: Wednesday, July 7, 2021
    Hour: 9:00 - 11:00 EST 15:00 - 17:00 CET 16:00 - 18:00 IL
    About the lab

    Microorganisms drive the marine carbon cycle by controlling the rates of carbon fixation and remineralization in ocean environments. Embedded within the bulk rates of this cycle are metabolic reactions catalyzed by enzymes expressed by microbes in response to changing nutrient concentrations, light levels and temperature. Metabolite dynamics, thus, integrate a microbe’s response to external parameters and metabolite concentrations and/or fluxes can be used to infer relative importance of different biogeochemical processes within the carbon cycle. While particulate metabolites provide a snapshot of biochemical reactions within microbial cells, dissolved metabolites are the external footprint of microbial physiology and are the currencies for microbe-microbe interactions in ocean environments. The Kujawinski lab develops metabolomics methods to answer key questions within microbial oceanography, with an emphasis on extracting and quantifying labile dissolved metabolites. In our M2C2 seminar, we will provide an overview of the lab’s activities and emerging methods, and three group presentations on (i) a four-year time-series of dissolved metabolites in the north Atlantic Ocean, (ii) physiological shifts in eukaryotic phytoplankton under nutrient stress and (iii) metabolite assimilation capabilities of the heterotroph, Alteromonas macleodii.

    Speakers

    About the lab

    Elizabeth Kujawinski, PI

    Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, USA

    Seasonal and diel dynamics of an untargeted exometabolome at an oligotrophic time series

    Erin McParland, Postdoctoral scholar

    Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, USA

    Pathway responses to nutrient stress distinguishes phytoplankton groups

    Craig McLean, PhD student

    Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, USA

    Exploring selective metabolite usage by Alteromonas macleodii, a surprisingly picky eater

    Kathryn Halloran, PhD student

    Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, USA

  • M2C2 2021 webinar: #5 The IAMM project – Sher, Grossart, Segré, Voss labs

    Date: Wednesday, June 2, 2021
    Hour: 9:00 - 11:00 EST 15:00 - 17:00 CET 16:00 - 18:00 IL
    Organizer lab The IAMM project – Sher, Grossart, Segré, Voss labs

    Haifa Uni/IGB/BU/IOW

    About the lab

    Marine biogeochemistry, energy and greenhouse gas fluxes from the ocean are primarily controlled by microbes. Looking at marine communities in a holistic way, the IAMM team (Interactions Among Marine Microbes) aims to predict how marine microorganisms growing together interact and affect each other, based on the information encoded in their genomes. Our work is motivated by increasing evidence that interactions between marine microorganisms are key to understanding global biogeochemical cycles, weather and climate. Understanding the fate of these interactions is nevertheless extremely complicated due to the enormous diversity of microorganisms and the richness of their metabolism. We are working to tackle this challenge through a tightly integrated combination of genome analyses, genome-scale modeling, and laboratory experiments, to identify genomic traits dictating how environmentally-relevant microbes interact. In the M2C2 presentations, we will ask three questions: 1) How are traits related to microbial interactions partitioned across marine microbial diversity? 2) To what extent does the growth of marine microbes under lab conditions recapitulate their metabolic potential? 3) To what extent does the phenotype of microbial interactions vary between ecologically-divergent strains of two model marine microbes (Prochlorococcus and Alteromonas)?

    Speakers

    Overview of the IAMM project

    Daniel Sher, PI

    University of Haifa, Israel

    Comparative whole-genome approach to identify bacterial traits for microbial interactions

    Luca Zoccarato, Postdoc

    IGB, Berlin, Germany

    Marine microbial interactions across diversity and their biogeochemical consequences

    Hans-Peter G, PI

    IGB, Berlin, Germany

    Metabolic phenotyping of marine heterotrophs on refactored media reveals diverse metabolic adaptations and lifestyle strategies

    Elena Forchielli, PhD student

    Boston University, USA

    Predicting ecosystem-level metabolism and microbial interactions

    Daniel Segré, PI

    Boston University, USA

    Phototroph-heterotroph interactions during growth and long-term starvation across Prochlorococcus and Alteromonas diversity

    Osnat Weissberg, PhD student

    University of Haifa, Israel

    *Currently at sea*

    Maren Voss, PI

    IO Warnemunde, Germany

  • M2C2 2021 webinar: #4 The Selander lab

    Date: Wednesday, May 5, 2021
    Hour: 9:00 - 11:00 EST 15:00 - 17:00 CET 16:00 - 18:00 IL
    About the lab

    The Signals in the Sea research group work on chemically mediated interactions in the marine pelagic. We are particularly interested of the role of copepods in the marine food web. Copepods exude a unique bouquet of polar lipids, copepodamides, that induce defensive traits in a wide variety of prey organisms. This includes phycotoxin production, bioluminescence increase, altered swimming behavior and diel feeding rhythms. Copepodamides provide a useful tool to gain mechanistic understanding for chemical communication in plankton. We will present some recent results where we use copepodamides to evaluate defensive traits and tradeoffs, molecular mechanisms, and ecological effects of grazer cues. Finally, we develop new tools based on holographic microscopy and deep learning algorithms to explore the whereabouts of the most important but least known grazers in the sea, the microzooplankton.

    Speakers

    Group overview

    Erik Selander, PI

    University of Gothenburg, Sweden

    Predator-induced defense in a dinoflagellate: yet another paradox of the plankton?

    Fredrik Ryderheim, PhD student

    Technical University of Denmark

    Eavesdropping on plankton - can zooplankton monitoring improve biotoxin forecasting?

    Aubrey Trapp, PhD student

    University of California, Santa Cruz

    Microzooplankton classification and their feeding patterns by digital holographic microscopy and deep learning

    Harshith Bachimanchi, PhD student

    University of Gothenburg, Sweden

    Breaking out of chains -grazer induced defenses in diatoms

    Kristie Rigby, PhD student

    University of Gothenburg, Sweden

  • M2C2 2021 webinar: #3 The Kubanek lab

    Date: Wednesday, April 7, 2021
    Hour: 9:00 - 11:00 EST 15:00 - 17:00 CET 16:00 - 18:00 IL
    About the lab

    All organisms use chemicals to assess their environment and to communicate with others. Chemical cues for defense, mating, habitat selection, and food tracking are crucial, widespread, and structurally and functionally diverse. Yet our knowledge of chemical signaling is patchy, especially in marine environments. In our research we ask, “How do marine organisms use chemicals to solve critical problems of competition, disease, predation, and reproduction?” Our group uses an integrated approach to understand how chemical cues function in ecological interactions, working from molecular to community levels. We also use ecological insights to guide discovery of novel pharmaceuticals and molecular probes

    Speakers

    Kubanek group overview

    Julia Kubanek, PI

    Georgia Tech, USA

    Predator cues target signaling pathways in toxic algal metabolome

    Emily Brown, PhD student

    Georgia Tech, USA

    Cryptic chemical variation in marine algae as revealed by untargeted metabolomics

    Bhuwan Chhetri, PhD student

    Georgia Tech, USA

    Marine bacteria derived pesticides to protect microalgal biofuel crops

    Marisa Cepeda, PhD student

    Georgia Tech, USA

  • M2C2 2021 webinar: #2 The Pohnert lab

    Date: Wednesday, March 3, 2021
    Hour: 9:00 - 11:00 EST 15:00 - 17:00 CET 16:00 - 18:00 IL
    About the lab

    The Pohnert group elucidates new chemical defence- and communication strategies of marine algae using the tools of modern bioorganic chemistry. We seek to understand the chemical language spoken between organisms. In the aquatic environment we focus on the language of algae that release molecules into the water in order to communicate with each other, to interact with microorganisms or to defend themselves. Our work aims to understand the role of chemical compounds as mediators of ecological interactions of entire communities. Isolation, spectroscopy and organic synthesis of natural products are important aspects of our work, but we believe that the full picture of the role of the compounds can only be obtained if biochemistry and ecology are brought in as well. We also develop new methods based on metabolomics techniques (i.e. the monitoring of all metabolites released by a given organisms) to understand chemically mediated processes in communities. Our interdisciplinary work gives new insights into the chemically mediated species interactions and the function of natural products.

    Speakers

    The metabolic marketplace in the sea

    Georg Pohnert, PI

    Friedrich-Schiller Universität Jena, Germany

    Phytoplankton community interactions: from population to single-cell studies

    Marine Vallet, Postdoctoral researcher

    Friedrich-Schiller Universität Jena, Germany

    Bacteria-macroalgae interaction: Role of dimethylsulfoniopropionate and thallusin in bacterial attraction and morphogenesis of Ulva (Chlorophyta)

    Thomas Wichard, Research group leader

    Friedrich-Schiller Universität Jena, Germany

  • M2C2 2021 webinar: #1 The Vardi lab on chemical signalling during host-pathogen interactions at sea

    Date: Wednesday, February 3, 2021
    Hour: 9:00 - 11:00 EST 15:00 - 17:00 CET 16:00 - 18:00 IL
    About the lab

    Marine photosynthetic microorganisms (phytoplankton) are the basis of marine food webs. Despite the fact that their biomass represents only about 0.2% of the photosynthetic biomass on earth, they are responsible for nearly 50% of the global annual photosynthesis, and greatly influence global biogeochemical cycles. They can form massive oceanic blooms that stretch over thousands of kilometres and can be detected by satellites. They are regulated by environmental factors such as abiotic stress (nutrient availability, light regime) and biotic interactions with grazers and viruses.

    Despite the huge importance of marine algae, relatively little is known about the molecular basis for their ecological success. We are interested in understanding the cellular mechanisms that govern the response of phytoplankton to microbial interactions with pathogens (viruses, bacteria) and grazers that control the fate of these blooms from the micro to the macro scales.

    Our work aims at elucidating the cell signalling pathways that regulate cell fate decisions and uncover the chemical signals (infochemicals) involved in the complex microbial interactions in the oceans.

    Speakers

    Vardi lab overview

    Assaf Vardi, PI

    Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel

    Host-virus interactions through the metabolomics lens

    Constanze Kuhlisch, Postdoctoral researcher

    Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel

    Behavioral switch in bacteria in response to algal metabolites

    Noa Barak-Gavish, Postdoctoral researcher

    Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel

    The role of dimethyl sulfide as an eat-me signal during microbial predator-prey interactions

    Adva Shemi, Postdoctoral researcher

    Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel