Lectures and Events - Faculty of Chemistry

Upcoming Lectures

  • December05

    11:00 AM

    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall

    Atomic Resolution Structures of Amyloid Fibrils - Ab1-42 , Ab1-40 and b2-microglobulin

    Prof. Robert Guy Griffin

    Many peptides and proteins form amyloid fibrils whose detailed molecular structure is of considerable functional and...

    Many peptides and proteins form amyloid fibrils whose detailed molecular structure is of considerable functional and pathological importance. For example, amyloid is closely associated with the neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. We review the macroscopic properties of fibrils and outline approaches to determining their microscopic structure using magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR with 2D and 3D dipole recoupling experiments involving spectral assignments and distance measurements. Key to obtaining high resolution is measurement of a sufficient number of NMR structural restraints (13C-13C and 13C-15N distances per residue). In addition, we demonstrate the applicability of 1H detection and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to amyloid structural studies. We discuss the structures of three different amyloids: (1) fibrils formed by Ab1-42, the toxic species in Alzheimer’s, using >500 distance constraints; (2) fibrils of Ab1-40, a second form of Ab with a different structure, and (3) a structure of fibrils forned by b2-microglobulin, the 99 amino acid protein associated with dialysis related amylosis, using ~1200 constraints. Contrary to conventional wisdom, the spectral data indicate that the molecules in the fibril are microscopically well ordered. In addition, the structures provide insight into the mechanism of interaction of the monoclonal antibody, Aducanumab, directed against Ab amyloid.

  • December12

    11:00 AM

    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall

    Mapping protein conformations using EPR/DEER spectroscopy

    Prof. Stefan Stoll

    For many proteins, flexibility and motion form the basis of their function. In our lab, we quantify the conformational...

    For many proteins, flexibility and motion form the basis of their function. In our lab, we quantify the conformational landscapes of proteins and their changes upon interaction with external effectors. Using Double Electron-Electron Resonance (DEER) spectroscopy, a form of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, we directly measure absolute distances and distance distributions between pairs of spin labels within proteins. From the data, we build quantitative structural and energetic models of the protein's intrinsic flexibility, conformational substates, and the structural changes induced by ligands and binding partners. In this talk, I present some of our recent results on the allosteric regulation of ion channels, the function of de novo designed protein switches, and novel methods for measuring protein conformations directly in their native cellular environment.

  • December26

    11:00 AM

    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall

    One hundred years of electrified interfaces: What’s new with the theories of Debye and Onsager?

    Prof. David Andelman

    The Poisson-Boltzmann theory stems from the pioneering works of Debye and Onsager and is considered even today as the...

    The Poisson-Boltzmann theory stems from the pioneering works of Debye and Onsager and is considered even today as the benchmark of ionic solutions and electrified interfaces. It has been instrumental during the last century in predicting charge distributions and interactions between charged surfaces, membranes, electrodes as well as macromolecules and colloids. The electrostatic model of charged fluids, on which the Poisson-Boltzmann description rests and its statistical mechanical consequences have been scrutinized in great detail. Much less, however, is understood about its probable shortcomings when dealing with various aspects of real physical, chemical, and biological systems. After reviewing the Poisson-Boltzmann theory, I will discuss several extensions and modifications to the seminal works of Debye and Onsager as applied to ions and macromolecules in confined geometries. These novel ideas include the effect of dipolar solvent molecules, finite size of ions, ionic specificity, surface tension, and conductivity of concentrated ionic solutions.

  • January16

    11:00 AM

    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall

    Harnessing Coulombic Forces to Guide Colloidal Self-Assembly

    Prof. Stefano Sacanna

    From snowflakes to nanoparticle superlattices, a menagerie of complex structures emerge from simple building blocks...

    From snowflakes to nanoparticle superlattices, a menagerie of complex structures emerge from simple building blocks attracting each other with Coulombic forces. On the colloidal scale, however, this self-assembly feat is not easily accomplished. Although many colloids bear an innate surface charge, their strong electrostatic attraction is not directly suitable for crystallization. Instead, particles must be finely crafted to serve as self-assembling units. In this talk, I'll show the robust assembly of crystalline materials from common suspensions of oppositely charged colloids through a generic approach which we refer to as polymerattenuated Coulombic self-assembly. I will demonstrate that, when particles are held separated at specific distances by a neutral polymer spacer, the attractive overlap between oppositely charged electrical double layers can be systematically tuned, directing particles to disperse, crystallize, or become permanently fixed on demand.

  • January30

    11:00 AM

    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall

    Title tbd

    Prof. Tahei Tahara

  • February13

    11:00 AM

    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall

    TBD

    Prof. Jacob Sagiv

  • February27

    11:00 AM

    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall

    title tbd

    Prof. Herbert Waldmann

  • March20

    11:00 AM

    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall

    Title tbd

    Prof. Erez Braun

  • April10

    11:00 AM

    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall

    title tbd

    Prof. Alex Zunger

  • April24

    11:00 AM

    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall

    title tbd

    Prof. Thomas R. Ward

  • May08

    11:00 AM

    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall

    Title tbd

    Prof. Hideki Kandori

  • May22

    11:00 AM

    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall

    TBD

    Prof. Eberhard K. U. Gross

  • May29

    11:00 AM

    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall

    2023 G.M.J. SCHMIDT MEMORIAL LECTURE

    Prof. Erwin Reisner

  • June12

    11:00 AM

    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall

    title tbd

    Prof. Robin Grimes

  • November06

    11:00 AM

    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall

    Title tbd

    Prof. Danna Friedman

  • June03

    11:00 AM

    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall

    title tbd

    Prof. Lewis E. Kay