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Upcoming Seminars

MondayMay 27, 201914:30
Foundations of Computer Science SeminarRoom 155
Speaker:Rotem Oshman Title:Distributed Property Testing -- Progress and ChallengesAbstract:opens in new windowin html    pdfopens in new window

In this talk I will describe some recent work on distributed property testing in the networks with bounded bandwidth (the CONGEST model): we have a network of computing nodes communicating over some initially-unknown network graph, where every communication link can carry a bounded number of bits per round. Some simple-looking problems, such as checking if the network contains a 4-cycle, are known to be very hard in this model, and this motivates us to consider property testing instead of exact solutions.

I will describe distributed property testing algorithms for two problems: subgraph-freeness, where we wish to determine whether the network graph contains some fixed constant-sized subgraph H; and uniformity testing, where every node of the network draws samples from an unknown distribution, and our goal is to determine whether the distribution is uniform or far from uniform. I will also discuss lower bounds.

TuesdayMay 28, 201911:15
Algebraic Geometry and Representation Theory SeminarRoom 155
Speaker:Maria GorelikTitle:Virasoro Lie algebra and its relatives in the super-worldAbstract:opens in new windowin html    pdfopens in new window

This will be a very introductory talk about Virasoro Lie algebra and its super-analogues: Ramond and Neveu-Schwarz Lie superalgebras.

ThursdayMay 30, 201912:15
Vision and Robotics SeminarRoom 1
Speaker:Yael Moses Title:On the Role of Geometry in Geo-LocalizationAbstract:opens in new windowin html    pdfopens in new window

We consider the geo-localization task - finding the pose (position & orientation) of a camera in a large 3D scene from a single image. We aim toexperimentally explore the role of geometry in geo-localization in a convolutional neural network (CNN) solution. We do so by ignoring the often available texture of the scene. We therefore deliberately avoid using texture or rich geometric details and use images projected from a simple 3D model of a city, which we term lean images. Lean images contain solely information that relates to the geometry of the area viewed (edges, faces, or relative depth). We find that the network is capable of estimating the camera pose from the lean images, and it does so not by memorization but by some measure of geometric learning of the geographical area. The main contributions of this work are: (i) providing insight into the role of geometry in the CNN learning process; and (ii) demonstrating the power of CNNs for recovering camera pose using lean images.
 
This is a joint work with Moti Kadosh  & Ariel Shamir
 

MondayJun 03, 201914:30
Foundations of Computer Science SeminarRoom 1
Speaker:Ido Shahaf Title:Tight Tradeoffs in Searchable Symmetric EncryptionAbstract:opens in new windowin html    pdfopens in new window

A searchable symmetric encryption (SSE) scheme enables a client to store data on an untrusted server while supporting keyword searches in a secure manner. Recent experiments have indicated that the practical relevance of such schemes heavily relies on the tradeoff between their space overhead, locality (the number of non-contiguous memory locations that the server accesses with each query), and read efficiency (the ratio between the number of bits the server reads with each query and the actual size of the answer). In this talk, we survey recent constructions and matching lower bounds, and discuss their underlying techniques.

Based on joint works with Gilad Asharov, Moni Naor, and Gil Segev.

ThursdayJun 06, 201912:15
Vision and Robotics SeminarRoom 1
Speaker:Yosef Gandelsman Title:TBAAbstract:opens in new windowin html    pdfopens in new window
ThursdayJun 13, 201912:15
Vision and Robotics SeminarRoom 1
Speaker:Eitan Richardson Title:TBAAbstract:opens in new windowin html    pdfopens in new window
TuesdayJun 18, 201911:15
Algebraic Geometry and Representation Theory SeminarRoom 155
Speaker:Michał Zydor Title:Periods of automorphic forms over reductive groups Abstract:opens in new windowin html    pdfopens in new window

Periods of automorphic forms have an important place in the theory of automorphic representations. They are often related to (special values of) L-functions and have applications to arithmetic geometry and analytic number theory. For an automorphic form on a group G, a period is its integral over a subgroup of G. If the automorphic form is not cuspidal such integrals are usually divergent. It is nonetheless possible in many cases to extend the definition of the period to almost all automorphic forms which has direct applications to the study of the given period. In this talk I will describe a general procedure of defining such periods in the case when the subgroup is reductive.
I will also discuss the joint work with A. Pollack and C. Wan that applies this to the study of certain periods and their relations to special values of L-functions confirming predictions of Sakellaridis and Venkatesh.

ThursdayJun 27, 201912:15
Vision and Robotics SeminarRoom 1
Speaker:Ehud Barnea Title:TBAAbstract:opens in new windowin html    pdfopens in new window
ThursdayJul 04, 201912:15
Vision and Robotics SeminarRoom 1
Speaker:Nadav Dym Title:TBAAbstract:opens in new windowin html    pdfopens in new window
ThursdayJul 11, 201912:15
Vision and Robotics SeminarRoom 1
Speaker:Anat Levin Title:TBAAbstract:opens in new windowin html    pdfopens in new window