You are here

People

Dr Elisabetta Boaretto
Scientific Archaeology Unit, D-REAMS Radiocarbon Laboratory, Weizmann Institute – Max Planck Center for Integrative Archaeology and Anthropology
Research Interests: Chronologies in archaeological research based on radiocarbon dating. Archaeological context characterization for radiocarbon dating using microarchaeology methods. Archaeological material characterization.
Eugenia Mintz
Scientific Archaeology Unit, D-REAMS Radiocarbon Laboratory, Weizmann Institute of Science
Research Interests: Development and application of methods for radiocarbon dating by AMS. Sample preparation and preservation of different materials for radiocarbon dating.
Dr Lior Regev
Scientific Archaeology Unit, D-REAMS Radiocarbon Laboratory, Weizmann Institute – Max Planck Center for Integrative Archaeology and Anthropology
Research Interests: AMS radiocarbon dating - research, operation and maintenance. Deducing past climate from fresh and charred wood samples, dendrochronology and stable isotopes. Previously my interests were radiocarbon dating of lime plaster and wood ash, and infrared analysis of various geogenic and anthropogenic calcites.
Dr Omry Barzilai
Prehistory Branch, Israel Antiquities Authority; Weizmann Institute – Max Planck Center for Integrative Archaeology and Anthropology
Research Interests: Prehistoric Archaeology, Chipped Stone Technologies, Radiocarbon Dating, Dispersal of AMH into Eurasia, Origins of agriculture.
Dr Johanna Regev
Scientific Archaeology Unit, D-REAMS Radiocarbon Laboratory
Research Interests: Radiocarbon oriented excavation methods, microarchaeology, radiocarbon dating of Early Bronze age chronology, transition dating of cultural changes, Bayesian analysis.
Dr Daniele Castagneri, visiting scientist
Department TESAF, University of Padua, Italy
Research Interests: Forest ecology and dendrochronology. My research aims at understanding environmental influences on tree growth. In the last years, I am focusing on climate effects on xylem anatomical traits on both conifers and broadleaves in different environmental settings, from the Alps to the Mediterranean.
Dr Roman Schuetz
Scientific Archaeology Unit, D-REAMS Radiocarbon Laboratory
The main scope of my research is focused on the approach development of Raman Spectroscopy for archaeological charcoal and humic substances characterisation. Charcoal is one of the most important materials used for radiocarbon dating in archaeology and it is composed of the charred organic material itself and its diagenetic decomposition products. The understanding of the diagenesis of charcoal and its discrimination from the absorbed environmental humic substances can contain archaeological, environmental and soil science information. In my previous work I used polarized Raman Spectroscopy and other analytical methods for a comprehensive analysis of the Temple Scroll (DSS collection). In this context I characterized the mechanical and structural properties of collagen with respect to the environmental humidity and temperature conditions.
Dr Andre Zular
Scientific Archaeology Unit, D-REAMS Radiocarbon Laboratory
Dating pottery and depositional times of sediments, firing temperatures of flint tools from archaeological sites using OSL (optically stimulated luminescence) and TL (thermoluminescence), provenance studies using methods as TL sensitivity and heavy minerals, and paleoenvironmental reconstruction using sedimentological and geochemical proxies.
PhD Student Yael Ehrlich
Scientific Archaeology Unit, D-REAMS Radiocarbon Laboratory, Weizmann Institute – Max Planck Center for Integrative Archaeology and Anthropology
My research is focused on olives from archaeological sites: charred olive pits, which I am planning to use for climate reconstruction, and olive wood, which I aim to determine whether or not may be used for dendrochronology. For both, in order to understand the significance of the data from archaeological material, I must first understand how modern olive trees behave under different environmental conditions, and how this may be reflected in the pits and wood.
PhD Student Ron Lev
Scientific Archaeology Unit, D-REAMS Radiocarbon Laboratory
My current research is to clarify the absolute chronology of the Intermediate Bronze age based on radiocarbon dating, and to identify possible typological stages within that period. Other research interests: The bronze age in the southern Levant and Egyptian influence on it. Digital methods for archaeological data capturing (including in the field).
PhD Student Yan Xin
Scientific Archaeology Unit, D-REAMS Radiocarbon Laboratory
Absolute radiocarbon chronologies for a group of Byzantine sites in the Negev. Collecting datable materials from reliable contexts and characterizing them carefully for preservation characterization.
MSc student Zane Stepka
Scientific Archaeology Unit, D-REAMS Radiocarbon Laboratory
For my masters research, I am developing a method for detecting increased concentrations of tiny flint fragments in sediments from prehistoric excavations. When people in the Stone Age were making tools by knapping flint, a lot of flint dust flew around. If I find this dust today in the sediments, it is very likely that I have found the particular location where people used to work in the past. I want to apply this method for amber, too, which could be applied for sites in the Baltic.

Dangoor Education - the Exilarch Foundation opens in a new windowThe DANGOOR Research Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (D-REAMS) Laboratory was established by the Exilarch Foundation in November 2012. www.dangooreducation.com