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Lectures & Events

Tuesday 22 October
Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building 11:00
Sensing and Recognition using Molecules and Nanomaterials: From toxic elements to Biomarkers Prof. Carlos Lodeiro [Info]

Sensing and Recognition using Molecules and Nanomaterials: From toxic elements to Biomarkers

We, humans and animals, feel the outside world thanks to our 5 senses. We hear, we see, we smell, we touch, and we taste. The success of our lives often depends on how sharp our senses are. In a scientific environment, sensing and feeling is also important. In chemistry, in biology, in medicine, in forensics, as in other areas, feeling, recognising, is crucial. In the present seminar, I will show some examples of the use of chromophores such as porphyrins, emissive peptides, rhodamines, liquid crystals-based metal complexes, fluorescein and others, free or supported in polymers, paper, and gold, silver, platinum nanoparticles, or messoporous structured nanomaterials for hunting and capture of molecules, ions and biomarkers for Proteomics Applications. FCT University NOVA of Lisbon – PORTUGAL
Tuesday 22 October
Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building 11:30
Towards Mass Spectrometry-Based Quantitative Clinical Proteomics Prof. Jose Luis Capelo Martinez [Info]

Towards Mass Spectrometry-Based Quantitative Clinical Proteomics

The use of proteomics in the clinical arena has been traditionally hampered by low sample throughput and by difficulties in quantifying proteins in complex proteomes in an absolute manner. The use of ultrasonic energy to speed complex proteomics workflows for protein quantification along with thea advent of High Resolution Mass Spectrometry have made possible to treat and to analyze tens of samples a day, thus making mass spectrometry-based clinical proteomics a modern practical tool to be explored. FCT University NOVA of Lisbon – PORTUGAL
Monday 28 October
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall 11:00
Molecular Electron Microscopy for Studies on Mechanism of Molecular Motions and Reactions Prof. Eiichi Nakamura [Info]

Molecular Electron Microscopy for Studies on Mechanism of Molecular Motions and Reactions

University of Tokyo
Monday 18 November
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall 11:00
Chemistry colloquium Prof. Dan Yakir [Info]

Chemistry colloquium

Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, WIS
Monday 25 November
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall 11:00
Chemistry colloquium Dr. Ron Diskin [Info]

Chemistry colloquium

Dept. of Structural Biology, WIS
Tuesday 03 December
Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium 03:00
The Braginsky Center for the Interface between the Sciences and the Humanities Prof. Yadin Dudai [Info]

The Braginsky Center for the Interface between the Sciences and the Humanities

From the vantage point of the Science of Memory, human cultures can be considered as 'biocultural supraorganisms' that can store distributed experience-dependent, behaviorally-relevant representations over hundreds and thousands of years. I will describe cognitive and artefactual instruments that mediate encoding, consolidation, storage and retrieval of such cross-generational collective engrams in large human populations. Investigation of this type of long-duration memory is made possible by combining archeology, history and cognitive science. I will focus on a model system for the analysis of long-duration cultural memory. This is the memory of the Jewish culture, that can be traced back ca. 3300 yr (i.e. ca. 130 generations) ago. I will zoom in on the core memory of this culture, i.e., the minimal set of cross-generational mnemonic items considered by members of that culture to define their collective origin, history and distinctiveness. Identifying a core memory item and tracing its fate over time can facilitate mechanistic understanding of remote as well as more recent collective memory. I will present data and hypotheses concerning the encoding, transformation, persistence and reactivation of an early component of the core memory, that had amalgamated fact with fiction in its first ca. 1000 yrs before being put in writing ca. 2300 yrs ago in an information-dense text of only 63 Hebrew words. Its high-fidelity persistence relied on evolving procedural reactivations. Potential implications of this persistence mechanism for understanding remote memory in individuals will be discussed. In recent generations reactivation of this memory and its updating play a role in splitting Jewish cultural memory into sub-narratives that differ, inter alia, in geographical distribution and cultural signature. This enables data-based analysis of ongoing transformation of collective memory in a large distributed human population Department of Neurobiology, WIS
Monday 09 December
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall 11:00
Chemistry colloquium Dr. Emmanuel Levy [Info]

Chemistry colloquium

Dept. of Structural Biology, WIS
Monday 16 December
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall 11:00
Solution-Processed Organic Semiconductors for Applications in Opto-electronic Devices Prof. Thuc-Quyen Nguyen [Info]

Solution-Processed Organic Semiconductors for Applications in Opto-electronic Devices

University of California, Santa Barbara
Monday 13 January
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall 11:00
Chemistry colloquium Prof. Vicki Wysocki [Info]

Chemistry colloquium

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ohio State University
Monday 27 January
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall 11:00
Annual Pearlman lecture Prof. Bert M. Weckhuysen [Info]

Annual Pearlman lecture

University of Utrecht
Monday 17 February
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall 11:00
Chemistry colloquium Prof. Dieter Schlueter [Info]

Chemistry colloquium

ETH Zurich, Switzerland
Monday 16 March
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall 11:00
Chemistry colloquium Prof. Dean Astumian [Info]

Chemistry colloquium

University of Maine
Monday 27 April
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall 11:00
Chemistry colloquium Prof. Nuria Lopez [Info]

Chemistry colloquium

Institut Catalana d'Investigacio Quimica
Monday 11 May
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall 11:00
2020 G.M.J. SCHMIDT MEMORIAL LECTURE Prof. Thomas Ebbesen [Info]

2020 G.M.J. SCHMIDT MEMORIAL LECTURE

University of Strasbourg, France