Events

  • Date:
    02

    Wednesday

    December 2020

    Hour: 15:00 - 16:00,Location:
    Event name: The impact of non-canonical DNA structures on protein-DNA interactions

    Dr. Ariel Afek, Duke Center for Genomic and Computational Biology Duke University NC, USA

  • Date:
    23

    Monday

    November 2020

    Hour: 16:00,Location:
    Event name: Putting Proteins Together: Reconstitution of Mechanisms Driving Cilia Motility and Fertilization

    Dr. Iris Grossman-Haham, Dept. of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology University of California, San Francisco

  • Date:
    05

    Thursday

    March 2020

    Hour: 11:00 - 12:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Using Coot for Cryo-EM Model Building, Refinement and Validation

    Dr. Paul Emsley, Laboratory of Molecular Biology Cambridge, England

  • Date:
    03

    Tuesday

    March 2020

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Hierarchy in the innate immunity kingdom - Assembly mechanism of high order signaling machines

    Dr. Liron David, Harvard Medical School

  • Date:
    27

    Thursday

    February 2020

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location:
    Event name: IDPs are in fact intrinsically disordered phospho-proteins

    Dr. François-Xavier Theillet, CNRS, Paris-Saclay France

  • Date:
    03

    Monday

    February 2020

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Peptide-Coated Platinum Nanoparticles as Antitumor Agents

    Dr. Michal Shoshan, Group leader in Bioinorganic Chemistry Department of Chemistry, University of Zurich

  • Date:
    28

    Tuesday

    January 2020

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Toward HCV vaccine - Structural studies of HCV E2 envelop glycoprotein that facilitates rational design of HCV vaccine.

    Dr. Netanel Tzarum, HUJI

  • Date:
    21

    Tuesday

    January 2020

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Connecting the Dots: Multiple-substrate orchestration in bacterial type IV secretion systems

    Dr. Amit Meir, Yale University

  • Date:
    14

    Tuesday

    January 2020

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Characterization of calcium ion cellular pathways in sea urchin larvae

    Keren Kahil, Labs of Prof. Lia Addadi & Prof. Steve Weiner Dept. of Structural Biology, WIS

  • Date:
    31

    Tuesday

    December 2019

    Hour: 14:30 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Intricate Assembly Mechanism of Mucin Glycoproteins Revealed by Cryo-electron Microscopy of Polymers

    Gabriel Javitt, Prof. Deborah Fass lab Dept. of Structural Biology Weizmann Institute

  • Date:
    31

    Tuesday

    December 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 14:30,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Reversible-Covalent Proteolysis-Targeting Chimeras (PROTACs): opening the door for new targets

    Dr. Ronen Gabizon, Dr. Nir London lab Dept. of Organic Chemistry Weizmann Institute

  • Date:
    24

    Tuesday

    December 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Depsipeptides and RNA: from molecules to early interactome

    Dr. Moran Frenkel-Pinter, NASA Postdoctoral Fellow | Hud, Grover and Williams Labs NSF/NASA Center for Chemical Evolution Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Chemistry and Biochemistry 901 Atlantic Drive | Atlanta, GA 30332

  • Date:
    17

    Tuesday

    December 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Metal-binding as a new approach for peptoids folding and self assembly

    Dr. Galia Ma'ayan, Technion, Haifa

  • Date:
    10

    Tuesday

    December 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Tracking proteins' conformations inside cells with Gd(III) spin labels

    Prof. Daniella Goldfarb, Department of Chemical and Biological Physics, WIS

  • Date:
    10

    Tuesday

    December 2019

    Hour: 11:00 - 12:00,Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Event name: Molecular errors and evolvability

    Prof. Joanna Masel, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, The University of Arizona, USA

  • Date:
    09

    Monday

    December 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Event name: Trapped on the ribosome: exploring the chemical biology of translational control

    Prof. Jack Taunton, Dept. of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, University of California, San-Francisco

  • Date:
    03

    Tuesday

    December 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Molecular basis of neuronal self-avoidance

    Dr. Rotem Rubinstein, Tel-Aviv University

  • Date:
    26

    Tuesday

    November 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Structural design principles for specific RGS-G protein interactions

    Prof. Mickey Kosslof, Haifa University

  • Date:
    19

    Tuesday

    November 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Event name: Integrating 3D structure into Systems Biology

    Prof. Barry Honig, Columbia University

  • Date:
    12

    Tuesday

    November 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Bio-structural insights from solid state NMR: The small (Lithium) and the large (Phage)

    Prof. Amir Goldbourt, Tel Aviv University

  • Date:
    05

    Tuesday

    November 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Cooperative folding of polyglutamine helices in transcriptional regulators

    Dr. Xavier Salvatella,

  • Date:
    29

    Tuesday

    October 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Mass spectrometry reveals the chemistry of formaldehyde cross-linking in structured proteins

    Dr. Nir Kalisman, Dept. of Biological Chemistry The Hebrew University

  • Date:
    22

    Tuesday

    October 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: On the surface but not superficial: Towards a deeper understanding of membrane remodeling

    Dr. Ori Avinoam, Department of Biomolecular Sciences WIS

  • Date:
    22

    Sunday

    September 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Event name: The Long and Winding Road: From HIV Reverse Transcriptase Structure to Five Therapeutic Drugs, and New Insights into Viral Assembly and Maturation

    Prof. Eddy Arnold, Board of Governors Professor and Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers University

  • Date:
    03

    Tuesday

    September 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Event name: Dissecting the Axoneme Structure: New Insights into an Old Organelle

    Dr. Ron Orbach, Dept. of Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry Yale University

  • Date:
    06

    Tuesday

    August 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Why are there knots in proteins?

    Prof. Sophie Jackson, Department of Chemistry University of Cambridge United Kingdom

  • Date:
    21

    Sunday

    July 2019

    Hour: 11:00 - 12:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: An update on anti-TB drug discovery program against multi-drug resistant Tuberculosis

    Prof. V. Samuel Raj, SRM University, Delhi-NCR, Sonepat, India

  • Date:
    09

    Tuesday

    July 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Enhanced single-molecule imaging through mechanistic analysis of blinking and point-spread function engineering?

    Prof. Peter Dedecker, KU LEUVEN, BELGIUM

  • Date:
    02

    Tuesday

    July 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Balancing protein stability and strain for folding and function

    Prof. Elizabeth Meiering, University of Waterloo Canada

  • Date:
    25

    Tuesday

    June 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Development of small-molecule inhibitors targeting bacterial replication and translations

    Prof. Barak Akabayov, Ben Gurion University

  • Date:
    24

    Monday

    June 2019

    Hour: 11:00 - 12:30,Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Event name: Virus Structure: How Structural Biology Can Inform Function and Therapy

    Prof. David Stuart, MRC Professor of Structural Biology, Division of Structural Biology, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford,

  • Date:
    04

    Tuesday

    June 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Event name: From Membrane to Nucleus: the Molecular Logic of Notch Signal Transduction

    Prof. Stephen Blacklow, Harvard Medical School

  • Date:
    28

    Tuesday

    May 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Structural biology studies of a large DNA repair complex

    Dr. Michael Latham, Texas Tech University

  • Date:
    21

    Tuesday

    May 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Structural and Biophysical Characterization of Chloride Intracellular Channels Inherent Flexibility

    Dr. Yoni Haitin, Tel-Aviv University

  • Date:
    14

    Tuesday

    May 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Molecular basis for pH- and zinc-dependent protein quality control at the ER-Golgi interface

    Prof. Kenji Inaba, Professor of Biochemistry & Structural Biology Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University Sendai, Japan

  • Date:
    16

    Tuesday

    April 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Exploring the evolutionary origin of histone-based chromatin organisation

    Dr. Tobias Warnecke, Molecular Systems Group MRC London Institute of Medical Sciences (LMS) & Imperial College London

  • Date:
    26

    Tuesday

    March 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: SOD1 structure - Toward understanding of ALS pathogenesis

    Dr. Stas Engel, Ben Gurion University

  • Date:
    19

    Tuesday

    March 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Degron discovery: Hunt for the elusive dark matter of protein quality control

    Prof. Tommer Ravid, HUJI

  • Date:
    12

    Tuesday

    March 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: What makes tetra-ubiquitin a preferred signal for targeting proteins to the proteasome?

    Prof. Michael Glickman, Technion

  • Date:
    11

    Monday

    March 2019

    Hour: 11:00 - 12:00,Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Event name: Making the right disulfides-- the role of redox and protein structure

    Prof. Neil Bulleid, Director of the Institute of Molecular Cell & Systems Biology University of Glasgow

  • Date:
    05

    Tuesday

    March 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Structural Basis for Serum Amyloid A Function in Lipid Homeostasis and Immune Response: A Novel Function for an Ancient Protein

    Prof. Olga Gursky, Boston University School of Medicine

  • Date:
    26

    Tuesday

    February 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Diffusion-Enhanced Photon Inference (DEPI) for accurate retrieval of distance distributions in single-molecule FRET experiments

    Prof. Eitan Lerner, HUJI

  • Date:
    20

    Wednesday

    February 2019

    Hour: 10:00 - 11:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Protein assemblies ejected directly from native membranes yield complexes for mass spectrometry

    Dr. Dror Chorev, Oxford University, UK

  • Date:
    19

    Tuesday

    February 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Translocation Mechanisms of Protein-Antibiotics

    Dr. Ruth Cohen Khait, Oxford University, UK

  • Date:
    12

    Tuesday

    February 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Event name: Posing a contortionist E3 ubiquitin ligase for stepwise regulation of cell division

    Prof. Brenda Schulman,

  • Date:
    05

    Tuesday

    February 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: The molecular mechanism of Respiratory Syncytial virus assembly

    Dr. Monika Bajorek, from INRA, France

  • Date:
    29

    Tuesday

    January 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Need for new theory and simulations to understand protein behavior in cells

    Prof. Gary J. Pielak, Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA

  • Date:
    22

    Tuesday

    January 2019

    Hour: 11:00 - 12:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Proteins on membrane interfaces: Structure and dynamics of lipid-protein fibers from advanced fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy methodologies

    Prof. Manuel Prieto , Instituto Superior Técnico, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal

  • Date:
    15

    Tuesday

    January 2019

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: The marvelous Phycobilisome light harvesting system: revealing mechanisms that control the flow of energy

    Prof. Noam Adir, Dean, Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion

  • Date:
    18

    Tuesday

    December 2018

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Event name: Translational control of cancer and neurological disease via eIF4E

    Prof. Nahum Sonenberg , Department of Biochemistry McGill University, Montreal CANADA

  • Date:
    11

    Tuesday

    December 2018

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Event name: “Glycan Structure ON and OFF cells”

    Dr. Daron Freedberg, Center for Biologic Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration

  • Date:
    04

    Tuesday

    December 2018

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Development of an in silico method to characterize the interaction potential of protein surfaces in a crowded environment

    Dr. Hugo Schweke,

  • Date:
    27

    Tuesday

    November 2018

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Bacterial enzymes and mutants for chemoenzymatic synthesis of carbohydrates

    Prof. Xi Chen,

  • Date:
    13

    Tuesday

    November 2018

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Regulation of bidirectional motility of kinesin-5 motors

    Prof. Leah Gheber,

  • Date:
    06

    Tuesday

    November 2018

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: On Cholesterol Crystal Formation in Atherosclerosis

    Dr. Neta Varsano,

  • Date:
    23

    Tuesday

    October 2018

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Chemical Approaches to Study Oxidative Protein Folding

    Dr. Norman Metanis,

  • Date:
    16

    Tuesday

    October 2018

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: “Beauty and Benefits of cryo-EM; Resolving the 3D structure of the Type VII secretion system in Mycobacterium tuberculosis”

    Prof. Peter Peters, Maastricht Multimodal Molecular Imaging institute (M4I).

  • Date:
    17

    Tuesday

    July 2018

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Link between Myosin architecture and stepping dynamics of F-Actin

    Prof. Dave Thirumalai, Department of Chemistry, UT Austin

  • Date:
    03

    Tuesday

    July 2018

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: MODELING PROTEIN CONFORMATIONAL CHANGES WITH CROSS-LINKS AND SAXS PROFILES

    Dr. Dina Schneidman, Hebrew University

    Proteins generally populate multiple structural states in solution. Transitions between these states are important for function, such as allosteric signaling and enzyme catalysis. Structures solved by X-ray crystallography provide valuable, but static, atomic resolution structural information. In contrast, cross-linking mass spectrometry (XLMS) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) datasets contain information about conformational and compositional states of the system. The challenge lies in the data interpretation since the cross-links in the data often comes from multiple structural states. We have developed a novel computational method that simultaneously uncovers the set of structural states that are consistent with a given dataset (XLMS or SAXS). The input is a single atomic structure, a list of flexible residues, and an experimental dataset. The method finds multi-state models (models that specify two or more co-existing structural states) that are consistent with the data. The method was applied on multiple SAXS and XLMS datasets, including large multi-domain proteins and proteins with long disordered fragments. The applicability of the method extends to other datasets, such as 2D class averages from Electron Microscopy, and residual dipolar couplings.

    Close
  • Date:
    26

    Tuesday

    June 2018

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Structural view of the disordered multi-tasker WIP and its interaction network in human T cells

    Prof. Jordan Chill, Dept. of Chemistry, BIU

    WASP-Interacting Protein (WIP) is a multifunctional key participant in mediating actin-related cytoskeletal changes in human T cells. WIP is also an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP), lacking any significant secondary or tertiary structure across its 503 residues, and thus defies the ordinarily reliable structure-function paradigm. Our research focuses on how interactions between this ‘hub’ multi-tasker and its various structured binding partners delicately control T cell destiny, in particular the role played by disorder-to-order transitions. Three such critical protein-protein contacts involve the WIP N-terminal domain (with actin), a proline-rich central segment (with cortactin) and the C-terminal domain (with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein, WASP). The first two are of intermediate binding energy (KD ~ 50-3000 nM) and transiently modulate WIP interactions with the actin polymerization machinery. In contrast, the latter forms a tight complex with WASP and inhibits both its activity and eventual degradation in a phosphorylation-dependent manner, explaining why the hereditary Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome immunodeficiency results from WASP mutants unable to bind WIP. As an IDP, WIP ‘structure’ is essentially an ensemble of multiple conformations contributing to function, and this complexity gives solution NMR – armed with new IDP-optimized methodologies – unrivaled insight into how IDPs exert their biological influence. We established that transient structure in free WIPN and WIPC echoes their bound conformations, uncovering novel binding epitopes in the process. We also observed subtle ensemble shifts induced by environmental factors, such as temperature, denaturant or crowding agents, revealing the biophysics governing WIP behavior in the cellular environment. We further investigated the largest conformational change, experienced by WIPC upon binding to WASP, by determining the contribution of various WIP epitopes to complex affinity, and eventually the structure of the WIP-WASP complex. Finally, we offer an unexpected structural explanation for phosphorylation-induced dissociation of this complex that may explain how this phospho-switch controls WASP degradation. Taken together our results provide a comprehensive map of WIP structure and dynamics and how these affect its interaction with T cell binding partners, and highlight the great impact of high-resolution NMR studies upon the field of biologically active unstructured proteins.

    Close
  • Date:
    21

    Thursday

    June 2018

    Hour: 11:00 - 12:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: New era in cryo electron microscopy reflected in studies of a bacteriophage phage at near atomic resolution

    Prof. Elena Orlova, Institute of Structural and Molecular Biology, Birkbeck College, London

    During the last decade electron microscopy become a powerful tool in structural studies of large biological complexes. Cryo electron microscopy enabled us to reveal molecular dynamics of the complexes by analysis of samples in solution. This was made possible by long-standing efforts in sample preparations (cryo-EM imaging), in development of hardware, automation in data collection, methods in image analysis and, eventually, interpretation of results. Here I would like to share my experience in using these approaches in analysis of structural organisation of bacteriophages exemplified by the SPP1 phage. It is important to highlight critical steps in obtaining near-atomic resolution structures of the biocomplexes. We have obtained high resolution structures of main components of the phage such as a capsid and its nano-motor engaged into packaging of genome and its release.

    Close
  • Date:
    19

    Tuesday

    June 2018

    Hour: 13:00 - 16:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Mini Symposium: Biophysical Characterization by Light Scattering

    Dr. Dan Some, Wyatt Technology

  • Date:
    12

    Tuesday

    June 2018

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "There's More to Enzymes than Catalysis. Insights from Multiscale Simulations"

    Prof. Dan T Major, BIU

  • Date:
    15

    Tuesday

    May 2018

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: “Semi-synthetic protein-polymers enabled by organisms with an expanded genetic code”

    Dr. Mira Amiram, BGU

  • Date:
    08

    Tuesday

    May 2018

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Sculpted by self-replication"

    Dr. Shlomi Reuveni , TAU

    Many fine-scale features of ribosomes have been explained in terms of function, revealing a molecular machine that is optimized for error-correction, speed and control. In this talk, I will demonstrate mathematically that much less understood, larger-scale features of ribosomes—such as why RNA dominates the ribosome mass and why the ribosomal protein content is divided into 55–80 small and similarly sized segments—could all be explained by optimization for self-replication.

    Close
  • Date:
    29

    Sunday

    April 2018

    Hour: 11:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: 'Dynamic hydrogen-bond networks of proton transfer systems'

    Special Seminar

    Prof. Ana-Nicoleta Bondar , Molecular Biophysics with research Free University of Berlin

  • Date:
    20

    Friday

    April 2018

    Hour: 09:30,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: : “Structure of the ribosome from the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and its’ complex various antibacterial compounds”

    Zohar Eyal , Ph.D. student of Prof. Ada Yonath WIS

  • Date:
    17

    Tuesday

    April 2018

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: “Cellular controls on mineral formation in phytoplankton”

    Dr. Assaf Gal , Department of plant and environmental sciences WIS

  • Date:
    27

    Tuesday

    March 2018

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Myosin 19 is enzymatically adapted to transport Mitochondria “

    Prof. Arnon Henn,

  • Date:
    20

    Tuesday

    March 2018

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: “Mass spectrometry based proteomics: state of the art”

    Dr.Yishai Levin, G-Incpm center WIS

  • Date:
    19

    Monday

    March 2018

    Hour: 11:00 - 12:00,Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Event name: "AAA+ATPases: some assembly required (instructions not included)"

    2018 Sir John C. Kendrew Memorial Lecture

    Prof. James Berger, Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry Johns Hopkins University School OF Medicine

  • Date:
    18

    Sunday

    March 2018

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Event name: "Structural Basis for Calcium Release by RyR1 for Excitation-Contraction Coupling in Muscle"

    Prof. Wayne Hendrickson, Columbia University

  • Date:
    13

    Tuesday

    March 2018

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Computational design of enzymes, antibodies, and ultrahigh specificity interactions"

    Dr. Sarel Fleishman, Department of Biomolecular Sciences WIS

  • Date:
    06

    Tuesday

    March 2018

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: “Dynamic recognition in protein-DNA complexes studied by simulations and experiments”

    Prof. Carlos Simmerling, Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University

    In contrast to proteins recognizing small-molecule ligands, DNA-dependent enzymes cannot rely solely on interactions in the substrate-binding centre to achieve their exquisite specificity. It is widely believed that substrate recognition by such enzymes involves a series of conformational changes in the enzyme-DNA complex with sequential gates favoring cognate DNA and rejecting nonsubstrates. However, direct evidence for such mechanism is limited to a few systems. We used molecular dynamics simulations to explore the dynamic recognition of oxidative DNA damage by glycosylase enzymes. The resulting energy profiles, supported by biochemical analysis of site-directed mutants disturbing the interactions along the proposed path, show that the glycosylases selectively facilitate recognition by stabilizing several intermediate states, helping the rapidly sliding enzyme avoid full extrusion of every encountered base for interrogation. Lesion recognition through multiple gating intermediates may be a common theme in DNA repair enzymes; we show that human and bacterial enzymes share a common recognition mechansim despite lack of sequence or structural similarity of their glycosylases.

    Close
  • Date:
    25

    Sunday

    February 2018

    Hour: 10:00 - 11:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: “Low resolution Macromolecular and N-Linked Glycan Model-building using Coot”

    Special Seminar

    Prof. Paul Emsley, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology UK

  • Date:
    20

    Tuesday

    February 2018

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Protein modifications by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins: we know more but understand less "

    Dr. Reuven Wiener, Faculty of Medicine, HUJI

  • Date:
    18

    Sunday

    February 2018

    Hour: 10:00 - 11:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Atomic model refinement using cryoEM maps"

    Special seminar

    Prof. Garib Murshudov , MRC Cambridge U.K.

  • Date:
    16

    Tuesday

    January 2018

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: “Protein archeology: How proteins emerged and evolve?”

    Dr. Nir Ben-Tal, TAU

  • Date:
    26

    Tuesday

    December 2017

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: “Structure and mechanism of the two-component alpha-helical pore-forming toxin YaxAB”

    Dr. Bastian Braeuning, Technische Universität München Munich, Bayern, Germany Join institution

  • Date:
    26

    Tuesday

    December 2017

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Structure & mechanism of the two-component pore-forming toxin YaxAB"

    Dr. Bastian Braeuning, Technical University of Munich Department of Chemistry

  • Date:
    25

    Monday

    December 2017

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Event name: The QTY Code: A simple tool for membrane protein engineering. Subtitle: (Can you convert a hydrophobic alpha helix into a hydrophilic one?)

    Prof. Shuguang Zhang, Center for Biomedical Engineering, MIT

    Structure and function studies of membrane proteins, particularly G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and multiple segment transmembrane proteins, require detergents. Without detergents these integral membrane proteins aggregate and are nearly impossible to analyze. We have devised a useful tool, the QTY Code, for engineering hydrophobic domains to become detergent-free, namely water-soluble, without significantly altering protein structure and function. Here we report using the QTY Code (glutamine, threonine and tyrosine) to systematically replace the hydrophobic amino acids leucine, valine, isoleucine and phenylalanine in the four chemokine receptors CCR5, CXCR4, CCR10 and CXCR7. Our simple QTY Code is a useful tool and has implications for engineering water-soluble variants of previously water-insoluble and perhaps aggregated proteins including amyloids.

    Close
  • Date:
    19

    Tuesday

    December 2017

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "How changes to the cellular environment modulate protein structure, function, and interaction"

    Dr. Shahar Sukenik, University of Illinois

  • Date:
    12

    Tuesday

    December 2017

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Bistability and Multi-stability in Dynamic Protein Networks"

    Prof. Gonen Ashkenasy, BGU

  • Date:
    28

    Tuesday

    November 2017

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Nucleosome mobility and gene expression regulation: insights from single molecule studies"

    Prof. Ariel Kaplan, Technion

  • Date:
    21

    Tuesday

    November 2017

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "The single-molecule conformational dynamics an ABC transporter"

    Prof. Oded Lewinson, Technion

  • Date:
    14

    Tuesday

    November 2017

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Binding without folding: Extreme disorder and dynamics in a high-affinity protein complex "

    Prof. Benjamin Schuler, University of Zurich

    Molecular communication in biology is mediated by protein interactions. According to the current paradigm, the specificity and affinity required for these interactions are encoded in the precise complementarity of binding interfaces. Even proteins that are disordered under physiological conditions or that contain large unstructured regions commonly interact with well-structured binding sites on other biomolecules. We recently discovered the existence of an unexpected interaction mechanism: The two intrinsically disordered human proteins histone H1 and its nuclear chaperone prothymosin α associate in a one-to-one complex with picomolar affinity, but they fully retain their structural disorder, long-range flexibility, and highly dynamic character. Based on the close integration of single-molecule experiments, NMR, and molecular simulations, we obtain a detailed picture of this complex and show that the interaction can be explained by the large opposite net charge of the two proteins without requiring defined binding sites or interactions between specific individual residues

    Close
  • Date:
    19

    Thursday

    October 2017

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Image Scanning Microscopy and Metal Induced Energy Transfer: Enhancing Microscopy Resolution in All Directions"

    Special Seminar

    Prof. Jörg Enderlein, III. Institute of Physics – Biophysics Department of Physics Georg August University Germany

    Classical fluorescence microscopy is limited in resolution by the wavelength of light (diffraction limit) restricting lateral resolution to ca. 200 nm, and axial resolution to ca. 500 nm (at typical excitation and emission wavelengths around 500 nm). However, recent years have seen a tremendous development in high- and super-resolution techniques of fluorescence microscopy, pushing spatial resolution to its diffraction-dictated limits and much beyond. One of these techniques is Image Scanning Microscopy (ISM). In ISM, the focus of a conventional laser-scanning confocal microscope (LCSM) is scanned over the sample, but instead of recording only the total fluorescence intensity for each scan position, as done in conventional operation of an LCSM, one records a small image of the illuminated region. The result is a four-dimensional stack of data: two dimensions refer to the lateral scan position, and two dimensions to the pixel position on the chip of the image-recording camera. This set of data can then be used to obtain a super-resolved image with doubled resolution, completely analogously to what is achieved with Structured Illumination Microscopy. However, ISM is conceptually and technically much simpler, suffers less from sample imperfections like refractive index variations, and can easily be implemented into any existing LSCM. I will also present recent results of combining ISM with two-photon excitation, which is important for deep-tissue imaging of e.g. neuronal tissue, and for performing non-linear coherent microscopy such as second-harmonic generation. A second method which I will present is concerned with achieving nanometer resolution along the optical axis. It is called Metal Induced Energy Transfer or MIET and is based on the fact that, when placing a fluorescent molecule close to a metal, its fluorescence properties change dramatically. In particular, one observes a strongly modified lifetime of its excited state (Purcell effect). This coupling between an excited emitter and a metal film is strongly dependent on the emitter’s distance from the metal. We have used this effect for mapping the basal membrane of live cells with an axial accuracy of ~3 nm. The method is easy to implement and does not require any change to a conventional fluorescence lifetime microscope; it can be applied to any biological system of interest, and is compatible with most other super-resolution microscopy techniques which enhance the lateral resolution of imaging. Moreover, it is even applicable to localizing individual molecules, thus offering the prospect of three-dimensional single-molecule localization microscopy with nanometer isotropic resolution for structural biology.

    Close
  • Date:
    26

    Tuesday

    September 2017

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: “Selenium Atom-specific Derivatization of Nucleic Acids for Structure and Function Studies”

    Prof. Zhen Huang, Department of Chemistry and Department of Biology Georgia State University USA

  • Date:
    19

    Tuesday

    September 2017

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Signaling through cytokine/interferon receptors – outside and inside of the cell”

    Dr. Alexander Wlodawer, NIH-USA Center for Cancer Research National Cancer Institute

  • Date:
    06

    Wednesday

    September 2017

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: “Structural mechanisms of the biogenesis and polymerization of tubulin into microtubules”

    Special Seminar

    Dr. Jawdat Al-Bassam, University of California

  • Date:
    11

    Tuesday

    July 2017

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: “The Power of Small Molecules to Explain How We See and How We Think”

    Joint Seminar- Organic Chemistry & Structural Biology

    Prof. Nasri Nesnas, Department of Chemistry Florida Institute of Technology

    Vision is inarguably the most dependable of the five senses. The retina contains light sensing protein receptors (rhodopsins) that incorporate a small polyene molecule derivative of vitamin A, known as 11-cis-retinal. Major clues on understanding the visual cycle have been established through the design of variations of the vitamin A light absorbing molecule, some of which will be presented. A detailed understanding of the inner workings of rhodopsin is not only critical from the stand point of solving mysteries of visual diseases, like Age-related Macular Degeneration (the leading cause of blindness), but also serves as a well established model for elucidating the mechanism of other G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Furthermore, we show that the value of light absorbing molecules expands beyond vision and can be used to trigger neurons thereby aiding the delineation of complex neural networks.

    Close
  • Date:
    04

    Tuesday

    July 2017

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Applications of SEC-MALS to Protein Characterization"

    Dr.. Dan Some, Wyatt

    Conventional analytical size exclusion chromatography (SEC), often used to determine the solution molecular weight of proteins, is subject to inherent limitations and errors. Multi-angle light scattering (MALS) is a first-principles technique for determining the molar mass and size of macromolecules and nanoparticles in solution, independently of conformation. In combination with SEC, MALS overcomes these obstacles to characterize the biophysical properties of proteins and other biomolecules, including molecular weight, size, native oligomeric state, dynamic equilibria and degradation products. This seminar will present the failure modes of analytical SEC, fundamentals of SEC-MALS and examples of applications to a variety of proteins including IgG, insulin, glycoproteins, membrane proteins and protein complexes as well as viruses and virus-like particles. It will touch on the importance of protein quality control for reproducible science and provide a glimpse into how MALS can analyze complicated protein-protein interactions.

    Close
  • Date:
    27

    Tuesday

    June 2017

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Biologically Controlled Crystallization: The Image-Forming Mirror in the Eye of the Scallop"

    Dr. Benjamin Palmer , Dept. of Structural Biology WIS

  • Date:
    20

    Tuesday

    June 2017

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "The taste of molecules: selectivity, toxicity and effect on emotions"

    Prof. Masha Niv, The Institute of Biochemistry, Food Science and Nutrition, The Robert H Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, The Hebrew University

    The bitter taste sensation is elicited by molecules of widely varying chemical structure (http://bitterdb.agri.huji.ac.il/1) and prevents consumption of poisons, many of which are thought to be bitter. The bitter tastants are recognized by bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs), a subfamily of GPCRs2. Some of the receptors are orphan, or have few known ligands, while others can be activated by numerous, structurally dissimilar compounds3. Furthermore, some compounds are selective towards a single TAS2R, while others activate multiple TAS2Rs. We show that TAS2R-promiscuous and TAS2R-selective bitter molecules differ in size, globularity, and other properties, and develop a selectivity predictor. Selective TAS2Rs are activated by promiscuous compounds, which are anyway recognized by additional TAS2Rs. Thus, unique ligands, that may have been the evolutionary driving force for the development of selective TAS2Rs, still need to be unraveled4. BitterPredict is a new machine-learning based bitterness prediction tool (Dagan-Wiener et al, in revision). It predicts 70% of FDA-approved drugs, but less than 40% of toxic compounds, to be bitter. Additionally, bitter compounds have higher LD50 values (indicating less toxicity) than toxic compounds, challenging the paradigm "bitterness signals toxicity". Interestingly, bitter mouth-rinse leads to lower PANAS mood scores and the effect depends on perceiving the solution as bitter, raising further questions about bitterness in the context of food consumption5. In summary, we explore the selectivity of bitter compounds towards their receptors, and show that the bitterness-toxicity overlap is partial. This supports the idea that activation of bitter taste receptors, which are expressed both orally and extra-orally, has physiological roles beyond alerting against poisons. [1] Wiener, A., Shudler, M., Levit, A., and Niv, M. Y. (2012) BitterDB: a database of bitter compounds, Nucleic acids research 40, D413-419. [2] Di Pizio, A., and Niv, M. Y. (2014) Computational Studies of Smell and Taste Receptors, Israel Journal of Chemistry 54, 1205-1218. [3] Levit, A., Nowak, S., Peters, M., Wiener, A., Meyerhof, W., Behrens, M., and Niv, M. Y. (2014) The bitter pill: clinical drugs that activate the human bitter taste receptor TAS2R14, Faseb J 28, 1181-1197. [4] Di Pizio, A., and Niv, M. Y. (2015) Promiscuity and selectivity of bitter molecules and their receptors, Bioorg Med Chem 23, 4082-4091. [5] Dubovski, N., Ert, E., and Niv, M. Y. (2017) Bitter mouth-rinse affects emotions, Food Quality and Preference 60, 154-164.

    Close
  • Date:
    08

    Thursday

    June 2017

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: “Molecular chaperones inject energy from ATP hydrolysis into the non-equilibrium stabilisation of native proteins”

    Special Departmental Seminar

    Prof. Pierre Goloubinoff, University of Lausanne

  • Date:
    06

    Tuesday

    June 2017

    Hour: 13:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "New Structure-activity Paradigms for Amyloids from Pathogenic Microbes"

    Prof.Meytal Landau, Technion

  • Date:
    06

    Tuesday

    June 2017

    Hour: 09:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Mechanisms of bone surface sensing by osteoclasts"

    Michal Shemesh, WIS Departments of Structural Biology and Molecular Cell Biology

  • Date:
    16

    Tuesday

    May 2017

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Single-molecule spectroscopy of the Myc-Max-Mad transcription factor network "

    Dr. Renee Vancraenenbroeck , Dr. Hagen Hofmann’s group

  • Date:
    09

    Tuesday

    May 2017

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Event name: "New insights about transcription dynamics at the single molecule level using ultra-high resolution optical tweezers and novel analysis algorithms"

    Dr. Ronen Gabizon, California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences, University of California, Berkeley

    Transcription elongation by RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a complex process involving binding of nucleotides, conformational changes, catalytic steps, and translocation on the DNA template. The processive elongation is interspersed with transcriptional pauses, which play critical roles in coordinating transcription with processes such as translation, splicing and DNA repair. While many mechanisms contributing to pausing have been characterized, it is not clear how transcriptional dynamics of RNA polymerase change at pause sites, and how those dynamics lead to the formation of various paused states. I will present high-resolution optical tweezers experiments in which we characterize the transcription of individual E. coli RNA polymerase molecules through repeating templates. Combining the assay with novel methods of data analysis, we were able to separately investigate the pausing dynamics at different sites for pauses as short as 100 msec, and test how these dynamics are affected by applied force, backtracking and RNA structure formation. Our experiments revealed that: 1. Multiple mechanisms act in synergy to promote pausing in a site-specific manner; 2. RNA structure interacts primarily with the pretranslocated state of RNAP and can both promote or prevent pausing; 3. Backtracked pause states are formed in a site-specific manner and can only be accessed from preexisting paused states. In the second part of the talk I will discuss the application of optical tweezers towards characterizing the stepping behavior of RNA polymerase during active elongation. Individual base-pair steps (~ 3.4 Å) have been observed before in optical tweezers assays but only anecdotally and for short segments of transcription traces. By combining an ultra-high resolution optical tweezers system with a Large-state-space Hidden Markov Model step finding algorithm, we are now able to obtain for the first time full, extended molecular trajectories of RNAP with single base-pair resolution.

    Close
  • Date:
    03

    Wednesday

    May 2017

    Hour: 11:00 - 12:00,Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Event name: "Biogenesis and Quality Control of Membrane Proteins"

    Dr. Ramanujan Hegde , Sir John C. Kendrew Memorial Lecture Cambridge UK

  • Date:
    03

    Wednesday

    May 2017

    Hour: 11:00 - 12:00,Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Event name: "Biogenesis and Quality Control of Membrane Proteins"

    2017 Sir John C. Kendrew Memorial Lecture

    Dr. Ramanujan Hegde , group leader MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology

  • Date:
    25

    Tuesday

    April 2017

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: “Development of novel antimicrobial agents”

    Dr. Zvi Hayouka, HUJI

  • Date:
    05

    Wednesday

    April 2017

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Event name: “How neurons use protocadherins to distinguish self from non-self”

    Special Seminar

    Prof. Barry Honig, Colombia University

  • Date:
    30

    Thursday

    March 2017

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Directed Evolution of G Protein-Coupled Receptors: Enabling Structural Biology of previously inaccessible GPCRs"

    Special Seminar

    Jendrik Schöppe, University of Zurich

  • Date:
    28

    Tuesday

    March 2017

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Dynamics and interactions of intrinsically disordered proteins probed with single-molecule spectroscopy"

    Dr. Franziska Zosel, University of Zurich

  • Date:
    13

    Monday

    March 2017

    Hour: 10:00,Location: Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Event name: "Iridophore Cell Control over Guanine Crystal Orientation is Pre-Determined at the Individual Cell Level "

    Nir Funt, Master thesis defense

  • Date:
    28

    Tuesday

    February 2017

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Systemic Ig Light-Chain Amyloidosis: Molecular Basis of Assembly."

    Dr. Boris Brumshtein, Dept. Chemistry and Biochemistry UCLA

  • Date:
    07

    Tuesday

    February 2017

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: “Mapping binding landscapes through computation and experiment”

    Dr. Julia Shifman, Department of Biological Chemistry Hebrew University

  • Date:
    24

    Tuesday

    January 2017

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: 'Recognition determinants of broadly neutralizing human antibodies against dengue viruses and structural basis of their potent Zika/dengue cross-neutralization.'

    Dr. Alexander Rouvinski, Faculty of Medicine The Hebrew University

  • Date:
    24

    Tuesday

    January 2017

    Hour: 10:00,Location: Herman Mayer Campus Guesthouse. Maison de France
    Event name: “Formation of Amorphous Calcium Carbonate in Sea Urchin Embryos”

    Keren Kahil , M.Sc. student of Prof. Lia Addadi and Prof. Steve Weiner Department of Structural Biology

  • Date:
    17

    Tuesday

    January 2017

    Hour: All day,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Copper homeostasis in bacteria cells – exploring cellular metal transfer mechanisms using EPR spectroscopy"

    Dr. Sharon Ruthstein, BIU

  • Date:
    03

    Tuesday

    January 2017

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: “Computer Controlled Molecular Motor Made of DNA”

    Dr. Eyal Nir, Department of Chemistry BGU

  • Date:
    27

    Tuesday

    December 2016

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: " Visualizing the Molecular Sociology in Cells and Tissues: Cryo-FIB Preparations Aimed at in situ Cryo-Electron Tomography”

    Dr. Julia Mahamid, Department of Molecular Structural Biology Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry Germany

  • Date:
    20

    Tuesday

    December 2016

    Hour: 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "The protein folding problem: Slow progress using ultrafast spectroscopy and kinetics"

    Prof. Elisha Haas, Head - Biophysics Program BIU

  • Date:
    20

    Tuesday

    December 2016

    Hour: 11:00,Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Event name: "Tuning an Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone"

    Prof. David Ron, University of Cambridge

  • Date:
    13

    Tuesday

    December 2016

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Investigations of Eukaryotic Translation Machineries through Single Particle Cryo-EM

    Dr. Moran Shalev-Benami, Department of Structural Biology WIS

  • Date:
    29

    Tuesday

    November 2016

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Hydrogen/Deuterium exchange mass spectrometry reveals the Li+-induced global conformational dynamics of the NhaA Na+/H+ antiporter

    Prof. Etana Padan, Dept. of Biological Chemistry Hebrew University

  • Date:
    17

    Thursday

    November 2016

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: “Can we dissociate amyloid plaques with light?”

    Dr. Grzegorz Wieczorek & Dr.Dorota Niedzialek, Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Science And International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology

  • Date:
    15

    Tuesday

    November 2016

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "The interplay between structured and disordered domains in proteins"

    Prof. Assaf Friedler, Institute of Chemistry Hebrew University

  • Date:
    08

    Tuesday

    November 2016

    Hour: 11:00 - 12:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Carbon Monoxide-based Therapeutics

    Prof. Binghe Wang , Department of Chemistry Georgia State University

  • Date:
    01

    Tuesday

    November 2016

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Understanding drug resistance to targeted therapy in cancer: a computer-based approach”

    Dr. Ran Friedman, Linnaeus University Sweden

  • Date:
    15

    Thursday

    September 2016

    Hour: 11:00 - 12:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: An evolution-based approach to de novo protein design

    Prof. Pralay Mitra, Department of Computer Science & Engineering Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur

  • Date:
    07

    Wednesday

    September 2016

    Hour: 13:00,Location: Michael and Anna Wix Auditorium
    Event name: "The Formation and Light Manipulation Properties of Biogenic Guanine Based Photonic Crystal"

    Dvir Gur,

  • Date:
    29

    Wednesday

    June 2016

    Hour: 10:00 - 11:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: ” On the mineralization pathway in sea urchin larval spicules"

    Student Seminar

    Netta Vidavsky, Ph.D student of Prof. Steve Weiner & Prof. Lia Addadi

  • Date:
    07

    Tuesday

    June 2016

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Cross-talk between redox regulation and protein homeostasis

    Dr. Dana Reichmann, Department of Biological Chemistry The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

  • Date:
    26

    Thursday

    May 2016

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Single-molecule views of eukaryotic DNA mismatch repair

    Prof. Ilya Finkelstein, Department of Molecular Biosciences & ICMB University of Texas at Austin

  • Date:
    24

    Tuesday

    May 2016

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: How SAGA reads, writes and erases the histone code

    Prof. Cynthia Wolberger, Department of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

  • Date:
    23

    Monday

    May 2016

    Hour: 11:00,Location: Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
    Event name: “New Engineered Proteins for Signaling”

    Sir John C. Kendrew Memorial Lecture

    Prof. James Wells , Departments of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Cellular & Molecular Pharmacology, University of California at San Francisco, CA, USA

  • Date:
    19

    Thursday

    May 2016

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Advances in the synthesis and biomedical application of peptide turn mimics”

    Special Joint Seminar Organic Chemistry & Structural Biology - Prof. William D. Lubell

    Prof. William D. Lubell, Department of Chemistry University of Montréal Canada

  • Date:
    17

    Tuesday

    May 2016

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Continuous symmetry measures in protein structural analyses

    Prof. David Avnir, The Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University

  • Date:
    10

    Tuesday

    May 2016

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: The dark side of the genome - Single molecule analysis of genomic features

    Dr. Yuval Ebenstein, Department of Chemical Physics, Tel Aviv University

  • Date:
    20

    Wednesday

    April 2016

    Hour: 12:00,Location:
    Event name: "Structural and dynamic investigation of bone mineralization processes in the zebrafish larva".

    Student Seminar -Thesis defense

    Anat Akiva, Ph.D student of Prof. Steve Weiner & Prof. Lia Addadi

  • Date:
    19

    Tuesday

    April 2016

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Protein and genome engineering for the study of DNA replication in eukaryotes

    Prof. Amir Aharoni, Department of Life Sciences Ben Gurion University

  • Date:
    12

    Tuesday

    April 2016

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Evolution Through Cooperativity in the Alkaline Phosphatase Superfamily

    Prof. Lynn Kamerlin, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology (ICM) Uppsala University, Sweden

  • Date:
    05

    Tuesday

    April 2016

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Predicting the evolutionary pathway to virulence of an RNA virus

    Dr. Adi Stern,

  • Date:
    22

    Tuesday

    March 2016

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Post-translational modifications as studied by methods for genetic code expansion

    Dr. Eyal Arbeli, Department of Chemistry Ben Gurion University

  • Date:
    15

    Tuesday

    March 2016

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Cryo Microscopies: From detailed macromolecular architecture by cryoEM to whole cells by cryo Soft X-rays Tomography"

    Prof. Jose-Maria Carazo, National Center of Biotechnology Madrid

  • Date:
    11

    Thursday

    February 2016

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Learning Nature’s Strategies for Making Unusual Sugars:

    Biosynthesis of 2-thioglucose in BE-7585A

    Prof. Hung-wen Liu, University of Texas at Austin, Austin

  • Date:
    19

    Tuesday

    January 2016

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: How folded is unfolded and how unfolded is folded?

    Dr. Mariusz Jaremko, The Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry Göttingen, Germany

  • Date:
    14

    Thursday

    January 2016

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Event name: Packing of Spheres and Molecules

    Dr. Zbyszek Dauter, Head, Synchrotron Radiation Research Section Center for Cancer Research National Cancer Institute

  • Date:
    13

    Wednesday

    January 2016

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Membrane proteins structure and dynamics - they both matter

    Dr. Lukasz Jaremko, The Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry Göttingen, Germany

  • Date:
    05

    Tuesday

    January 2016

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Combinatorial protein engineering of proteolytically resistant mesotrypsin inhibitors as candidates for cancer therapy

    Dr. Niv Papo, Department of Biotechnology Engineering Faculty of Engineering Sciences Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

  • Date:
    15

    Tuesday

    December 2015

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: LC-MS/MS and Next Generation Sequencing for High-resolution analysis of the breadth and polarization of human antibody repertoires

    Dr. Yariv Wine, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology Tel-Aviv University

  • Date:
    24

    Tuesday

    November 2015

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "What Have We Learned from MAS NMR on Biomaterial Interfaces: Examples from Bone-like Apatite and Bioinspired Silica"

    Dr. Gil Goobes, Bar Ilan University

  • Date:
    10

    Tuesday

    November 2015

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Aiming at the sweet spot of disease

    Dr. Vered Padler-Karavani, Laboratory of Glycoimmunology Department of Cell Research and Immunology Tel Aviv University

  • Date:
    27

    Tuesday

    October 2015

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Programmable On-Chip DNA Compartments as Artificial Cells

    Prof. Roy Bar-Ziv, Department of Materials and Interfaces WIS

  • Date:
    08

    Tuesday

    September 2015

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Achieving mechanistic understanding in membrane protein systems using Cryo-electron microscopy: case studies of the HIV-1 core formation and human P-glycoprotein

    Dr. Gabriel A. Frank , Laboratory of Cell Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, NIH

  • Date:
    01

    Tuesday

    September 2015

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Cryo-electron microscopy for in situ structural biology

    Dr. Tanmay Bharat , MRC

  • Date:
    25

    Tuesday

    August 2015

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Some Aspects of External Electric Field-Effects on Small Molecules and their Reactivity

    Prof. Cherif Matta, Dept. of Chemistry & Physics Mount Saint Vincent University

  • Date:
    30

    Tuesday

    June 2015

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Conformational Control of Neurotransmitter Biosynthesis

    Dr. Itamar Kass, Monash University Melbourne, Australia

  • Date:
    14

    Sunday

    June 2015

    Hour: 11:00 - 12:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Herpesvirus Life Cycle: Structural View

    Dr. Tzviya Zeev-Ben-Mordehai,

  • Date:
    02

    Tuesday

    June 2015

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Crystal structure of phoshotransmitter AHP2 and modelling of its interaction with the receiver domain of sensor histidine kinase CKI1 – towards specificity in the multistep phosphorelay signaling in plants

    Dr. Oksana Degtjarik,

  • Date:
    26

    Tuesday

    May 2015

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: High- and Super-Resolution Fluorescence Microscopy

    Prof. Joerg Enderlein , Georg-August-University Göttingen

  • Date:
    19

    Tuesday

    May 2015

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Doing accurate ab-initio structure prediction for >1000 protein families without a known structure using improved contact predictions

    Prof. Arne Elofsson, Science for Life Laboratory Stockholm University

  • Date:
    12

    Tuesday

    May 2015

    Hour: 14:00 - 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Structural modeling, dynamics and ion selectivity of the human copper transporter CTR1

    Dr. Nir Ben-Tal, Tel Aviv University

  • Date:
    28

    Tuesday

    April 2015

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: New Insights into the Transport Mechanism of the Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporter Family

    Dr. Lina Malinauskaite, University of Oxford

  • Date:
    14

    Tuesday

    April 2015

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: ESCRT mediated mammalian cell abscission: New tools, new players and new inhibitors

    Dr. Natalie Elia, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

  • Date:
    12

    Sunday

    April 2015

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: The Formation of the Ion-Conducting Pore in Channelrhodopsin-2

    Kirstin Eisenhauer , Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany

  • Date:
    31

    Tuesday

    March 2015

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Beyond the consensus: The role of the motif environment on transcription factor binding"

    Dr.Yael Mandel-Gutfreund, Faculty of Biology, the Technion

  • Date:
    31

    Tuesday

    March 2015

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Beyond the consensus: The role of the motif environment on transcription factor binding"

    Dr. Yael Mandel-Gutfreund, Faculty of Biology, Technion

  • Date:
    24

    Tuesday

    March 2015

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Magic angle spinning NMR as a robust tool to study biomolecules: Elucidating the atomic resolution structure of the M13 bacteriophage virus "

    Dr. Amir Goldbourt, School of Chemistry Tel Aviv University

  • Date:
    23

    Monday

    March 2015

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: Integral membrane pyrophosphatases and the evolution of proton pumping

    Prof. Adrian Goldman, Chair in Membrane Biology The Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology University of Leeds Leeds, UK

  • Date:
    19

    Thursday

    March 2015

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "News from the protein fold space”

    Prof. Dmitrij Frishman , Technische Universität München

  • Date:
    12

    Thursday

    March 2015

    Hour: 11:00 - 12:00,Location: Michael and Anna Wix Auditorium
    Event name: Giant protein assemblies in nature and by design

    Prof. Todd Yeates, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry UCLA

  • Date:
    10

    Tuesday

    March 2015

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Recruitment of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 to chromatin by RNA"

    Dr. Chen Davidovich, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry University of Colorado U.S.A

  • Date:
    03

    Tuesday

    March 2015

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Nucleosome dynamics studied by computer simulation and single molecule spectroscopy"

    Prof. Jorg Langowski, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ)

  • Date:
    27

    Tuesday

    January 2015

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Protein-DNA binding in the absence of specific base-pair recognition"

    Dr. David Lukatsky, BGU

  • Date:
    06

    Tuesday

    January 2015

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: “Molecular-structural insights into biomineralization and biomimetic pathways by solid state NMR”

    Dr. Asher Schmidt , Faculty of Chemistry Technion

  • Date:
    30

    Tuesday

    December 2014

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: “HIV use of alternative routes through cellular pathways”

    Dr. Akram Alian , Faculty of Biology Technion

  • Date:
    29

    Monday

    December 2014

    Hour: 14:00,Location: The David Lopatie Hall of Graduate Studies
    Event name: "The gizzard plates in the Cephalaspidean gastropod Philine aperta: analysis of structure and function"

    Margarita Kovtanyuk , M.Sc. student of Prof. Steve Weiner & Prof. Lia Addadi

  • Date:
    29

    Monday

    December 2014

    Hour: 14:00,Location: The David Lopatie Hall of Graduate Studies
    Event name: "The gizzard plates in the Cephalaspidean gastropod Philine aperta: analysis of structure and function"

    Margarita Kovtanyuk , M.Sc. student of Prof. Steve Weiner & Prof. Lia Addadi

  • Date:
    23

    Tuesday

    December 2014

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Conformational changes in GPCR signalling"

    Dr. Dmitry Veprintsev, Laboratory of Biomolecular Research Paul Scherrer Institut Switzerland

  • Date:
    16

    Tuesday

    December 2014

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Macromolecular structure and dynamics from integration of multiple experimental methods"

    Dr. Dina Schneidman, University of California

  • Date:
    09

    Tuesday

    December 2014

    Hour: 14:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Structure-Function of the Slit-Robo-srGAP Signaling Axis"

    Dr.Yarden Opatowsky, Structural Biology Lab BIU

  • Date:
    02

    Tuesday

    December 2014

    Hour: 08:30 - 09:30,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Unraveling the mechanism of protein disaggregation through Methyl-TROSY NMR"

    Dr. Rina Rosenzweig, Department of Biology University of Toronto

  • Date:
    25

    Tuesday

    November 2014

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: “Fidelity of Translation: Universal Pathway of Editing Reactions”

    Prof. Mark Safro, Department of Structural Biology WIS

  • Date:
    18

    Tuesday

    November 2014

    Hour: 14:00 - 15:00,Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Event name: "Elusive Conformational States in Proteins:

    Dr. Jordan Chill, Department of Chemistry BIU

    We think of proteins as ensembles of several mutually-interconverting conformations, and therefore protein 'structure' actually refers to a weighted representation of all conformers contributing to protein behavior. Less intuitive yet very important is the fact that the biological function of proteins depends sometimes upon elusive minor conformers that might be overlooked by a superficial static view. This realization has pushed bio-NMR, a leading solution-based structural method, to the forefront of efforts to identify and, if possible, actually 'see' lowly-populated conformations. The ability of high-resolution NMR to follow and characterize these nearly invisible unsung heroes of protein function will be demonstrated using three case-studies from our research group, (i) intrinsically disordered proteins that challenge the fundamental structure-function dogma, (ii) an under-appreciated pH-dependent oligomerization domain, and (iii) inhibition of a potassium channel by a marine toxin. Together these examples highlight the versatility of solution NMR in illuminating the molecular basis of biological functions involving protein conformational flexibility.

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