All events, All years

Volatile cortical working memory representations crystalize with practice

Lecture
Date:
Thursday, June 1, 2023
Hour: 12:30 - 13:30
Location:
Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Prof. Peyman Golshani
|
David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA

Working memory (WM), the process through which information is transiently maintained and manipulated over a brief period of time, is essential for most cognitive functions. However, the mechanisms underlying the generation and stability of WM neuronal representations at the population level remain elusive. To uncover these mechanisms, we trained head-fixed mice to perform  an olfactory working memory task and used optogenetics to delineate circuits causal for behavioral performance. We used mesoscopic and light bead  two photon imaging to record from up to 35,000 secondary motor cortical neurons simulataneously across multiple days and show differential stabilization of different task parameters with learning and practice of the task. We find that cortical working memory representations causal for task performance are highly volatile but only stabilize after multiple days of practice well after task learning. We hypothesize that representational drift soon after learning may allow for higher levels of flexibility for new task rules.  I will also review some of the new open-source tools developed for large-scale imaging of neural activity patterns in freely behaving animals.

Cognitive neuroscience of learning and memory in human infants

Lecture
Date:
Tuesday, May 30, 2023
Hour: 12:30 - 13:30
Location:
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
Prof. Nick Turk-Browne
|
Dept of Psychology, Yale University

In this talk, I will present the approach my lab has developed for performing fMRI studies in awake infants during cognitive tasks. I will share some of our recent studies and highlight some of the big open questions that remain to be addressed, with potential to reveal the brain systems underlying how infants perceive and attend to their environment, why infants are such proficient learners, and why we all have amnesia for infant experiences. Despite countless limitations and challenges at present, this work suggests that awake infant fMRI could become more feasible, useful, and ubiquitous in cognitive neuroscience.

The neurocircuit underlying social approach and avoidance behavior

Lecture
Date:
Tuesday, May 23, 2023
Hour: 12:30 - 13:30
Location:
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
Prof. Camilla Bellone
|
Dept of Basic Neurosciences Faculty of Medicine University of Geneva

The ability to approach or avoid conspecifics is essential for survival in many species, and the nature of the social interaction often determines it. Positive or rewarding interactions with conspecifics lead individuals to approach them, while aversive or threatening interactions lead individuals to avoid them. The rewarding or aversive nature of these interactions is defined as social valence. I will discuss the neuronal circuits and mechanisms underlying social valance encoding.  

Illuminating neural computations with structured light and sound wavefronts

Lecture
Date:
Sunday, May 21, 2023
Hour: 12:30
Location:
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
Prof. Shy Shoham
|
Neural Interface Engineering lab, NYU

Features and Objects as Perceptual Attractors: Theory, Paradigm, and Results from The Rat’s Whisker System

Lecture
Date:
Monday, May 15, 2023
Hour: 11:00 - 12:15
Location:
Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Guy Nelinger, Student Seminar - PhD Thesis Defense
|
Prof. Ehud Ahissar Lab

Perceivers experience the world around them as organized, with sensory impressions clearly separated into entities. What makes a perceptual object, and what framework relates it to its composing features? A key insight is that under natural conditions, feature and object information is acquired actively, via sensor movements. Motor and sensory variables affect one another reciprocally, forming a closed-loop system. I therefore hypothesize that percepts signifying an object emerge when the motor-sensory loop’s dynamics converge towards a stable attractor. Using snout and whisker tracking data from freely-moving behaving rats, I outline such an attractor for object detection. I demonstrate that whisker-object contact elicits robust signals on a motor-sensory phase-plane, comprised of the derivatives of whisker base-angle and base-curvature. Over consecutive contact epochs, trajectories on the phase-plane converge to a specific area. The area is characterized by a basin of attraction during contact, more so than in free-air whisking. Differences in head-movement behavior are associated with proximity to the attractor, suggesting that the animal makes use of this proposed coding-scheme. Finally, to build upon these insights, I present a novel paradigm for the study of volitional perceptual exploration, in both rewarded and unrewarded contexts. It supports high-resolution study of motor-sensory development starting at birth, throughout task-learning and until mastery. Taken together, these results highlight a novel framework for the study of the perception of features and objects as motor-sensory attractors.

Smell and our unconscious sense of self

Lecture
Date:
Wednesday, May 10, 2023
Hour: 13:00 - 14:00
Location:
Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Prof. Benjamin D. Young
|
Institute for Neuroscience University of Nevada, Reno

Benjamin D. Young Ph.D. is an associate professor in philosophy and interdisciplinary neuroscience at the University of Nevada, Reno. Previously he held a Kreitman Post-Doctoral Fellowship in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at Ben-Gurion University, as well as Visiting Assistant Professorship and Post-Doctoral Fellowship in the Department of Cognitive Science at Hebrew University. He conducts empirically informed philosophical research with a particular emphasis on olfaction focusing on non-conceptual content, qualitative consciousness in the absence of awareness, and the perceptible objects of smell. His most recent projects include co-editing the textbook Mind, Cognition, and Neuroscience and the collection Theoretical Perspectives on Smell. Ben is finishing a book on smell tentatively titled Stinking Philosophy! and beginning to work on a book about the unconscious mind. Previously he showed how olfaction calls into question the general neuroscientific theories of consciousness and the relationship between access and phenomenal consciousness. Dr. Young’s current research extends this framework and examines the role that smell plays in allowing us to recognize our embodied material composition and what we can perceive about others from their smell both with and without subjective awareness. For more information about Ben’s research see https://www.unr.edu/philosophy/faculty-staff/benjamin-young

An Innate Immunity Pathway Against Invading Microbes Targets the Paternal Mitochondria for Destruction after Fertilization

Lecture
Date:
Wednesday, May 10, 2023
Hour: 10:00 - 11:15
Location:
Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Prof. Eli Arama
|
Dept of Molecular Genetics, WIS

Nature, nurture, and the neuroscience of parenthood

Lecture
Date:
Tuesday, May 2, 2023
Hour: 12:30 - 13:30
Location:
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
Prof. Bianca Jones Marlin
|
Zuckerman Institute Columbia University, New York

Introduction: Bianca Jones Marlin, Ph.D. is a neuroscientist and Herbert and Florence Irving Assistant Professor of Cell Research at the Zuckerman Institute at Columbia University in New York City. Her research investigates how organisms unlock innate behaviors at appropriate times, and how learned information is passed to subsequent generations via transgenerational epigenetic inheritance. Dr. Marlin combines neural imaging, behavior, and molecular genetics to uncover how learned behavior in the parent can become innate behavior in the offspring— work that promises to make a profound impact on societal brain health, mental well-being, and parenting. For more information about Dr. Marlin, visit www.biancajonesmarlin.com

Nature, nurture, and the neuroscience of parenthood

Lecture
Date:
Tuesday, May 2, 2023
Hour: 12:30 - 13:30
Location:
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
Prof. Bianca Jones Marlin
|
Zuckerman Institute Columbia University, New York

Introduction: Bianca Jones Marlin, Ph.D. is a neuroscientist and Herbert and Florence Irving Assistant Professor of Cell Research at the Zuckerman Institute at Columbia University in New York City. Her research investigates how organisms unlock innate behaviors at appropriate times, and how learned information is passed to subsequent generations via transgenerational epigenetic inheritance. Dr. Marlin combines neural imaging, behavior, and molecular genetics to uncover how learned behavior in the parent can become innate behavior in the offspring— work that promises to make a profound impact on societal brain health, mental well-being, and parenting. For more information about Dr. Marlin, visit www.biancajonesmarlin.com

Correlated light and electron microscopy reveal recurrent circuit motives in the zebrafish hindbrain visual integrator network

Lecture
Date:
Monday, April 17, 2023
Hour: 12:45 - 13:30
Location:
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
Prof. Armin Bahl
|
Department of Biology University of Konstanz, Germany

Pages

All events, All years

Volatile cortical working memory representations crystalize with practice

Lecture
Date:
Thursday, June 1, 2023
Hour: 12:30 - 13:30
Location:
Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Prof. Peyman Golshani
|
David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA

Working memory (WM), the process through which information is transiently maintained and manipulated over a brief period of time, is essential for most cognitive functions. However, the mechanisms underlying the generation and stability of WM neuronal representations at the population level remain elusive. To uncover these mechanisms, we trained head-fixed mice to perform  an olfactory working memory task and used optogenetics to delineate circuits causal for behavioral performance. We used mesoscopic and light bead  two photon imaging to record from up to 35,000 secondary motor cortical neurons simulataneously across multiple days and show differential stabilization of different task parameters with learning and practice of the task. We find that cortical working memory representations causal for task performance are highly volatile but only stabilize after multiple days of practice well after task learning. We hypothesize that representational drift soon after learning may allow for higher levels of flexibility for new task rules.  I will also review some of the new open-source tools developed for large-scale imaging of neural activity patterns in freely behaving animals.

Cognitive neuroscience of learning and memory in human infants

Lecture
Date:
Tuesday, May 30, 2023
Hour: 12:30 - 13:30
Location:
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
Prof. Nick Turk-Browne
|
Dept of Psychology, Yale University

In this talk, I will present the approach my lab has developed for performing fMRI studies in awake infants during cognitive tasks. I will share some of our recent studies and highlight some of the big open questions that remain to be addressed, with potential to reveal the brain systems underlying how infants perceive and attend to their environment, why infants are such proficient learners, and why we all have amnesia for infant experiences. Despite countless limitations and challenges at present, this work suggests that awake infant fMRI could become more feasible, useful, and ubiquitous in cognitive neuroscience.

The neurocircuit underlying social approach and avoidance behavior

Lecture
Date:
Tuesday, May 23, 2023
Hour: 12:30 - 13:30
Location:
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
Prof. Camilla Bellone
|
Dept of Basic Neurosciences Faculty of Medicine University of Geneva

The ability to approach or avoid conspecifics is essential for survival in many species, and the nature of the social interaction often determines it. Positive or rewarding interactions with conspecifics lead individuals to approach them, while aversive or threatening interactions lead individuals to avoid them. The rewarding or aversive nature of these interactions is defined as social valence. I will discuss the neuronal circuits and mechanisms underlying social valance encoding.  

Illuminating neural computations with structured light and sound wavefronts

Lecture
Date:
Sunday, May 21, 2023
Hour: 12:30
Location:
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
Prof. Shy Shoham
|
Neural Interface Engineering lab, NYU

Features and Objects as Perceptual Attractors: Theory, Paradigm, and Results from The Rat’s Whisker System

Lecture
Date:
Monday, May 15, 2023
Hour: 11:00 - 12:15
Location:
Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Guy Nelinger, Student Seminar - PhD Thesis Defense
|
Prof. Ehud Ahissar Lab

Perceivers experience the world around them as organized, with sensory impressions clearly separated into entities. What makes a perceptual object, and what framework relates it to its composing features? A key insight is that under natural conditions, feature and object information is acquired actively, via sensor movements. Motor and sensory variables affect one another reciprocally, forming a closed-loop system. I therefore hypothesize that percepts signifying an object emerge when the motor-sensory loop’s dynamics converge towards a stable attractor. Using snout and whisker tracking data from freely-moving behaving rats, I outline such an attractor for object detection. I demonstrate that whisker-object contact elicits robust signals on a motor-sensory phase-plane, comprised of the derivatives of whisker base-angle and base-curvature. Over consecutive contact epochs, trajectories on the phase-plane converge to a specific area. The area is characterized by a basin of attraction during contact, more so than in free-air whisking. Differences in head-movement behavior are associated with proximity to the attractor, suggesting that the animal makes use of this proposed coding-scheme. Finally, to build upon these insights, I present a novel paradigm for the study of volitional perceptual exploration, in both rewarded and unrewarded contexts. It supports high-resolution study of motor-sensory development starting at birth, throughout task-learning and until mastery. Taken together, these results highlight a novel framework for the study of the perception of features and objects as motor-sensory attractors.

Smell and our unconscious sense of self

Lecture
Date:
Wednesday, May 10, 2023
Hour: 13:00 - 14:00
Location:
Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Prof. Benjamin D. Young
|
Institute for Neuroscience University of Nevada, Reno

Benjamin D. Young Ph.D. is an associate professor in philosophy and interdisciplinary neuroscience at the University of Nevada, Reno. Previously he held a Kreitman Post-Doctoral Fellowship in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at Ben-Gurion University, as well as Visiting Assistant Professorship and Post-Doctoral Fellowship in the Department of Cognitive Science at Hebrew University. He conducts empirically informed philosophical research with a particular emphasis on olfaction focusing on non-conceptual content, qualitative consciousness in the absence of awareness, and the perceptible objects of smell. His most recent projects include co-editing the textbook Mind, Cognition, and Neuroscience and the collection Theoretical Perspectives on Smell. Ben is finishing a book on smell tentatively titled Stinking Philosophy! and beginning to work on a book about the unconscious mind. Previously he showed how olfaction calls into question the general neuroscientific theories of consciousness and the relationship between access and phenomenal consciousness. Dr. Young’s current research extends this framework and examines the role that smell plays in allowing us to recognize our embodied material composition and what we can perceive about others from their smell both with and without subjective awareness. For more information about Ben’s research see https://www.unr.edu/philosophy/faculty-staff/benjamin-young

An Innate Immunity Pathway Against Invading Microbes Targets the Paternal Mitochondria for Destruction after Fertilization

Lecture
Date:
Wednesday, May 10, 2023
Hour: 10:00 - 11:15
Location:
Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Prof. Eli Arama
|
Dept of Molecular Genetics, WIS

Nature, nurture, and the neuroscience of parenthood

Lecture
Date:
Tuesday, May 2, 2023
Hour: 12:30 - 13:30
Location:
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
Prof. Bianca Jones Marlin
|
Zuckerman Institute Columbia University, New York

Introduction: Bianca Jones Marlin, Ph.D. is a neuroscientist and Herbert and Florence Irving Assistant Professor of Cell Research at the Zuckerman Institute at Columbia University in New York City. Her research investigates how organisms unlock innate behaviors at appropriate times, and how learned information is passed to subsequent generations via transgenerational epigenetic inheritance. Dr. Marlin combines neural imaging, behavior, and molecular genetics to uncover how learned behavior in the parent can become innate behavior in the offspring— work that promises to make a profound impact on societal brain health, mental well-being, and parenting. For more information about Dr. Marlin, visit www.biancajonesmarlin.com

Nature, nurture, and the neuroscience of parenthood

Lecture
Date:
Tuesday, May 2, 2023
Hour: 12:30 - 13:30
Location:
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
Prof. Bianca Jones Marlin
|
Zuckerman Institute Columbia University, New York

Introduction: Bianca Jones Marlin, Ph.D. is a neuroscientist and Herbert and Florence Irving Assistant Professor of Cell Research at the Zuckerman Institute at Columbia University in New York City. Her research investigates how organisms unlock innate behaviors at appropriate times, and how learned information is passed to subsequent generations via transgenerational epigenetic inheritance. Dr. Marlin combines neural imaging, behavior, and molecular genetics to uncover how learned behavior in the parent can become innate behavior in the offspring— work that promises to make a profound impact on societal brain health, mental well-being, and parenting. For more information about Dr. Marlin, visit www.biancajonesmarlin.com

Correlated light and electron microscopy reveal recurrent circuit motives in the zebrafish hindbrain visual integrator network

Lecture
Date:
Monday, April 17, 2023
Hour: 12:45 - 13:30
Location:
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
Prof. Armin Bahl
|
Department of Biology University of Konstanz, Germany

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Mini-Symposium-Windows into the Mind:New Approaches to Brain and Cognition

Conference
Date:
Tuesday, January 3, 2012
Hour:
Location:
Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

Homepage

Neurodegenerative diseases, stem cells and inflammation-new prospects for therapy

Conference
Date:
Thursday, December 1, 2011
Hour:
Location:
Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium

Metabolism and the Metabolic Disorder

Conference
Date:
Tuesday, October 25, 2011
Hour:
Location:
Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research

Homepage

The enigma of inflammation in A.L.S: What can be learned from other

Conference
Date:
Sunday, March 6, 2011
Hour:
Location:
Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium

Homepage

Measuring Behavior and Physiology: Bridging the Genotype Phenotype Gap

Conference
Date:
Thursday, March 3, 2011
Hour: 08:00 - 16:30
Location:
Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium

Homepage

Olfaction: from receptors to behavior

Conference
Date:
Thursday, February 10, 2011
Hour: 08:00 - 16:30
Location:
Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium

Homepage

A Conference on Neurodegenerative Diseases in Memory of Late Prof. Irith Ginzburg (1943-2008)

Conference
Date:
Wednesday, January 13, 2010
Hour:
Location:

Homepage

Second Nachmansohn Memorial Symposium: Molecular Approaches to the Nervous System

Conference
Date:
Wednesday, November 25, 2009
Hour:
Location:

Homepage

Minerva-Weizmann Workshop on Active Sensing in Touch Vision and Smell

Conference
Date:
Tuesday, December 2, 2008
Hour:
Location:

Homepage

Benoziyo Center for Neurological Diseases - Fourth Annual Symposium

Conference
Date:
Sunday, September 21, 2008
Hour:
Location:

Homepage

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