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  • Prof. Yardena Samuels

    Rotation: 1st,2nd,3rd

    Our lab combines genomic tools, systems biology tools, advanced somatic cell knockout and knock-in techniques and various comprehensive functional approaches to study melanoma genetic mutations. Our studies link basic biology, computational biology and clinical studies. Trainees will learn sophisticated technologies such as high-throughput sequencing, whole exome sequencing, somatic cell knockouts and expression and proteomic analyses. Training will also include interaction with other laboratories and core facilities, such as DNA microarray analysis, genomic analysis and cell sorting. Candidates who wish to join the group may contact me at: Yardena.samuels@weizmann.ac.il

  • Prof. Yardena Samuels

    Rotation: 2nd,3rd

    The rotation project involves computational prediction of neo-antigens presented by tumor cells to T-cells. The project integrates computational analyses of various large-scale data, including RNAseq, Whole-genome sequencing, and proteomics data.

  • Prof. Sima Lev

     

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a highly aggressive breast cancer subtype that currently has no effective targeted therapy. We have recently found that TNBCs are particular susceptible to ferroptotic cell death. Ferroptosis is a newly discovered cell death pathway driven by iron-dependent lipid peroxidation. We established multidisciplinary projects related to ferroptosis in TNBC, and are currently looking for a motivated and enthusiastic PhD student to join us.

  • Prof. Sima Lev

    Rotation: 3rd

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a highly aggressive disease that affects young women and currently has no effective treatment. The goal of our studies is to identify new therapeutic strategies for this particular subtype of breast cancer. We are trying to identify therapeutic targets and design rational combination therapies that will overcome drug resistance mechanisms. We use advance molecular cell biology approaches, high throughput screen and animal models.

  • Prof. Sima Lev

    Postdocs

    BRD4 (Bromodomain protein 4), a member of the BET (bromodomain and extra terminal domain) family, is an epigenetic reader that plays important roles in chromatin remodeling and transcriptional regulation. It is involved in cancer progression, metastasis and inflammatory diseases and is considered as promising therapeutic targets for different cancer subtypes, including TNBC. Targeting of BRD4 in TNBC and overcoming drug resistance are current questions that we address.

  • Prof. Sima Lev

    Postdocs

    Ferroptosis is a newly discovered cell death pathway driven by iron-dependent lipid peroxidation. We recently discovered new inducers of ferroptosis, and specific metabolic states that increase vulnerability to ferroptosis, and thus can be used for cancer therapy. We have multidisciplinary projects related to ferroptosis in TNBC, and we are currently looking for two talented and enthusiastic postdocs to join us.

  • Prof. Sima Lev

    Postdocs

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a highly aggressive disease that affects young women and currently has no effective treatment. The goal of our studies is to identify new therapeutic strategies for this particular subtype of breast cancer. Synthetic lethality is a powerful approach to selectively eliminate vulnerable cancer cells, and thus can be exploited for cancer therapy. Many studies including our own indicate that synthetic lethality screens could be a promising approach to identify novel drug targets for TNBC. A postdoctoral position is available to establish a genome-wide synthetic lethal screen to identify potent combination therapies for TNBC subtypes.

  • Prof. Valery Krizhanovsky

    We are looking for highly motivated post-doctoral fellow or research associate to an ERC funded project studying the "Biology of Ageing" at Weizmann Institute. The project is a collaboration of laboratories of Uri Alon, Tali Kimchi and Valery Krizhanovsky. It will combine cutting edge methods in molecular and cellular biology, behavioral neuroscience and system biology in mouse models. An expertise in behavioral neuroscience, molecular biology and mouse models is a plus.

  • Prof. Moshe Oren

    Rotation: 1st,2nd,3rd

    Specific research topics: Regulation of p53 activity in normal & cancer cells. Role of p53 in the cross-talk between cancer cells and their microenvironment. Tumor suppressor networks, with emphasis on the cross-talk between the p53 and Lats2 tumor suppressors. Regulation of nuclear import in cancer. microRNAs and cancer, with emphasis on p53 as a regulator and a target of miRNAs. Chromatin modifications and cancer, with emphasis on histone H2B ubiquitination as a new regulator of cancer-related processes and of stem cell biology. Inflammation and cancer, with emphasis on the cross-talk between p53 and NF-kB Involvement of p53 in the regulation of metabolic processes, including mitochondrial function, autophagy and oxidative stress-response.

  • Prof. Moshe Oren

    Msc
    Rotation:

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. One of the main complications of the disease is heterogeneity of the cell populations that comprise each tumor. This heterogeneity may lead to breast cancer aggressiveness and challenges in treatment, since different cell populations may respond differently to treatments and confound prognosis.

     

    By profiling single cells in a complex tumor population mix, single cell transcriptomics (scRNA-seq) imparts great advantages over traditional sequencing methods in dissecting heterogeneity in cell populations. Indeed, scRNA-seq studies have enabled the identification of distinct populations that correlate with poor prognosis and drug resistance. In contrast, bulk transcriptomic analyses can mask rare cell types that may be important in driving disease progression and/or metastases. Unfortunately, historically, the vast majority of patient samples has been analyzed in bulk.

     

    The Oren (cancer biology) and Eldar (signal processing and AI) labs are uniting their expertise to tackle this important challenge in the field. We propose to deconvolute bulk transcriptomic data into virtual single cell data by using signal processing ideas of optimization and deconvolution combined with model-based deep learning methods. Success in this task will harness vast amounts of existing patient-derived data and will be a highly important contribution to our understanding of breast cancer. It will also lead more generally to the combination of transcriptomic models and deep learning methods in solving various clinical and biological problems.

  • Prof. Gil Levkowitz

    Rotation: 1st,2nd,3rd

    Development and function of the zebrafish hypothalamus (see: http://www.weizmann.ac.il/mcb/GLevkowitz/research)

  • Prof. Valery Krizhanovsky

    Rotation: 1st,2nd,3rd

    The rotation projects aim to answer the following questions: How senescence contributes to normal embryonic development? What are the mechanisms regulating the interactions of senescent cells with their microenvironment? How presence of senescent cells is regulated in the organism?

  • Prof. Valery Krizhanovsky

    Senescent cells (SnCs) are cells that become damaged and stop dividing, secreting factors called senescence associated secreted profile (SASP). In young organisms, formation of SnCs is necessary in order to prevent cancer and repair wounds, keeping the tissue intact while the immune system removes the SnCs. However SnCs accumulate exponentially with age, becoming so abundant in old organisms that they cause chronic inflammation and slow regeneration to such an extent that they contribute to disease and death. We want to understand the timing of the accumulation of senescent cells and how it is regulated. If you are interested in ageing research and highly motivated to contribute to extension of health-span you are welcome to apply. We look for someone with strong background in mathematical and computational approaches who would be able to integrate data analysis into understanding of molecular and cellular mechanisms of ageing.

  • Prof. shalev itzkovitz

    Rotation: 1st,2nd,3rd

    Our lab studies how single cells cooperate in complex tissues to bring about physiological goals. A range of computational projects ranging from single molecules through single cells to the entire organism in health and disease are available. Matlab programming skills are essential.

  • Prof Dov Zipori

    Rotation: 1st, 2nd, 3rd

    Studies on stem cell differentiation, de-differentiation and tumorigenesis

  • Prof. Elior Peles

    Rotation: 1st, 2nd, 3rd

    Development of myelinated nerves

  • Prof. Elior Peles

    Rotation: 1st, 2nd, 3rd

    Development of myelinated nerves

  • Dr. Itay Tirosh

    Postdocs

    Our lab combines computational and experimental approaches to discover sub-populations of human tumor cells, study their biological functions and the therapeutic implications. For more details please see the lab website.

  • Dr. Itay Tirosh

    Rotation: 2nd, 3rd

    Our lab combines computational and experimental approaches to discover sub-populations of human tumor cells, study their biological functions and the therapeutic implications. For more details please see the lab website.

  • Dr. Yonatan Stelzer

    Rotation: 1st, 2nd, 3rd

    We are looking for curious, motivated and excellent individuals. Our lab utilizes state-of-the-art technologies to functionally dissect the roles of epigenetics during development and disease.

  • Prof. Oren Schuldiner

    Rotation: 1st, 2nd, 3rd

    Neuronal remodeling is an essential process used to sculpt the mature nervous system in vertebrates and invertebrates. One major mechanism is axon pruning in which neurons eliminate specific sections of their axons in a stereotypic manner. Not much is know about the molecular mechanisms that underlie this process. Defects in pruning may result in neurological conditions such as synesthesia or autism and the molecular mechanisms involved in axon pruning during development are also involved in axon fragmentation during neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and ALS. Therefore, uncovering the molecular mechanisms underlying axon pruning during development should increase our knowledge more broadly on axon fragmentation during development, disease and after injury. We are studying this process in the fly as it is an awesome genetic model organism with cutting edge techniques that enable us to mutate and visualize single neurons within a whole brain. We are looking for bright and enthusiastic rotation students to join and push forward one of our ongoing research projects. Looking forward to see you!