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Positions

Positions | Master's Rotation
Scientist Description

Prof. Gad Asher | Rotation: 1st, 2nd, 3rd

Phone:+972-8-934-6949

gad.asher@weizmann.ac.il

Homepage

<p>Biochemical identification of metabolic sensors</p>&#xD;

Prof. Gad Asher | Rotation: 1st, 2nd, 3rd

Phone:+972-8-934-6949

gad.asher@weizmann.ac.il

Homepage

<p>The interplay between circadian clocks and exercise performance</p>&#xD;

Prof. Gad Asher | Rotation: 1st, 2nd, 3rd

Phone:+972-8-934-6949

gad.asher@weizmann.ac.il

Homepage

<p>Computational analyses of rhythmic outputs (e.g. metabolites, gases)</p>&#xD;

Prof. Gad Asher | Rotation: 1st, 2nd, 3rd

Phone:+972-8-934-6949

gad.asher@weizmann.ac.il

Homepage

<p>The relationship between hypoxia and the core circadian clock</p>&#xD;

Prof. Rivka Dikstein | Rotation: 1st, 2nd, 3rd

Phone:+972-8-934-2117

rivka.dikstein@weizmann.ac.il

Homepage

<p>Regulation of gene expression at the transcriptional and translational levels is fundamental to all biological activities and is frequently altered in disease states. Our broad research interests are (i) to elucidate how the transcription and translation processes control the cellular response to enviromental stimuli; (ii) to reveal the connections between the transcription and translation processes and (iii) to develop tools to manipulate these processes for potential treatment of cancer, chronic inflammation and neurodegenrative diseases.</p>&#xD;

Dr. Nir Fluman | Rotation: 3rd

Phone:+972-8-934-6456

nir.fluman@weizmann.ac.il

Homepage

Membrane proteins make up a quarter of the proteome of every living organism and participate in nearly every biological process. We are interested in the fascinating process of how these proteins get produced, fold, and assemble in cells. The questions we address are: How do proteins fold in the membranes of living cells? How do the dynamic features of unfolded proteins assist in this process? How do cellular factors recognize membrane proteins that failed to fold and need to be cleared? The lab combines biochemical, cell biology, genetic and computational tools.

Prof. Neta Regev-Rudzki | Rotation: 2nd, 3rd

Phone:+972-8-934-3160

neta.regev-rudzki@weizmann.ac.il

Homepage

<p>We invite rotation students to join our research on malaria, host-pathogen interactions and/or extracellular vesicles (cell-cell communication system).&nbsp; Our research combines&nbsp;molecular biology and genetics (including CRISPR/Cas9), biochemistry, advanced imaging platforms and analysis and/or biophysics.</p>&#xD;
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<p>Anyone interested or having questions, please email&nbsp;Professor Neta Regev-Rudzki.</p>&#xD;
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<p><a href="mailto:neta.regev-rudzki@weizmann.ac.il">neta.regev-rudzki@weizmann.ac.il</a></p>&#xD;

Prof. Gideon Schreiber | Rotation: 1st, 2nd, 3rd

Phone:+972-8-934-3249

gideon.schreiber@weizmann.ac.il

Homepage

<p>Our research group is interested in investigating all aspects of protein-protein interactions, from their biophysical nature to their role in signaling within the cell. As our cellular model system we are investigating the multiple activities of type I interferons.&nbsp;</p>&#xD;

Prof. Gideon Schreiber | Rotation: 1st, 2nd, 3rd

Phone:+972-8-934-3249

gideon.schreiber@weizmann.ac.il

Homepage

<p>Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, we are actively investigating the evolution of the different variants, and how to make drugs that will combat them. We have published multiple papers in high impact journals on the subject</p>&#xD;

Prof. Michal Sharon | Rotation: 1st, 2nd, 3rd

Phone:+972-8-934-3947

michal.sharon@weizmann.ac.il

Homepage

<p>Studying large protein complexes involved in the protein degradation pathway using a novel mass spectrometry approach.</p>&#xD;

Prof. Michael Walker | Rotation: 1st,2nd,3rd

Phone:+972-8-934-3597

m.walker@weizmann.ac.il

Homepage

<p>In our research, we focus on the following aspects of beta cell function:</p>&#xD;
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<ol>&#xD;
<li>The transcriptional mechanisms underlying the normal embryonic development of beta cells and the functioning of mature beta cells</li>&#xD;
<li>Manipulating pancreatic cellular identity: molecular mechanisms controlling exocrine to endocrine cell reprogramming</li>&#xD;
<li>Dissecting the signaling mechanism that permit&nbsp; beta cells to respond to modulators of insulin secretion, in particular long chain and shor

Prof. David Wallach | Rotation: 1st, 2nd, 3rd

Phone:+972-8-934-3941

d.wallach@weizmann.ac.il

Homepage

<p>Transgenic and conditional-knockout mouse models are applied to gain better knowledge of the physiological and pathophysiological function of the following signaling proteins that were discovered in our laboratory: (a) Caspase-8, a cysteine protease that we have initially found to serve as the main proximal signaling protein in the initiation of death induction by the receptors (the extrinsic cell-death pathway), yet has more recently found also to serve various non-apoptotic roles.

Prof. David Wallach | Rotation: 1st, 2nd, 3rd

Phone:+972-8-934-3941

d.wallach@weizmann.ac.il

Homepage

<p>Caspase-8, a cysteine protease discovered in our laboratory, is the main proximal signaling enzyme in the activation of the extrinsic cell-death pathway by receptors of the TNF/NGF family. In certain cells it also participates in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation and survival. A number of different human tumors, including small cell lung carcinoma, neuroblastoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and others, are frequently deficient of caspase-8.