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Positions

Positions | PhD Students
Scientist Description

Prof. Gad Asher | 4 Years

Phone:+972-8-934-6949

gad.asher@weizmann.ac.il

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<p>Our lab has a longstanding interest in circadian clock resetting. We previously have identified and characterized novel resetting cues such as hypoxia and CO2. Recently, we have developed a new method to study resetting agents&nbsp;in vitro&nbsp;in an efficient and high-throughput manner, dubbed&nbsp;<a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-021-26210-1">Circa-SCOPE</a>. The method allows screening of multiple drugs in parallel to identify which affects the clock and how.

Prof. Gad Asher | 4 Years

Phone:+972-8-934-6949

gad.asher@weizmann.ac.il

Homepage

<p>We demonstrated that low-amplitude oxygen cycles, which mimic the daily physiological cycles in oxygen levels observed in rodents, can reset the clock in a HIF-1a-dependent manner (<a href="https://www.weizmann.ac.il/Biomolecular_Sciences/Asher/publications" style="color: rgb(30, 121, 159); text-transform: none; text-indent: 0px; letter-spacing: normal; font-family: &quot;Proxima Nova&quot;; font-size: 15px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 400; word-spacing: 0px; white-space: normal; orphans: 2; widows: 2; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: n

Prof. Gad Asher | 4 Years

Phone:+972-8-934-6949

gad.asher@weizmann.ac.il

Homepage

<p>Circadian clocks are key regulators of daily physiology and metabolism in mammals. Our understanding of the role of the circadian clock and specific clock proteins in controlling exercise capacity is rudimentary. Consequently, there is growing interest in exercise biology in general, specifically in its interaction with other processes that govern whole-body physiology and metabolism.

Prof. Rivka Dikstein | 5 Years

Phone:+972-8-934-2117

rivka.dikstein@weizmann.ac.il

Homepage

<p>Regulation of gene expression at the transcriptional and translational levels is fundamental to all biological activities and is frequently altered in disease states. Our broad research interests are (i) to elucidate how the transcription and translation processes control the cellular response to environmental stimuli; (ii) to reveal the connections between the transcription and translation processes and (iii) to develop tools to manipulate these processes for the potential treatment of cancer, chronic inflammation and neurodegenerative diseases.</p>&#xD;

Dr. Nir Fluman | 4.5 Years

Phone:+972-8-934-6456

nir.fluman@weizmann.ac.il

Homepage

Membrane proteins make up a quarter of the proteome of every living organism and participate in nearly every biological process. We are interested in the fascinating process of how these proteins get produced, fold, and assemble in cells. The questions we address are: How do proteins fold in the membranes of living cells? How do the dynamic features of unfolded proteins assist in this process? How do cellular factors recognize membrane proteins that failed to fold and need to be cleared? The lab combines biochemical, cell biology, genetic and computational tools.

Prof. Anthony H. Futerman | 4 Years

Phone:+972-8-934-2704

tony.futerman@weizmann.ac.il

Homepage

<p>See short description&nbsp;</p>&#xD;

Prof. Neta Regev-Rudzki | 4 Years

Phone:+972-8-934-3160

neta.regev-rudzki@weizmann.ac.il

Homepage

<p>Applicants with a research background at the intersection of molecular biology, biochemistry, imaging and/or biophysics are encouraged to apply. Experience in microbiology, molecular genetics (including CRISPR/Cas9), advanced imaging platforms (including image analysis) or advanced protein chemistry is advantageous.</p>&#xD;
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<p>This is a full-time position available from June 2022 for a period of 4 years with a possibility of a further extension subject to funding availability.</p>&#xD;
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<p>Candidate should send a cover letter and CV (includes a publication list) to Dr. Neta Regev-Rudzki.</p>&#xD;
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<p>For any informal inquiries please contact us by email at</p>&#xD;
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<p><a href="mailto:neta.regev-rudzki@weizmann.ac.il">neta.regev-rudzki@weizmann.ac.il</a></p>&#xD;

Prof. Eitan Reuveny | 5 Years

Phone:+972-8-934-3243

e.reuveny@weizmann.ac.il

Homepage

<p>G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest gene family in the human genome. Their role is to translate chemical information into cellular responses, like olfactory processing, neuronal activity modulation, and hormone actions or regulating blood pressure among many. Their cellular effectors can range from various enzymes to ion channels. Interestingly, nature has designed the GPCR as a major target for many natural compounds and the pharmaceutical industry has focused its attention on designing various agonists and antagonists to treat various illnesses.

Prof. Michal Sharon | 4 Years

Phone:+972-8-934-3947

michal.sharon@weizmann.ac.il

Homepage

<p>Developing novel structural mass spectrometry methods</p>&#xD;

Prof. Michal Sharon | 4 Years

Phone:+972-8-934-3947

michal.sharon@weizmann.ac.il

Homepage

<p>Discovering the mechanisms that control and coordinate the activity of molecular machines involved in the protein degradation pathway by combining native mass spectrometry and cell biology approaches&nbsp;</p>&#xD;