Structural Mass Spectrometry
Prof. Michal Sharon

Prof. Michal Sharon

Phone: +972-8-934-3947

Email: michal.sharon@weizmann.ac.il

Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences, Room 157

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For Structural Mass Spectrometry

We aim to discover the mechanisms that control and coordinate the activity of molecular machines involved in the protein degradation pathway. To do so we apply novel native mass spectrometry approaches, in conjunction with fluorescence microscopy, biochemical and cell biology methods - generating an integrative mode of analysis combining in vitro and in vivo findings.

Chromosome Catastrophes in Cancer
Dr. Ofer Shoshani

Dr. Ofer Shoshani

Phone: +972-8-934-2443

Email: ofer.shoshani@weizmann.ac.il

Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences, Room 207, 217-219

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We focus on studying the mechanisms that promote chromosome instability, a major driver of cancer initiation, metastasis, and drug resistance. Our group aims to understand the plasticity of the cancer genome and how it contributes to disease progression. To do so, we apply chromosome manipulation approaches in cells, to study how single genomic perturbations affect population trajectories. Our goal is to identify vulnerabilities in mechanisms driving chromosome evolution, in order to design next-generation therapies with reduced resistance in patients.

Functional reprogramming in the tumor microenvironment
Dr. Ruth Scherz-Shouval

Prof. Ruth Scherz-Shouval

Phone: +972-8-934-2299

Email: ruth.shouval@weizmann.ac.il

Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences, Room 275

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 For functional reprogramming in the tumor microenvironment

For tumors to expand, metastasize, and evade immune surveillance, genetically transformed cancer cells must recruit non-malignant cells, including macrophages, fibroblasts and endothelial cells. These cells, collectively termed the tumor microenvironment, are reprogrammed to support the tumor at the expense of its host. Our group aims to elucidate the mechanisms by which tumors reprogram their local environments. Our goal is to provide a deeper understanding of how tumors develop into systemic malignancies, predict which tumors are more likely to do so, and design therapeutic strategies to overcome these malignancies by targeting genetically stable elements in the tumor microenvironment.

Mechanisms of Neuronal Wiring
Prof. Avraham Yaron

Prof. Avraham Yaron

Phone: +972-8-934-6240

Email: avraham.yaron@weizmann.ac.il

Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences, Room 417

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We are investigating the mechanisms that govern the wiring of the nervous system during development, which includes axonal guidance, pruning and the role of local protein synthesis.

Looking for
a research lab
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The department of Biomolecular Sciences proudly presents an interactive movie that will help you decide which lab you would like to join for your research work. Press on the questions that interest you to begin your journey. You can always go back or and choose another path or start over.

Navigation buttons are on the bottom and you can step back using the arrow on the upper left corner.

 

How can cells measure themselves?
Prof. Michael Fainzilber

Prof. Mike Fainzilber

Phone: +972-8-934-4266

Fax: +972-8-934-4112

Email: mike.fainzilber@weizmann.ac.il

Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences, Room 405

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We are investigating long distance signaling mechanisms in neurons and other large eukaryotic cells, primarily an importins/molecular motor-based mechanism that integrates cytoplasmic and nuclear signaling. Currently our main focus is on the roles of this and related mechanisms in neuronal responses to injury and in cellular length sensing.

Decoding gene regulatory commands
Prof. Rivka Dikstein

Prof. Rivka Dikstein

Phone: +972-8-934-2117

Email: rivka.dikstein@weizmann.ac.il

Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences, Room 329

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We are studying regulation of transcription and translation in health and disease. Specifically we elucidate how the transcription and translation processes control the cellular response to enviromental stimuli, we investigate the connections between the transcription and translation processes and we develop pharmacological tools to manipulate these processes.

Computational Design of New Protein Functions
Dr. Sarel-Jacob Fleishman
Fleishman Sarel-Jacob

Prof. Sarel-Jacob Fleishman

Phone: +972-8-934-6361

Email: sarel.fleishman@weizmann.ac.il

Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences, Room 177

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Dr. Sarel-Jacob Fleishman

We are interested in how protein function is encoded in the structures of protein binders, enzymes, and antibodies. To test our understanding we computationally design new protein functions not seen in Nature and experimentally characterize these designs. Iterations of design and experimental characterization enable us to understand new features of how protein function is specified in Nature.

Circadian Rhythms in Health & Disease
Dr. Gad Asher

Prof. Gad Asher

Phone: +972-8-934-6949

Fax: +972-8-934-6010

Email: gad.asher@weizmann.ac.il

Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences, Room 277

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Our main research interest is to explore the interplay between the cellular metabolic state and circadian clocks and further identify the underlying molecular mechanisms.

Ion channels and cellular physiology
Prof. Eitan Reuveny

Prof. Eitan Reuveny

Phone: +972-8-934-3243

Fax: +972-8-934-2135

Email: e.reuveny@weizmann.ac.il

Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences, Room 356

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We are interested in deciphering the mechanisms by which extracellular and intracellular signaling queues affect ion channel function, both in excitable and non-excitable tissues. We focus on three main areas: 1) GPCRs-mediated ion channel regulation and modulation, 2) cellular mechanisms that control calcium homeostasis, 3) how physiological functions are affected by ions channels activity.

DNA damage repair, genetic stability & cancer
Prof. Zvi Livneh

Prof. Zvi Livneh

Phone: +972-8-934-3203

Fax: +972-8-934-4169

Email: zvi.livneh@weizmann.ac.il

Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences, Room 307

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We are studying molecular mechanisms of DNA repair, and in particular error-prone repair (translesion DNA synthesis) in mammalian cells. In addition, we employ the knowledge on DNA repair to develop novel functional enzymatic DNA repair biomarkers for risk assessment and prevention of cancer.

Survivability and variability in photosynthesis: From machines to communities
Prof. Ziv Reich
Reich Ziv

Prof. Ziv Reich

Phone: +972-8-934-2982

Email: ziv.reich@weizmann.ac.il

Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences, Room 259

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We are interested in transport processes and in photosynthesis. Within the realm of photosynthesis we are mainly concerned with dynamic processes that accompany the life cycle of the thylakoid network, including its response to different stresses and its formation and dismantling. Regarding nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, we are particularly interested in its selectivity, the behavior of the ensemble of transporting molecules as it relates to the transport of a single molecule and in applications to gene therapy. In both fields of study, we combine different approaches and methodologies including ensemble and single-molecule biophysical methods, biochemical and molecular biology techniques, statistical mechanical modeling and state-of-the-art electron microscopy.

The architecture of cell membranes
Dr. Ori Avinoam

Dr. Ori Avinoam

Phone: +972-8-934-3557

Email: ori.avinoam@weizmann.ac.il

Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences, Room 374

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The architecture of cell membranes

We are interested in the universal process of membrane remodeling that occurs during endocytosis, when subdomains of the membrane are reshaped into cargo transport vesicles, which allow cells to take up material and communicate with the environment. Our studies focus on understanding the molecular mechanisms of endocytosis and their contribution to cell physiology. We use a combination of advanced imaging techniques that include correlated light and electron microscopy to visualize these processes with high spatial and temporal resolution. We are particularly interested in understanding how endocytic processes contribute to muscle differentiation and homeostasis.

Human diseases involving sphingolipids
Prof. Anthony H. Futerman

Prof. Anthony H. Futerman

Phone: +972-8-934-2704

Fax: +972-8-934-4112

Email: tony.futerman@weizmann.ac.il

Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences, Room 456

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Protein Interactions in vitro and in vivo
Prof. Gideon Schreiber
Schreiber Gideon

Prof. Gideon Schreiber

Phone: +972-8-934-3249

Email: gideon.schreiber@weizmann.ac.il

Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences, Room 475

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We study the basic physico-chemical principles governing the kinetics, thermodynamics and specificity of protein-protein interactions. The gained knowledge is translated into the development and implementation of protein engineering methodologies. Between other, these are used to study how the interaction of interferon with its receptors results in complex differential responses in cells.

Malaria parasite biological aspects
Dr. Neta Regev-Rudzki

Prof. Neta Regev-Rudzki

Phone: +972-8-934-3160

Email: neta.regev-rudzki@weizmann.ac.il

Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences, Room 205

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With malaria continuing to be a major global disease, advances toward understanding the basic biology of P. falciparum remain essential. Our studies focus on different aspects of the cellular biology of the malaria parasite. In particular, we aim to explore cell-cell communication pathways between the parasites themselves and their human host.

Autophagy in health and disease
Prof. Zvulun Elazar

Prof. Zvulun Elazar

Phone: +972-8-934-3682

Email: zvulun.elazar@weizmann.ac.il

Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences, Room 429

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We study the molecular mechanism and regulation of autophagy, a process responsible for the degradation of cytoplasmic proteins and organelles. A particular emphasis is given to the relationship of this catabolic pathway to disease such as cancer and neurodegeneration.

Prof. Yoav Soen

Prof. Yoav Soen

Phone: +972-8-934-6011

Email: yoavs@weizmann.ac.il

Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences, Room 229

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Prof. Yoav Soen

We study epigenetic mechanisms by which developmental plasticity allows the environment to bring about heritable modifications in the developmental program. We approach this with a combination of in vitro (mammalian cells) and in vivo models (the fly, D. melanogaster), in which we confront developmental processes with unforeseen environmental challenges that promote deviations from the selected patterns of development.

Protein folding and misfolding in the membrane
Dr. Nir Fluman

Dr. Nir Fluman

Phone: +972-8-934-6456

Email: nir.fluman@weizmann.ac.il

Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences, Room 305

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Proteins mediate nearly all of the essential molecular processes of life. To perform their function, they need to fold into unique structures. At any given moment, thousands of proteins are produced and need to fold in the cell. But folding is an incredibly complex process that very often fails. To deal with this challenge, the cell is equipped with an array of chaperones and proteases, performing quality control functions to safeguard the cell. Failure of these processes underlies numerous devastating diseases. We investigate how these events unfold for membrane proteins, which are proteins that reside at the membrane and make up a quarter of the proteome in every living organism.

Ironing Out the Mysteries of Mitochondrial Health
Dr. Tslil Ast

Dr. Tslil Ast

Phone: +972-8-934-6226

Email: tslil.ast@weizmann.ac.il

Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences, Room 473

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Mitochondria are pivotal to the function of eukaryotic cells- WHY? It’s becoming clear that one of their most fundamental and vital roles involves the biosynthesis of iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters. These ancient cofactors are crucial for proteins engaged in DNA replication, translation, metabolism, and cellular respiration and more. Given these critical functions, it is not surprising that disruptions in Fe-S cluster synthesis are associated with various human diseases, including the most prevalent mitochondrial disorder (Friedreich’s ataxia). Despite its importance, much remains unknown about this pathway, particularly how it is regulated within the cell. Our lab utilizes cutting-edge genetic, cell biology, and biochemical techniques to unravel this vital pathway and integrate it within the broader context of human cellular function.

Decoding gene regulatory commands
Prof. Rivka Dikstein

Prof. Rivka Dikstein

Phone: +972-8-934-2117

Email: rivka.dikstein@weizmann.ac.il

Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences, Room 329

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We are studying regulation of transcription and translation in health and disease. Specifically we elucidate how the transcription and translation processes control the cellular response to enviromental stimuli, we investigate the connections between the transcription and translation processes and we develop pharmacological tools to manipulate these processes.

Chromosome Catastrophes in Cancer
Dr. Ofer Shoshani

Dr. Ofer Shoshani

Phone: +972-8-934-2443

Email: ofer.shoshani@weizmann.ac.il

Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences, Room 207, 217-219

Go to Website

We focus on studying the mechanisms that promote chromosome instability, a major driver of cancer initiation, metastasis, and drug resistance. Our group aims to understand the plasticity of the cancer genome and how it contributes to disease progression. To do so, we apply chromosome manipulation approaches in cells, to study how single genomic perturbations affect population trajectories. Our goal is to identify vulnerabilities in mechanisms driving chromosome evolution, in order to design next-generation therapies with reduced resistance in patients.

Looking for
a research lab
to join?

Looking for a research lab to join?

The department of Biomolecular Sciences proudly presents an interactive movie that will help you decide which lab you would like to join for your research work. Press on the questions that interest you to begin your journey. You can always go back or and choose another path or start over.

Navigation buttons are on the bottom and you can step back using the arrow on the upper left corner.

 

Computational Design of New Protein Functions
Dr. Sarel-Jacob Fleishman
Fleishman Sarel-Jacob

Prof. Sarel-Jacob Fleishman

Phone: +972-8-934-6361

Email: sarel.fleishman@weizmann.ac.il

Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences, Room 177

Go to Website

Dr. Sarel-Jacob Fleishman

We are interested in how protein function is encoded in the structures of protein binders, enzymes, and antibodies. To test our understanding we computationally design new protein functions not seen in Nature and experimentally characterize these designs. Iterations of design and experimental characterization enable us to understand new features of how protein function is specified in Nature.

Functional reprogramming in the tumor microenvironment
Dr. Ruth Scherz-Shouval

Prof. Ruth Scherz-Shouval

Phone: +972-8-934-2299

Email: ruth.shouval@weizmann.ac.il

Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences, Room 275

Go to Website

 For functional reprogramming in the tumor microenvironment

For tumors to expand, metastasize, and evade immune surveillance, genetically transformed cancer cells must recruit non-malignant cells, including macrophages, fibroblasts and endothelial cells. These cells, collectively termed the tumor microenvironment, are reprogrammed to support the tumor at the expense of its host. Our group aims to elucidate the mechanisms by which tumors reprogram their local environments. Our goal is to provide a deeper understanding of how tumors develop into systemic malignancies, predict which tumors are more likely to do so, and design therapeutic strategies to overcome these malignancies by targeting genetically stable elements in the tumor microenvironment.

Malaria parasite biological aspects
Dr. Neta Regev-Rudzki

Prof. Neta Regev-Rudzki

Phone: +972-8-934-3160

Email: neta.regev-rudzki@weizmann.ac.il

Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences, Room 205

Go to Website

With malaria continuing to be a major global disease, advances toward understanding the basic biology of P. falciparum remain essential. Our studies focus on different aspects of the cellular biology of the malaria parasite. In particular, we aim to explore cell-cell communication pathways between the parasites themselves and their human host.

Survivability and variability in photosynthesis: From machines to communities
Prof. Ziv Reich
Reich Ziv

Prof. Ziv Reich

Phone: +972-8-934-2982

Email: ziv.reich@weizmann.ac.il

Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences, Room 259

Go to Website

We are interested in transport processes and in photosynthesis. Within the realm of photosynthesis we are mainly concerned with dynamic processes that accompany the life cycle of the thylakoid network, including its response to different stresses and its formation and dismantling. Regarding nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, we are particularly interested in its selectivity, the behavior of the ensemble of transporting molecules as it relates to the transport of a single molecule and in applications to gene therapy. In both fields of study, we combine different approaches and methodologies including ensemble and single-molecule biophysical methods, biochemical and molecular biology techniques, statistical mechanical modeling and state-of-the-art electron microscopy.