MSc Study Requirements

Physical Sciences

Acceptance to the MSc/direct route to the PhD Program

Admission to the program is based on the combination of the following factors

  1. Your grades in the BSc courses. Special attention is given to the grades in the key subjects such as Analytical Mechanics (at least one semester of studies), Electrodynamics (at least one semester), Statistical Physics (at least one but preferably two semesters) and Quantum Mechanics (at least two semesters).
  2. Recommendation letters.
  3. Details of your physics related background (publications, participation in various science programs, physics or mathematics olympiads, etc)
  4. Results of the interview with the Board of Studies committee. When invited to such an interview you will receive a letter explaining what is expected and how to get prepared to it.
  5. If you have a degree from a non-Israeli university then results of the GRE Physics examination could be useful but not mandatory.

Please declare in advance whether you wish to study in Physics, Biological Physics or Applied Physics area. Please note that you may later change your mind and transfer from one area to the other as long as you complete the required courses (see below) and receive the approval of the Chair of the Board of Studies.

Required Credit Points

You are required to accumulate 36 credit points in the course configuration depending on the area you choose to study as indicated below. At least 24 credit points must be accumulated within the first year. Any change needs to be approved ahead of time by the Chair of the Board of Studies. Here are the course configurations of different study areas.

 

Physics

Obligatory Courses

During the first semester of the first year you must take the following three obligatory courses:

  • Quantum Mechanics I
  • Quantum Mechanics II
  • Statistical Physics

In addition:

  • Experimental Physics Laboratory course (1st year).
  • Student Seminar (2nd year)

Elective Courses

The rest of the credit points must be accumulated from courses offered in the Physics Sciences program. You may consider taking one course offered by other WIS programs (say, Mathematics) provided the Chair of the Board of Studies approves it ahead of time.

 

Applied Physics

Obligatory Courses

During the first semester of the first year, you must take the following two obligatory courses:

  • Quantum Mechanics I
  • Statistical Physics

In addition:

  • Experimental Physics Laboratory course (1st year)
  • Student Seminar (2nd year)

Elective Courses

The rest of the credit points must be accumulated from courses offered in the Physics Sciences program. You may consider taking one or two course offered by other WIS programs (say, Mathematics) provided the Chair of the Board of Studies approves them ahead of time.

 

Biological Physics

Obligatory Courses

During the first year, you must take the following four obligatory courses:

  • Quantum Mechanics I; must be taken during the first semester
  • Statistical Physics; must be taken during the first semester
  • Introductory course in Biology
  • Solid State I, or, Condensed Soft Matter I

In addition:

  • Physics Laboratory (1st year) called "experimental projects"
  • Student Seminar (2nd year)

Elective Courses

In addition, you must take the following courses:

  • At least two additional courses in Physics
  • At least three additional Courses in Biology, regarding which you must consult the Chair of the Board of Studies
  • One elective course, to be determined after consulting the Chair of the Board of Studies

Rotations

Two rotations in research groups at the WIS.

 

Chemical Sciences

Required Credit Points

You are required to accumulate 24 credit points. At least 16 credit points must be accumulated within the first year.

Credit points must be accumulated from courses offered in the Chemistry Programs (including courses that are listed as shared with other fields of studies). Any change needs to be approved ahead of time by the Chair of the Board of Studies.

 

Required Courses

  • Core Courses:
    During your MSc studies (i.e. within 4 semesters), you are required to take at least three Core Courses offered by the Board of Studies each year.
  • Research Presentations:
    First year students must take a course called Research Presentations (0.5 credit point).
  • Public Presentation:
    You will be required to present your MSc thesis in front of an audience, either immediately before or after your MSc exam. Students will be awarded 0.5 credit point for this public presentation.

 

Chemistry Core courses list for the 2017/2018 Academic year:

Semester 1

  • Angular Momentum and Symmetry in Molecular Spectroscopy
  • Group Theory and Chemical Reactivity
  • Clouds and Aerosols
  • Stable isotopic geochemistry
  • Soft Matter: Interactions, structure and dynamics
  • Protein Structure and Function 1
  • Quantum Mechanics 1
  • Complex analysis and partial differential equations
  • NMR Primer
  • Differential Equations for Chemists
  • Chemistry of Elements

 

Semester 2

  • Optical properties of materials
  • Topics in Physical Chemistry and Biophysics
  • Nucleic acids Structure & Function
  • Topics in Physical Chemistry and Biophysics
  • Quantum Molecular Dynamics: An Introduction to Molecular Physics
  • Biological Materials Mechanics - Introductory Concepts
  • Environmental Geochemistry

 

Rotations

As an MSc student in the Chemical Sciences (General Chemistry), you must do three rotations in three different Research Groups. Not more than two rotations in the same department. Exemptions must be approved by the Board of Studies.

 

Areas of Research

Biological Physics and Soft Matter | Earth & Planetary Sciences | Materials & Bio-materials | Nano Sciences | Organic Chemistry | Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics | Structural and Molecular Biology |

 

For more information

please visit the Faculty of Chemistry website and the Chemistry Program Facebook.
 

Biology

Biology, the study of life and living organisms, is a broad and rapidly-evolving topic. Studies in recent years have given us the ability to understand the very basic processes that underlie life from the levels of the intact organism, through cells and down to the molecular and sub-molecular levels. Understanding these processes requires knowledge, tools and skills from the various fields of biology, medicine, pharmacology, bioinformatics, chemistry, physics, mathematics, and related fields. The Weizmann Institute of Science has several dozen research groups that utilize these and other approaches to understand the basis of life as we know it, combining diverse and inter-disciplinary research with the excellent infrastructure available in our campus.

 

About the Program

Applicants to the program are interviewed by a committee comprised of three faculty members in the Life Sciences. Note: Outstanding students in the MSc program have the opportunity to continue to the Direct PhD track.

 

Required Credit Points

You are required to accumulate 24 credit points during the two years of the program. At least 16 credit points (but no more than 20 points) must be accumulated within the first year.

Your credit points can include the following:

  • Up to 3 credit points from laboratory courses
  • Up to 4 credit points from seminar courses
  • Up to 0.5 (one half) credit point from lectures and presentations given in conferences

You may transfer up to two surplus credit points from your MSc studies at the Feinberg Graduate School to your PhD studies. This applies if you continued directly to PhD studies or if you took a break of no more than one year between your MSc and PhD studies.

Note: Any deviation from these requirements must be approved in advance by the Board of Studies.

 

Required Coursework

In your first year of studies, you must take the following courses:

  • Three core courses (7.5 credit points)
  • Elective courses (6.5 credit points)
  • Introduction to Statistics for Life Sciences (3 credit points)


In your second year of studies, you must take the following courses:

  • Two core courses (5 credit points)
  • One obligatory course called Scientific Writing (0 credit points)
  • Elective courses (2 credit points)


The following is a list of core courses offered in 2017-2018:

  • The RNA world
  • Chemistry of life
  • Protein Structure and Function 1
  • Developmental Genetics
  • Cancer: Genome, Micro-environment and Immunology
  • Introduction to Neuroscience: Cellular and Synaptic Physiology
  • Introduction to Neuroscience: Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Cell Biology and Pathology of the Neuron
  • Transcriptional Control of Gene Expression

 
Note: If a core course awards more than 2.5 points, the balance of points (above 2.5 points) counts as credit from elective courses.

 

Rotations

As an MSc student in the Life Sciences (Biology), you must do three rotations in three different Research Groups, but not more than two rotations in the same department. Previous work or summer programs are not considered to be rotations.

 

Safety Course

All MSc students in Biology are required to take an obligatory safety course. You do not receive credit points for this course.

 

Ethics Course

All MSc students in Biology are required to take an obligatory ethics course. You do not receive credit points for this course.

 

Elective Courses

Most elective courses are offered once every two years. As a student in the Biology program, you may only take courses defined online as open to Life Science/Biology students. You can tell if a course is defined as open to Life Science/Biology students if the course description lists the number of credit points for the Life Science/Biology track.

All other courses require approval in advance from the Board of Studies for the Life Sciences. Without such approval, credit points will not be awarded for these courses.

 

Course in Scientific Writing

As an MSc student in the Life Sciences, you are required to take a Scientific Writing course in your second year. The Feinberg Graduate School randomly assigns second-year MSc students to either the first semester or second semester course, and no registration is needed. If you are assigned the course for one semester but would like to move over to the other semester, find a student who is willing to switch with you and notify the Feinberg Graduate School of the change.

These two courses are opened only to second-year MSc students. They are closed to all other students. A third course, designed specifically for PhD students, is also available and is exclusively for PhD students who did not take a Scientific Writing course at the Weizmann Institute during their MSc or PhD studies.

 

Credit Points for External Courses

If you are interested in taking external courses, apply in advance to the Board of Studies and ask the Board to consider awarding you credit points for the courses you want to take. You can contact the Board by sending an email to the FGS Coordinator of Courses. The application should be made in advance and include all relevant information including the institution, lecturer, number of weekly hours, course syllabus and mode of grading.

Approval for an external course and the number of credit points awarded are at the discretion of the Board of Studies, and may differ from the credit awarded by the host institution. In principle, external courses are not awarded credit if they are entirely passive and do not include an exam or student presentation.

Information about Courses offered by the Interuniversity Institute for marine Sciences in Eilat in 2018

List of approved ocurses for FGS MSc students in 2017
The courses are conducted in Hebrew.

Approved courses at the Faculty of Agriculture (Hebrew University)
The courses are conducted in Hebrew.
 

Please note: You may accumulate only up to 5 credit points from external courses.
 

Credit points for external lectures and presentations at conferences

If you present your research orally at a scientific conference, you may ask the Board to consider awarding you half  credit point for your presentation. You can contact the Board by sending an email to the FGS Coordinator of Courses. You are entitled to receive up to  a maximum of ONE HALF (0.5) of a credit point, in total, for the entire period of your MSc studies.

The following are pre-conditions for approval of credit points in this category:

  • You must give an oral lecture, not a poster presentation.
  • It must be presented at a meeting that is open to all; it cannot be a closed consortium.
  • It must be given within twelve months of submitting your request to the Board.
  • The meeting can take place in Israel or abroad.
  • You provide a letter of invitation to speak or a copy of the program with the presentation listed in it.
  • You must submit your request after the talk has taken place.

 

Registration, Attendance and Dropping Out of a Course

The Biology program offers three types of courses: Lecture courses, seminar courses and laboratory courses. All courses require pre-registration online. Regarding attendance and the option of dropping out of a course:
For Lecture Courses: Unless specified otherwise by the instructors, attendance in lecture courses is not obligatory. You may drop out of a lecture course, assuming it is not obligatory, at any time.

For Seminar and Laboratory Courses: Attendance in all meetings of a seminar or a laboratory course is obligatory. You may not withdraw from a seminar or laboratory course after it has started. However, before a course starts, you may choose to cancel your participation provided that you notify the Feinberg Graduate School of your decision. This allows another student on stand-by to attend the course and ensures the participation of a minimum number of students (required for the course to open).

 

Areas of Research

Molecular Cell Biology

Structure, function and regulation of cellular mechanisms | mechanisms of intracellular communication |

Molecular Genetics

Developmental biology | differentiation and apoptosis |

Biochemistry/Biophysics

Roles of proteins in signaling | trafficking | maintenance of DNA integrity and gene expression I

Immunology

Cellular and humoral responses, autoimmune processes, transplantation, hematopoiesis, tumor immunology |

Neurobiology

Brain research, the links between brain and behavior, regeneration of neural systems |

Plant Sciences

Plant studies in the genome era, development, responses to the environment |

Biological Regulation

Growth and fertility | regulation of normal and malignant processes |

Bioinformatics

Understanding the genome and its implications on gene expression systems | Multi-disciplinary studies in the Life Sciences and the Exact Sciences | Combining practical work and theoretical analysis in various biological systems |

 

Brain Sciences (Systems, Computational & Cognitive Neuroscience)

The brain is the most complex known entity in the universe. It underlies everything that is human, including sensations, movements, emotions, memories, learning, language, planning, imagination and consciousness. As such, brain research involves a uniquely diverse set of disciplines, including Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science, Psychology, Engineering, and Biology.


Curriculum

  • First year
    Intensive course program (at least 16 credit points) and three rotations.
     
  • Second year
    Completion of 24 credit points overall, and commencement of research work in hosting lab. Continuation of the Ph.D. track depends on successful candidacy exam and defense of Ph.D. proposal, and on GPA ≥85.

 

  • Years 3 - 5.5
    Completion of the Ph.D. research project and acquisition of additional 6 credit points, totaling 30 points as required in the direct Ph.D. track.

Required Coursework

During the first year of studies you must take the following courses:

  • Three core courses: Two Introduction to Neuroscience courses, plus one other core course (7.5 credit points)
  • One obligatory course called: Methods in Neuroscience (1 credit point)
  • Introduction to Statistics for Life Sciences (3 credit points)
  • Elective course (4.5 credit points)


During your second year of studies, you must take the following courses:

  • Two core courses, at least one of them from the Introduction to Neuroscience Courses (5 credit points)
  • One obligatory Scientific Writing course (0 credit points)
  • Elective courses (3 credit points)

 

Beyond the above mentioned courses, each student is required for complementary courses from the list below.  The complementary courses are determined by the director of the program for each student according to his/her specific background (e.g., students with no background in Biology are required to take the course "An overview of molecular biology”; students with no background in Math will either take the "Mathematics for biologists” or the "Differential equations for Chemists”). 
 

  • Introduction to Matlab and data analysis
  • Mathematics for biologists  or  Differential equations for Chemists
  • An overview of molecular biology – adapted for young in biology
  • Neuroanatomy  and  Neuroanatomy lab

 

Core Courses

Overall during the first two years, you must take at least three out of the following Introduction to Neuroscience Core courses. Please note that most of these courses are offered once every two years

  • Introduction to Neuroscience: Cellular and Synaptic Physiology
  • Introduction to Neuroscience: Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Introduction to Neuroscience: Molecular Neuroscience - Genes To Behavior
  • Introduction to Neuroscience: Systems Neuroscience


The remaining two core courses (to a total of five core courses) can be:

  • From the core courses of the Molecular & Cellular Neuroscience track
  • From the Biology core courses
  • Statistical Physics
  • Theoretical Neuroscience
  • Each year another course (from Physics/Math/CS) will be defined as a core-course, notification will come directly to the students each year.


Note:
If a core course awards more than 2.5 points, the balance of points (above 2.5 points) counts as credit from elective courses.
 

Your credit points in the first two years can include the following:

  • Up to 3 credit points from laboratory courses
  • Up to 4 credit points from seminar courses
  • Up to 0.5 (one half) credit point from lectures and presentations given in conferences
     

Note
Any deviation from these requirements must be approved in advance by the Board of Studies. Credit points can be taken from programs outside of the Life Sciences program but requires prior approval of the Board of Studies.


Rotations

All three rotations must be done in one of the research groups listed in this link. A rotation in other laboratories in Life Sciences and other faculties might be considered on an individual basis. Previous work or summer programs are not considered to be rotations.

 

Safety Course

All students are required to take an obligatory safety course. You do not receive credit points for this course.

 

Ethics Course

All students are required to take an obligatory ethics course. You do not receive credit points for this course.

 

Elective Courses

Most elective courses are offered once every two years. As a student in the Brain Sciences program, you may only take courses defined online as open to Life Science/Brain Sciences: Systems, Computational & Cognitive Neuroscience students. You can tell if a course is defined as open to the students in the program if the course description lists the number of credit points for the Life Sciences/Brain Sciences: Systems, Computational and Cognitive Neuroscience track.

For all other courses (Physics/Math/CS/Chemistry) please ask  approval in advance from the head of the brain-sciences program. Without such approval, credit points will not be awarded for these courses.

 

Course in Scientific Writing

All students in the Life Sciences are required to take a Scientific Writing course in their second year. The Feinberg Graduate School randomly assigns second-year students to either the first semester or second semester course, and no registration is needed. If you are assigned to the course for one semester but would like to move over to the other semester, find a student who is willing to switch with you and notify the Feinberg Graduate School of the change.

 

Credit Points for External Courses

If you are interested in taking external courses, apply in advance to the Board of Studies and ask the Board to consider awarding you credit points for the courses you want to take. You can contact the Board by sending an email to the FGS Coordinator of Courses. The application should be made in advance and include all relevant information including the institution, lecturer, number of weekly hours, course syllabus and mode of grading.

 

Approval for an external course and the number of credit points awarded are at the discretion of the Board of Studies, and may differ from the credit awarded by the host institution. In principle, external courses are not awarded credit if they are entirely passive and do not include an exam or student presentation.

Please note: You may accumulate only up to 5 credit points from external courses.

 

Credit points for external lectures and presentations at conferences

If you present your research orally at a scientific conference, you may ask the Board to consider awarding you half  credit point for your presentation. You can contact the Board by sending an email to the FGS Coordinator of Courses. You are entitled to receive up to  a maximum of ONE HALF (0.5) of a credit point, in total, for the entire period of your MSc studies.

The following are pre-conditions for approval of credit points in this category:

  • You must give an oral lecture, not a poster presentation.
  • It must be presented at a meeting that is open to all; it cannot be a closed consortium.
  • It must be given within twelve months of submitting your request to the Board.
  • The meeting can take place in Israel or abroad.
  • You provide a letter of invitation to speak or a copy of the program with the presentation listed in it.
  • You must submit your request after the talk has taken place.

 

Registration, attendance and dropping out of a course

The Brain Science program offers three types of courses: Lecture courses, seminar courses and laboratory courses. All courses require pre-registration online. Regarding attendance and the option of dropping out of a course:
For Lecture Courses: Unless specified otherwise by the instructors, attendance in lecture courses is not obligatory. You may drop out of a lecture course, assuming it is not obligatory, at any time.

For Seminar and Laboratory Courses: Attendance in all meetings of a seminar or a laboratory course is obligatory. You may not withdraw from a seminar or laboratory course after it has started. However, before a course starts, you may choose to cancel your participation provided that you notify the Feinberg Graduate School of your decision. This allows another student on stand-by to attend the course and ensures the participation of a minimum number of students (required for the course to open).

Molecular & Cellular Neuroscience

The nervous system underlies everything that is human, including sensation, movement, emotion, memory, and consciousness. The molecular and cellular processes that govern the formation of the nervous system, those that are essential for its normal function, as well as the processes that promote its breakdown and degeneration in disease are at the frontier of neuroscience.


Curriculum

  • First year

    Intensive course program (at least 16 credit points) and three rotations.
     

  • Second year
    Completion of 24 credit points overall, and commencement of research work in hosting lab. Continuation of the PhD track depends on successful candidacy exam and defense of PhD proposal, and on GPA ≥85.

 

  • Years 3 - 5.5
    Completion of the Ph.D. research project and acquisition of additional 6 credit points, totaling 30 points as required in the direct PhD track.


Required Coursework

During the first year of studies you must take the following courses:

  • Three core courses: Two Introduction to Neuroscience courses, plus one other core course (7.5 credit points)
  • Introduction to Statistics for Life Sciences (3 credit points)
  • Elective course (5.5 credit points)


During your second year of studies, you must take the following courses:

  • Two core courses (5 credit points) - at least one of them from the Introduction to Neuroscience Courses
  • One obligatory Scientific Writing course (0 credit points)
  • Elective courses (3 credit points)

 

Core Courses

Overall during the first two years, you must take at least three out of the following Core courses in Brain Sciences. Please note that most of these courses are offered once every two years:

  • IIntroduction to Neuroscience: Developmental Neuroscience
  • Introduction to Neuroscience: Cellular and Synaptic Physiology
  • Introduction to Neuroscience: Cell Biology and Pathology of the Neuron
  • Introduction to Neuroscience: Neurogenetics (form genes to behavior)


The remaining two core courses (to a total of fove core courses)can be:

  • From the core courses of the Systems/Computational & Cognition Neuroscience track
  • From the Biology core courses


Note:
If a core course awards more than 2.5 points, the balance of points (above 2.5 points) counts as credit from elective courses.
 

Your credit points in the first two years can include the following:

  • Up to 3 credit points from laboratory courses
  • Up to 4 credit points from seminar courses
  • Up to 0.5 (one half) credit point from lectures and presentations given in conferences
     

Note
Any deviation from these requirements must be approved in advance by the Board of Studies. Credit points can be taken from programs outside of the Life Sciences program but requires prior approval of the Board of Studies.

 

Rotations

All three rotations must be done in one of the research groups listed in this link. A rotation in other laboratories in Life Sciences and other faculties might be considered on an individual basis. Previous work or summer programs are not considered to be rotations.

 

Safety Course

All  students are required to take an obligatory safety course. You do not receive credit points for this course.

 

Ethics Course

All  students are required to take an obligatory ethics course. You do not receive credit points for this course.

 

Elective Courses

Most elective courses are offered once every two years. As a student in the Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience program, you may only take courses defined online as open to Life Sciences/Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience students. You can tell if a course is defined as open to the students in the program if the course description lists the number of credit points for the Life Sciences/Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience track.

For all other courses (Physics/Math/CS/Chemistry) please ask approval in advance from the head of the brain-sciences program. Without such approval, credit points will not be awarded for these courses.

 

Course in Scientific Writing

All students in the Life Sciences are required to take a Scientific Writing course in their second year. The Feinberg Graduate School randomly assigns second-year students to either the first semester or second semester course, and no registration is needed. If you are assigned to the course for one semester but would like to move over to the other semester, find a student who is willing to switch with you and notify the Feinberg Graduate School of the change.

 

Credit Points for External Courses

If you are interested in taking external courses, apply in advance to the Board of Studies and ask the Board to consider awarding you credit points for the courses you want to take. You can contact the Board by sending an email to the FGS Coordinator of Courses. The application should be made in advance and include all relevant information including the institution, lecturer, number of weekly hours, course syllabus and mode of grading.

 

Approval for an external course and the number of credit points awarded are at the discretion of the Board of Studies, and may differ from the credit awarded by the host institution. In principle, external courses are not awarded credit if they are entirely passive and do not include an exam or student presentation.

Please note: You may accumulate only up to 5 credit points from external courses.

 

Credit points for external lectures and presentations at conferences

If you present your research orally at a scientific conference, you may ask the Board to consider awarding you half credit point for your presentation. You can contact the Board by sending an email to the FGS Coordinator of Courses. You are entitled to receive up to a maximum of ONE HALF (0.5) of a credit point, in total, for the entire period of your MSc studies.

The following are pre-conditions for approval of credit points in this category:

  • You must give an oral lecture, not a poster presentation.
  • It must be presented at a meeting that is open to all; it cannot be a closed consortium.
  • It must be given within twelve months of submitting your request to the Board.
  • The meeting can take place in Israel or abroad.
  • You provide a letter of invitation to speak or a copy of the program with the presentation listed in it.
  • You must submit your request after the talk has taken place.

 

Registration, Attendance and Dropping Out of a Course

The Brain Science program offers three types of courses: Lecture courses, seminar courses and laboratory courses. All courses require pre-registration online. Regarding attendance and the option of dropping out of a course:
For Lecture Courses: Unless specified otherwise by the instructors, attendance in lecture courses is not obligatory. You may drop out of a lecture course, assuming it is not obligatory, at any time.

For Seminar and Laboratory Courses: Attendance in all meetings of a seminar or a laboratory course is obligatory. You may not withdraw from a seminar or laboratory course after it has started. However, before a course starts, you may choose to cancel your participation provided that you notify the Feinberg Graduate School of your decision. This allows another student on stand-by to attend the course and ensures the participation of a minimum number of students (required for the course to open).

Mathematics and Computer Science

Required Credit Points

You are required to accumulate 30 credit points during the two years of the program. At least 18 credit points must be accumulated within the first year.

 

First-Year Student Seminar

As an MSc student of Mathematics & Computer Science, you are required to attend a first-year student seminar. You do not receive credit points for the seminar.

 

Mathematical and Computational Projects

As a first-year student, you may obtain credit points for projects. Each project involves eight hours per week for fifteen weeks, and carries a maximum of 2 credits. You can only do one project per semester, and you cannot get credit for two projects with the same supervisor. All projects must be approved by the Board of Studies.

 

Enrichment Courses

You can obtain credit points for participation in the enrichment courses program. Subject to the recommendation of course instructors and approval by the Chair of the Board of Studies, you can obtain 2 credit points for each enrichment course, but not more than 4 credit points for courses in that category.

Systems Biology - Math & CS

Recent technological breakthroughs have transformed research in biology from studies of individual genes to studies of whole organisms and systems, allowing researchers for the first time to simultaneously view the activity of all of the genes. With such comprehensive data, it is now becoming possible to devise quantitative models aimed at explaining the workings of biological systems. The handling of such large-scale datasets and the development of such quantitative models and approaches for its analysis requires tools and skills from Computer Science, Statistics, the Physical Sciences, Engineering, and Biology. The Weizmann Institute has multiple research groups engaged in Computational Biology, Systems Biology, and Bioinformatics research, and is a recognized worldwide leader in this research field. Research in this area at Weizmann is highly diverse, ranging in the type and complexity of the quantitative approaches being applied, in the organisms studied, and in the balance between biology and computation.

 

About the Program

Since applicants to the program are expected to come from a highly diverse set of backgrounds, including the Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computer Science, Engineering and Biology, they are interviewed by an interdisciplinary interview committee comprised of three faculty members. Note: Outstanding students in the program have the opportunity to continue to the Direct PhD track

 

Required Credit Points

You are required to accumulate 26 credit points during the two years of the program. At least 16 credit points must be accumulated within the first year.

 

First-Year Student Seminar

As an MSc student of Mathematics & Computer Science, you are required to attend a first-year student seminar. You do not receive credit points for the seminar.

 

Required Coursework

You are required to take at least 3 core courses from the list below:

  • Host-microorganism interactions in physiology and disease
  • Contemporary Systems Biology
  • Cell Biology by the Numbers
  • Introduction to statistical inference and learning
  • Convex Optimization
  • Basic Topics 1
  • Introduction to Statistical Learning Theory
  • Topics in Machine Learning
  • The RNA world
  • Random walks and algorithms
  • Protein Structure and Function 1
  • Transcriptional Control of Gene Expression

Archaeological Science

Important note:

The program does Not grant a degree in Archeological Science. Students who complete the program are awarded a Master's degree either in Chemical Sciences or in Life Sciences.


Acceptance to the Program

Applicants should have either

  • BSc in Natural Sciences or Engineering, and preferably some formal education in archeology/anthropology, or,

  • BA in Archeology with a minor in Natural Sciences or Engineering, or,

  • BA/BSc in Archeological Science

 

Duration of the program

24 months.

 

Rotations

Students in the program must complete three rotations in their first year of studies. One of the rotations can be substituted by a 2-week participation in an excavation.

 

Credit Points

Students must complete 24 credit points. 16 of them by the end of the first year.

 

Obligatory Courses

  • Field school in microarchaeology (2 credit points)

 

Prescribed Courses

The Board of Studies is likely to prescribe to students (on an individual basis) basic courses in either basic sciences or archeology/anthropology (the number of credit points for each such course will be determined in advance by the Board of Studies).

 

Elective Courses

  • Guided reading in archeological science (2 credit points)

  • Weekly archeological seminar (1 credit point)

  • Methodology courses - e.g. electron microscopy (1 credit point)

  • Courses offered to FGS students by other Boards of Studies - the selection of such courses, however, must be approved, in advance, by the head of the program.

 

Archeological Excavation

In addition to substituting a rotation with a participation in an archeological excavation, student may participate in another 2 or 3-week excavation and submit a 5-page report on the findings (2 credit points).

 

Conference Presentations

Students may be awarded once in the course of their MSc studies up to 1 credit point for a conference presentation.

 

Further information

For further information please contact the Head of the Archeological Science Program, Dr. Elisabetta Boaretto.

Science Teaching

Required Credit Points

You are required to accumulate 26 credit points.  At least 16 credit points must be accumulated within the first year. Credit points must be accumulated from courses prescribed by the Board of Studies, and any change needs to be approved ahead of time by the Chair of the Board of Studies.

 

Required Courses in Science Teaching

Out of the 26 required credit points, 10 credit points must be accumulated from the following required courses (2 credit points each):

  • Introduction to Science Education (or Introduction to Mathematics Education)
  • Introduction to the Methodology of Science Education Research
  • An advanced course in either quantitative or qualitative research methods
  • Cognition, Learning and Instruction
  • Thesis Seminar and Departmental Seminar

 

Elective Courses

Out of the 26 required credit points:

  • 6 credit points must be accumulated from elective courses in Science Teaching.
  • 10 credit points must be accumulated from elective courses in Science.

Each student should construct an individual list of courses in consultation with the advisor and the Chair of the Board of Studies.

 

Elective Courses in Science Teaching

Please note that not all courses are offered every year.

  • Cognition, Learning, and Instruction (Advanced course)
  • Quantitative Methods in Educational Research
  • A Workshop in Quantitative Methods in Educational Research
  • Issues in Qualitative Research Methods
  • A Workshop in Qualitative Methods in Educational Research
  • History and Philosophy of Science
  • Issues in Curriculum Research: Theory, Practice and Relevance to Current Trends
  • Change in Science Education

Courses & Exams

Coordiator
Ruth Kamensky
Contact email
+972-8-934-6092