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  • Date:24SundayFebruary 201925MondayFebruary 2019

    ISMS 2019

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Chairperson
    Sergey Malitsky
    Organizer
    Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities
    Homepage
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:24SundayFebruary 2019

    Computational Design Principles of Cognition

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    Time
    10:00 - 11:00
    Location
    Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Yuval Hart
    Harvard University
    Organizer
    Department of Neurobiology
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Driven by recent technological advancements, behavior and br...»
    Driven by recent technological advancements, behavior and brain activity can now be measured at an unprecedented resolution and scale. This “big-data” revolution is akin to a similar revolution in biology. In biology, the wealth of data allowed systems-biologists to uncover the underlying design principles that are shared among biological systems. In my studies, I apply design principles from systems-biology to cognitive phenomena. In my talk I will demonstrate this approach in regard to creative search. Using a novel paradigm, I discovered that people’s search exhibits exploration and exploitation durations that were highly correlated along a line between quick-to-discover/quick-to-drop and slow-to-discover/slow-to-drop strategies. To explain this behavior, I focused on the property of scale invariance, which allows sensory systems to adapt to environmental signals spanning orders of magnitude. For example, bacteria search for nutrients, by responding to relative changes in nutrient concentration rather than absolute levels, via a sensory mechanism termed fold change detection (FCD). Scale invariance is prevalent in cognition, yet the specific mechanisms are mostly unknown. I found that an FCD model best describes creative search dynamics and further predicts robustness to variations in meaning perception, in agreement with behavioral data. These findings suggest FCD as a specific mechanism for scale invariant search, connecting sensory processes of cells and cognitive processes in human. I will end with a broader perspective and outline the benefits of the search for computational design principles of cognition.
    Lecture
  • Date:24SundayFebruary 2019

    Scattering of radiation by porous and amorphous atmospheric aerosol

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    Time
    11:00
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Caryn Erlick-Haspel
    Hebrew University
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:24SundayFebruary 2019

    Network Formation of Oppositely Charged Polyelectrolytes

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Prof. Eyal Zussman
    NanoEngineering group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technion-
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Soft Matter and Biomaterials
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Mixing semi-dilute solutions of oppositely charged polyele...»

    Mixing semi-dilute solutions of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes generally yields compositions spanning complexes (solid) to coacervates (elastic liquid) to dissolved solutions with increasing salt concentration. In this work we show how to form a strong network of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes by using an interplay of hydrogen, hydrophobic, and electrostatic interactions.
    Lecture
  • Date:24SundayFebruary 2019

    Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2018-2019

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    Time
    13:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Eden Yifrach
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Student and Post-Doc Seminar
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:24SundayFebruary 2019

    An insight into symmetry properties of halide perovskites

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Prof. Jacky Even
    FOTON Institut, CNRS, INSA Rennes
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about 3D halide perovskites have emerged as a new class of semicon...»
    3D halide perovskites have emerged as a new class of semiconductors, but some basic optoelectronic properties of 3D bulk halide perovskites are still shrouded in mystery. The talk will start from a simplified representation of the halide perovskite lattice allowing to progressively account for various advanced topics.
    Lecture
  • Date:24SundayFebruary 2019

    TBA

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    Time
    15:00 - 16:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Assaf Rudich
    Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Pharmacology, BGU, Israel
    Organizer
    Life Sciences
    Metabollic Research Forum
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    Lecture
  • Date:24SundayFebruary 2019

    Halide perovskites: A new class of semiconductors with emergent properties

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    Time
    15:00 - 16:00
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Prof. Aditya Mohite
    Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Halide (hybrid) perovskites (HaP) have emerged as a new clas...»
    Halide (hybrid) perovskites (HaP) have emerged as a new class of semiconductors that truly encompass all the desired physical properties for building optoelectronic and quantum devices such as large tunable band-gaps, large absorption coefficients, long diffusion lengths, low effective mass, good mobility and long radiative lifetimes. In addition, HaPs are solution processed or low-temperature vapor grown semiconductors and are made from earth abundant materials thus making them technologically relevant in terms of cost/performance. As a result, proof-of-concept high efficiency optoelectronic devices such as photovoltaics and LEDs have been fabricated. In fact, photovoltaic efficiencies have sky rocketed to 23% merely in the past five years and are nearly on-par with mono-crystalline Si based solar cells. Such unprecedented progress has attracted tremendous interest among researchers to investigate the structure-function relationship and understand as to what makes Halide hybrid perovskites special?
    In my talk, I will attempt to answer some of the key questions and in doing so share the results from our work on HaPs over the past four years in understanding structure induced properties of HaPs. I will also highlight fundamental bottlenecks that exist going forward which present opportunities to create platforms to understand the interplay between light, fields and structure on the properties of perovskite-based materials.
    Lecture
  • Date:25MondayFebruary 2019

    Machine Learning Approach to Predict DNA Recombination Events

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    Time
    09:00 - 10:00
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Ido Azuri
    Bioinformatics Unit
    Organizer
    Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities
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    Lecture
  • Date:25MondayFebruary 2019

    "Augmenting biology through de novo protein design"

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Title
    title tbd
    Location
    Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Dek Woolfson
    University of Bristol
    Organizer
    Faculty of Chemistry
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Protein design—i.e., the construction of entirely new protei...»
    Protein design—i.e., the construction of entirely new protein sequences that fold into prescribed structures—has come of age: it is possible now to generate a wide variety stable protein folds from scratch using rational and/or computational approaches. A challenge for the field is to move from what have been largely in vitro exercises to protein design in living cells and, in so doing, to augment biology. This talk will illustrate what is currently possible in this nascent field using de novo -helical coiled-coil peptides as building blocks.1

    Coiled coils are bundles of 2 or more  helices that wrap around each other to form rope-like structures. They are one of the dominant structures that direct natural protein-protein interactions. Our understanding of coiled coils provides a strong basis for building new proteins from the bottom up. The first part of this talk will survey this understanding,1 our design methods,2,3 and our current “toolkit” of de novo coiled coils.4-6

    Next, I will describe how the toolkit can be used to direct protein-protein interactions and build complex protein assemblies in bacterial cells. First, in collaboration with the Savery lab (Bristol), we have used homo- and hetero-oligomeric coiled coils as modules in engineered and de novo transcriptional activators and repressors.7 Secondly, with the Warren (Kent) and the Verkade (Bristol) labs, we have engineered hybrids of a de novo heterodimer and a natural component of bacterial microcompartments to form a “cytoscaffold” that permeates E. coli cells.8 This can be used to support the co-localisation of functional enzymes.
    Colloquia
  • Date:25MondayFebruary 2019

    Soft excitations in glassy systems: Universal statistics, localization and structure-dynamics relations

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    Time
    14:15
    Lecturer
    Eran Bouchbinder
    WIS
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Glassy systems exhibit various universal anomalies compared ...»
    Glassy systems exhibit various universal anomalies compared to their crystalline counterparts, manifested in their thermodynamic, transport and strongly dissipative dynamical properties. At the heart of understanding these phenomena resides the need to quantify glassy disorder and to identify excitations that are associated with it. In this talk, I will review our recent progress in addressing these basic problems. I will first establish the existence of soft nonphononic excitations in glasses, which has been debated for decades. These low-frequency glassy excitations feature a localization length in space and follow a universal gapless density of states, and they are associated with the generic existence of frustration-induced internal-stresses in glasses. I will then discuss two major implications of these localized excitations: (i) Their relation to soft spots inside glassy structures that can be identified once the spatial distribution of the heat capacity is considered. These allow us to develop predictive structure-dynamics relations in the context of irreversible (plastic) rearrangements under nonlinear driving forces. (ii) Their effect on energy transport, in particular I will show that they lead to deviations from Rayleigh scattering scaling in the attenuation of sound. Open questions will be briefly mentioned.
    Lecture
  • Date:25MondayFebruary 2019

    Foundations of Computer Science Seminar

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    Time
    14:30 - 16:00
    Title
    Expander decomposition: fast static and dynamic algorithms
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 155
    Lecturer
    Thatchaphol Saranurak
    TTI
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of An (epsilon,phi)-expander decomposition of a graph G=(V,E) w...»
    An (epsilon,phi)-expander decomposition of a graph G=(V,E) with m edges is a partition of vertices into clusters such that (1) each cluster induces subgraph with conductance at least phi, and (2) the number of inter-cluster edges is at most epsilon m. This decomposition has a wide range of applications including approximation algorithms for the unique game, fast algorithms for flow and cut problems, and dynamic graph algorithms.

    I will describe a new algorithm for constructing (~O(phi),phi)-expander decomposition in ~O(m/phi) time. This is the first nearly linear time algorithm when phi is at least 1/polylog(m), which is the case in most practical settings and theoretical applications. Previous results either take Omega(m^{1 o(1)}) time, or attain nearly linear time but with a weaker expansion guarantee where each output cluster is guaranteed to be contained inside some unknown expander.

    Our technique can be easily extended to the dynamic setting where the graph undergoing updates. This talk is based on joint work with Di Wang [Saranurak Wang SODA'19].
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayFebruary 2019

    From brain organoids to animal chimera: Novel platforms for studying human brain development and disease

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    Time
    09:00 - 10:00
    Location
    Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Abed A. Mansour
    Laboratory of Genetics, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies
    Organizer
    Department of Neurobiology
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Due to the immense complexity of the human brain, the study ...»
    Due to the immense complexity of the human brain, the study of its development, function, and dysfunction during health and disease has proven to be challenging. The advent of patient-derived human induced pluripotent stem cells, and subsequently their self-organization into three-dimensional (3D) brain organoids, which mimics the complexity of the brain's architecture and function, offers an unprecedented opportunity to model human brain development and disease in new ways. However, there is still a pressing need to develop new technologies that recapitulate the long-term developmental trajectories and the complex in vivo cellular environment of the brain. To address this need, we have developed a human brain organoid-based approach to generate a chimeric human/animal brain system that facilitates long-term ana! tomical integration, differentiation, and vascularization in vivo. We also demonstrated the development of functional neuronal networks within the brain organoid and synaptic-cross interaction between the organoid axonal projections and the host brain. This approach set the stage for investigating human brain development and mental disorders in vivo, and run therapeutic studies under physiological conditions.
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayFebruary 2019

    Are you stressed? The molecular framework of the nutritional alarmones (p)ppGpp

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    Time
    10:00 - 11:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Gert Bange
    Philipps Univ. Marburg, Center for Synthetic Microbiology & Dept. of Chemistry, Germany
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The ability of bacteria to adapt their metabolism to nutrien...»
    The ability of bacteria to adapt their metabolism to nutrient limitation or environmental changes is essential for survival. The stringent response is a highly conserved mechanism that enables bacteria to respond to nutrient limitations. Central to stringent response is the synthesis of the nutritional alarmones pppGpp and ppGpp (collectively named: (p)ppGpp) that globally reprograms transcription and translation associated to variety of different cellular processes. In Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, three types of alarmone synthases (i.e., RelA, SAS1 and SAS2) have been identified that differ in length and domain composition. These differences might be attributed to their specific roles during stringent response. However, only little information on the molecular details is known. I will present our recent progress towards the structural/mechanistic understanding of the molecular framework of alarmone response.
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayFebruary 2019

    Chemical and Biological Physics and Organic Chemistry Seminar

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Title
    The Dynamics of Charged Excitons in Electronically and Morphologically Homogeneous Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Prof Michael J. Therien
    Duke University ‎
    Organizer
    Department of Chemical and Biological Physics
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The trion, a three-body charge-exciton bound state, offers u...»
    The trion, a three-body charge-exciton bound state, offers unique opportunities to simultaneously manipulate charge, spin and excitation in one-dimensional single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) at room temperature. Effective exploitation of trion quasiparticles requires fundamental insight into their creation and decay dynamics. Such knowledge, however, remains elusive for SWNT trion states, due to the electronic and morphological heterogeneity of commonly interrogated SWNT samples, and the fact that transient spectroscopic signals uniquely associated with the trion state have not been identified. Here length-sorted SWNTs and precisely controlled charge carrier-doping densities are used to determine trion dynamics using femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. Identification of the trion transient absorptive hallmark enables us to demonstrate that trions (i) derive from a precursor excitonic state, (ii) are produced via migration of excitons to stationary hole-polaron sites, and (iii) decay in a first-order manner. Importantly, under appropriate carrier-doping densities, exciton-to-trion conversion in SWNTs can approach 100% at ambient temperature. We further show that ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy, coupled with these fundamental insights into trion formation and decay dynamics, enables a straightforward approach for quantitatively evaluating the extent of optically-driven free carrier generation (FCG) in SWNTs: this work provides fundamental new insights into how quantum yields for optically-driven FCG [Φ(Enn → h+ + e−)] in SWNTs may be modulated as functions of the optical excitation energy and medium dielectric strength. Collectively, these findings open up new possibilities for exploiting trions in SWNT optoelectronics, ranging from photovoltaics, photodetectors, to spintronics.
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayFebruary 2019

    Algebraic Geometry and Representation Theory Seminar

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:30
    Title
    On the algebraic structure of solvable lattice models and knot theory
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 155
    Lecturer
    Doron Gepner
    WIS
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of TBA ...»
    TBA
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayFebruary 2019

    A Clockwork Wikipedia: a case study into knowledge and facts in the digital age

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    Time
    11:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Omer Benjakob and Rona Aviram
    Omer Benjakob, Cohn Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Ideas, Tel Aviv University and Rona Aviram, Department of Biomolecular Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science
    Organizer
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Prof. Ron Milo...»
    Host: Prof. Ron Milo
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayFebruary 2019

    Diffusion-Enhanced Photon Inference (DEPI) for accurate retrieval of distance distributions in single-molecule FRET experiments

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Prof. Eitan Lerner
    HUJI
    Organizer
    Department of Structural Biology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:27WednesdayFebruary 2019

    Diamond quantum technologies: magnetic sensing, hyperpolarization and noise spectroscopy

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Prof. Nir Bar-Gill
    Dept. of Applied Physics, Racah Institute of Physics, HUJI
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Nitrogen Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond have emerged over t...»
    Nitrogen Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond have emerged over the past few years as well-controlled quantum systems, with promising applications ranging from quantum information science to magnetic sensing.
    In this talk, I will first introduce the NV center system and the experimental methods used for measuring them and controlling their quantum spin dynamics. I will mention the application of magnetic sensing using NVs through the realization of a magnetic microscope [1].
    I will then describe our work on nuclear hyperpolarization, potentially relevant for enhanced MRI contrast, and research into open quantum systems and quantum thermodynamics [2].
    Finally, I will present related control sequences, which can be used to perform optimized quantum noise spectroscopy, allowing for precise characterization of the environment surrounding a quantum sensor [3].
    1. E. FARCHI ET. AL., SPIN 7, 1740015 (2017).
    2. HOVAV, Y., NAYDENOV, B., JELEZKO, F. AND BAR-GILL, N., PHYS. REV. LETT. 120, 6, 060405 (2018)
    3. Y. ROMACH ET. AL., PHYS. REV. APPLIED 11, 014064 (2019).
    Lecture
  • Date:28ThursdayFebruary 2019

    Publishing in Nature Communications

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    Time
    10:00 - 11:00
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Dr. Bo Liu
    Associate Editor, Nature Communications
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about In this talk, I will introduce the Nature Communications jou...»
    In this talk, I will introduce the Nature Communications journal, the editorial office in Shanghai, the editorial process and insiders’ view on the Nature Communications.


    Bo joined Nature Communications in March 2017. Following his undergraduate studies in Zhejiang University, China, he obtained his PhD in Physics at National University of Singapore. He then carried out his postdoctoral research at Graphene Research Center in Singapore and University of Washington. He currently handles manuscripts on solar cells and halide perovskite photophysics. Bo is based in the Shanghai office.
    Lecture

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