February 2016

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Monday25Jan

ISOTDAQ 2016

Date
Monday, January 25, 2016 to Tuesday, February 02, 2016
Time
All day
Location
David Lopatie Conference Centre
Kimmel Auditorium
Chairperson
Daniel Lellouch
Homepage
Contact
Conference
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Monday01Feb

The Third Learning Sciences Conference:Bridging Between Brain Sciences and Learning Sciences

Date
Monday, February 01, 2016
Time
08:30 - 16:00
Location
Michael and Anna Wix Auditorium
Chairperson
Anat Yarden
Homepage
Contact
Conference
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Monday01Feb

Effect of the structural changes in PSII on the heat stress response in green algae Chlamidomonas reinhardtii

Date
Monday, February 01, 2016
Time
14:00
Location
Ullmann Building of Life Sciences
Aharon Katzir Hall
Lecturer
Volha Shmidt
Prof. Avigdor Scherz’s Lab., Dept. of Plant & Environmental Sciences,WIS
Organizer
Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
Contact
Lecture
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Monday01Feb

Statistical physics of systems when all particles are different

Date
Monday, February 01, 2016
Time
14:15
Location
Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
Room A
Lecturer
Dino Osmanovic
Bar-Ilan University
Organizer
Department of Physics of Complex Systems
Contact
Abstract
Many real world systems contain a multiplicity of interactions, however, this complexity is usually difficult to capture using statistical physics. In this talk the "All Particles are Different" (APD) model is introduced, where the energy with which any pair of particles in an ensemble interact is some quenched random variable. We first present results of simulations of APD systems and then discuss some more theoretical aspects using simplified lattice APD models.

Lecture
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Tuesday02Feb

ESCRT mediated mammalian cell abscission: New tools, new players and new concepts

Date
Tuesday, February 02, 2016
Time
10:00 - 11:00
Location
Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Auditorium
Lecturer
Dr. Natalie Elia
Dept. of Life Sciences Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev
Organizer
Department of Biological Chemistry
Contact
Abstract
Conserved from archaea to mammals, ESCRT filamentous system executes membrane fission in a variety of processes in cells including viral budding, formation of multivesicular bodies, plasma membrane repair, nuclear envelope assembly and cytokinetic abscission. Yet, many of the mechanistic steps that lead to ESCRT-driven membrane fission in cells have not been resolved. We use high-resolution microscopy and molecular tools to study ESCRT driven membrane constriction and fission during cytokinetic abscission of mammalian cells. With this approach we aim to unlock the mechanistic principals of ESCRT mediated membrane fission in physiological process utilizing the ESCRT machinery for its function.
Lecture
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Tuesday02Feb

Chemical Physics Department Guest Seminar

Date
Tuesday, February 02, 2016
Time
11:00
Title
A Trajectory's Tale
Location
Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
Room 404
Lecturer
Dr Yasmine Meroz
Harvard University
Organizer
Department of Chemical Physics
Contact
Abstract
Dynamics of biological systems are inherently stochastic from the level of protein fluctuations, to cellular transport, and all the way to sensorimotor responses of whole organisms. In many cases the observed stochastic dynamics exhibit exotic properties such as memory, correlations and non-Gaussian propagators, which cannot be explained simply due to thermal noise, pointing at complex underlying physics. I present an approach seeded in the statistical physics analysis of stochastic trajectories [1], to relate such observed complex characteristics to minimal models of the underlying physics.
I utilise this framework to investigate the high-dimensional subdiffusive dynamics of protein fluctuations, characterising the structure of the rough energy landscape and revealing the coexistence of distinct origins of subdiffusion [2]. The multiple analogies between protein dynamics and glassy systems hint that this approach may also shed light on the latter.
I then use a similar approach to tackle information processing mechanisms in biological systems, where I analyse the response trajectories of cell chemotaxis to known stimuli [3]. I present a minimal model which represents stochastic processing via a memory kernel, and predicts a coupling between the fast membrane polarization (sensing), and the slow cytoskeletal polarization (movement). The model successfully recovers experimental observations including directional memory.
Lecture
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Tuesday02Feb

Molecular Neuroscience Forum Seminar

Date
Tuesday, February 02, 2016
Time
15:00 - 16:00
Title
Old peptides – new insights
Location
Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Botnar Auditorium
Lecturer
Prof. Mike Ludwig
University of Edinburgh
Organizer
Department of Biological Chemistry
Homepage
Contact
Lecture
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Wednesday03Feb

Dark matter beams at neutrino facilities

Date
Wednesday, February 03, 2016
Time
11:00 - 12:30
Location
Tel Aviv University
Lecturer
Claudia Frugiuele
Weizmann Institute
Organizer
Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics
Homepage
Contact
Details
10:45 Refreshments
12:30 Lunch
Abstract
I will discuss the discovery prospects of light dark matter at neutrino facilities.
I will give first an overview on the current bounds on the quarks-light dark matter interaction and I will then explain why neutrino experiments can improve on these bounds focusing in particular on present and future Fermilab experiments such as MiniBoone and LBNF.
Lecture
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Wednesday03Feb

G-INCPM Special Seminar - Dr. Nir London, Dept. of Organic Chemistry, Weizmann - "Covalent Docking of Large Chemical Libraries for the Discovery of New Inhibitors"

Date
Wednesday, February 03, 2016
Time
11:00 - 12:30
Location
Nancy and Stephen Grand Israel National Center for Personalized Medicine
Auditorium
Lecturer
Dr. Nir London
Dept. of Organic Chemistry, Weizmann Institute
Organizer
Department of Biological Chemistry
Contact
Abstract
Small molecules are invaluable tools for the investigation of biology. However, discovering new molecules to specifically modulate a target protein is still one of the biggest challenges of chemical biology. Molecules that are able to form a covalent bond with their target often show enhanced selectivity, potency and utility for biological studies, but are yet harder to discover, as they are typically expunged from high throughput screening libraries. Computational methods can help bridge this gap. We developed a covalent docking method for the discovery of covalent probes. Applying this method prospectively to several protein targets we were able to discover potent covalent inhibitors (typically with <50nM IC50), with chemotypes not previously explored. The docking predictions were confirmed by crystallography, the inhibitors displayed marked selectivity and were active in cellular assays. This approach should be applicable for a broad range of protein targets, and enables the exploration of a large chemical space while minimizing actual synthesis and experimental testing.


Lecture
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Wednesday03Feb

Following Function in Real Time: Structure and Dynamics in Batteries and Supercapacitors

Date
Wednesday, February 03, 2016
Time
11:00
Location
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
Lecturer
Prof. Clare Grey
Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge
Organizer
Department of Materials and Interfaces
Contact
Details
The development of light, long-lasting rechargeable batteries has been an integral part of the portable electronics revolution. This revolution has transformed the way in which we communicate and transfer and access data globally. The invention of the lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery, a rechargeable battery in which lithium ions (Li+) shuttle between two materials (LiCoO2 and graphitic carbon) has been an integral part of these advances. Rechargeable batteries are now poised to play an increasingly important role in transport and grid applications, but the introduction of these devices comes with different sets of challenges. Importantly, fundamental science is key to producing non-incremental advances and to develop new strategies for energy storage and conversion.

This talk will focus on our work on the development of methods that allow devices to be probed while they are operating (i.e., in-situ). This allows, for example, the transformations of the various cell components to be followed under realistic conditions without having to disassemble and take apart the cell. To this end, the application of new in and ex-situ Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and X-ray diffraction approaches to correlate structure and dynamics with function in lithium-ion and lithium air batteries and supercapacitors will be described. The in-situ approach allows processes to be captured, which are very difficult to detect directly by ex-situ methods. For example, we can detect side reactions involving the electrolyte and the electrode materials, sorption processes at the electrolyte-electrode interface, and processes that occur during extremely fast charging and discharging. Complementary Ex-situ NMR investigations allow more detailed structural studies to be performed, to correlate local and long-range structure with performance.

After a general overview of our in situ NMR and MRI studies on batteries and supercapacitors, this talk will focus on our recent work on olivines, spinels and Ge/Si anodes. The development of new NMR approaches to investigate paramagnetic battery materials, both in and ex situ, will be discussed, the approach making use of both theory and experiment. Although it is difficult to achieve high-resolution spectra from these paramagnetic materials in the in situ experiments, measurements of the relaxation time allow access to the dynamics of the lithium ions in real time as a function of state of charge. Finally, the use of NMR spectroscopy, in the study of disordered and amorphous anode materials will be described.
Lecture
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Wednesday03Feb

“The 750 GeV resonance as a sgoldstino”

Date
Wednesday, February 03, 2016
Time
13:30 - 15:00
Location
Tel Aviv University
Lecturer
Diptimoy Ghosh
Weizmann Institute
Organizer
Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics
Homepage
Contact
Abstract
I will discuss the papers arXiv:1512.05330, arXiv:1512.05333 and arXiv:1512.05723 which put forward an interpretation of the di-photon excess recently reported by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations as a new resonance arising from the sgoldstino which is the scalar superpartner of the goldstino, the Goldstone fermion of spontaneous supersymmetry breaking.
Lecture
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Thursday04Feb

Pelletron series - by invitation

Date
Thursday, February 04, 2016
Time
All day
Contact
Lecture
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Thursday04Feb

The Revolution of the Kepler Space Mission: Exo-planets, Binaries and circumbinary planets

Date
Thursday, February 04, 2016
Time
All day
Location
Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
Auditorium
Lecturer
Tsevi Mazeh
TAU
Organizer
Faculty of Physics
Contact
Details
11:00 – coffee, tea, and more
Abstract
TBA
Colloquia
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Thursday04Feb

Engineering the brain

Date
Thursday, February 04, 2016
Time
08:00 - 08:00
Location
David Lopatie Conference Centre
Kimmel Auditorium
Chairperson
Rony Paz
Homepage
Contact
Conference
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Thursday04Feb

Geometric Functional Analysis and Probability Seminar

Date
Thursday, February 04, 2016
Time
11:15 - 13:00
Title
Fluctuations of linear statistics of determinantal processes
Location
Jacob Ziskind Building
Room 261
Lecturer
Gaultier Lambert
KTH Royal Inst. of Technology
Organizer
Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
Contact
Abstract
Determinantal point processes arise in the description of eigenvalues of unitary invariant Hermitian random matrices, as well as in many statistical mechanics models such as random tilings, non-intersecting paths, etc. I will explain a cumulant method developed by A. Soshnikov to analyze the asymptotics distributions of linear statistics of determinantal processes and certain combinatorial identities associated with the sine process. I will present some applications to orthogonal ensembles and, if time permits, to certain biorthogonal ensembles and discuss some models which exhibit a transition from Poisson to GUE.
Lecture
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Thursday04Feb

Virology club

Date
Thursday, February 04, 2016
Time
12:15 - 13:00
Title
decoding infection by ribosome profiling
Location
Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Botnar Auditorium
Lecturer
Dr. Noam Stern-Ginossar
Organizer
Faculty of Biology
Contact
Lecture
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Thursday04Feb

Peletron Series - by invitation

Date
Thursday, February 04, 2016
Time
16:00 - 17:45
Location
Peletron
Contact
Lecture
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Sunday07Feb

The Batsheva de Rothschild Seminar on Biomineralization: Mineral Formation by Organisms

Date
Sunday, February 07, 2016 to Saturday, February 13, 2016
Time
All day
Location
Mashabei Sadeh and Interuniver
Chairperson
Stephen Weiner
Homepage
Contact
Conference
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Sunday07Feb

From Biological Self-Assembly to Novel Peptide Nanostructures of Unique Mechanical, Optical, Piezoelectric and Semiconductive Properties

Date
Sunday, February 07, 2016
Time
11:00 - 12:00
Location
Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
Room 404
Lecturer
Prof. Ehud Gazit
Department of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tel Aviv University
Organizer
Department of Materials and Interfaces
Contact
Details
Bio-inspired nanotechnology is a key direction in the field of molecular self-assembly. Concept and notions from biological self-assembly allow the design and fabrication of nanomaterials, while molecular self-assembly paradigm could be applied to biological systems. Our works on the mechanism of aromatic peptide self-assembly, lead to the discovery that the diphenylalanine recognition motif self-assembles into peptide nanotubes with a remarkable persistence length. Other aromatic homodipeptides (including those with non-coded amino acids such as DOPA) could self-assemble in nano-spheres, nano-plates, nano-fibrils and hydrogels with nano-scale order. The modification of peptide building blocks with the Fmoc protecting group allows the formation of hydrogels with nano-scale order. We demonstrated that the peptide nanostructures have unique chemical, physical and mechanical properties including ultra-rigidity as aramides, semi-conductive, piezoelectric and non-linear optic properties. We also demonstrated the ability to use these peptide nanostructures as casting mould for the fabrication of metallic nano-wires and coaxial nano-cables. The application of the nanostructures was demonstrated in various fields including electrochemical biosensors, tissue engineering, and molecular imaging. We had developed ways for depositing of the peptide nanostructures and their organization. We had use inkjet technology as well as vapour deposition methods to coat surface and from the peptide “nano-forests”. We recently demonstrated that even a single phenylalanine amino-acid can form well-ordered fibrilar assemblies of distinct electron diffraction pattern and toxic properties. The combination of DNA properties and peptide backbone in the form of Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) resulted in light emitting assemblies that exhibit both stacking and Watson-Crick base-pairing. We recently extended our studied to single amino acids and metabolites. We established the concept that even these entities can form well-ordered assemblies with amyloid like properties including ultrastructural morphology, toxicity leading to apoptosis, ThT-binding, and Congo-red birefringence.

Selected References:
1. Reches, M. and Gazit, E. (2003) Casting Metal Nanowires within Discrete Self-Assembled Peptide Nanotubes. Science 300, 625-627.
2. Reches, M. and Gazit, E. (2006) Controlled Patterning of Aligned Self-Assembled Peptide Nanotubes. Nature Nanotechnology 1, 195-200.
3. Adler-Abramovich L., Aronov D., Beker P., Yevnin M., Stempler S., Buzhansky L., Rosenman G. and Gazit E. (2009) Self-Assembled Arrays of Peptide Nanotubes by Vapour Deposition. Nature Nanotechnology 4, 849-854.
4. Adler-Abramovich, L., Vaks, L., Carny, O., Trudler, D., Frenkel, D., & Gazit, E. (2012) Phenylalanine Assembly into Toxic Fibrils Suggests Amyloid Etiology in Phenylketonuria. Nature Chem. Biol. 8, 701-706.
5. Levin, A. Mason, T. O., Adler-Abramovich, L., Buell, A. K., Meisl, G., Galvagnion, C., Bram, Y., Dobson, C. M., Knowles, T. P. J., & Gazit, E. (2014) Ostwald’s Rule of Stages Governs Structural Transitions and Morphological Control of a Dipeptide Supramolecular Polymer. Nature Commun. 5:5219.
6. Berger, O., Adler-Abramovich, L., Levy-Sakin, M., Grunwald, A., Liebes-Peer, Y., Bachar, M., Buzhansky, L., Mossou, E., Forsyth, V. T., Schwartz, T., Ebenstein, Y., Frolow, F., Shimon, L. J.W., Patolsky, F. & Gazit E. (2015) Light Emitting Self-Assembled Peptide Nucleic Acids Exhibit Both Stacking and Watson-Crick Base-Pairing. Nature Nanotechnology 10, 353-360.
7. Berger, O., Yoskovitz, E., Adler-Abramovich, L., & Gazit, E. (2016) Spectral Transition in Bio-Inspired Self-Assembled Peptide Nucleic Acid Photonic Crystals. Adv. Mater. (in press).
Lecture
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Sunday07Feb

Bacterial Response to Hydration-Desiccation Cycles in Arid Soils

Date
Sunday, February 07, 2016
Time
11:00
Location
Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
M. Magaritz Seminar Room
Lecturer
Osnat Gillor
The Department of Environmental Hydrology & Microbiology (EHM) Ben Gurion University of the Negev
Organizer
Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
Contact
Lecture
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Sunday07Feb

Towards precision oncology: uncovering tumor-specific amino acid vulnerabilities by differential ribosome codon reading

Date
Sunday, February 07, 2016
Time
11:00
Location
Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Auditorium
Lecturer
Prof. Reuven Agami
Professor of Genetics and Pathology. Head of Division of Gene Regulation. The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam
Organizer
Department of Molecular Cell Biology
Contact
Lecture
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Sunday07Feb

Cap-independent protein translation controls cell fate decisions in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

Date
Sunday, February 07, 2016
Time
13:00
Location
Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Botnar Auditorium
Lecturer
Maya David
Adi Kimchi's group, Dept. of Molecular Genetics, WIS
Organizer
Department of Molecular Genetics
Contact
Lecture
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Sunday07Feb

Afternoon Music - The Israel Camerata Jerusalem with Israel Gurion - Free entrance

Date
Sunday, February 07, 2016
Time
16:30 - 17:30
Location
Michael and Anna Wix Auditorium
Contact
Details
French songs and stories.
Cultural Events
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Monday08Feb

Systems Biology of Noncoding RNAs

Date
Monday, February 08, 2016 to Thursday, February 11, 2016
Time
All day
Location
David Lopatie Conference Centre
Kimmel Auditorium
Chairperson
Igor Ulitsky
Homepage
Contact
Conference
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Monday08Feb

"Differential Sensing – Concepts and Applications"

Date
Monday, February 08, 2016
Time
11:00 - 12:15
Title
Pearlman lecture (colloquium) - Chemistry
Location
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
Lecturer
Prof. Eric Anslyn
Chemistry Department, University of Texas, Austin
Organizer
Faculty of Chemistry
Contact
Abstract
The mammalian senses of taste and smell utilize a series of cross-reactive receptors, rather than highly selective receptors. Our group mimics this principle with a series of synthetic and designed receptors for the analysis of complex analytes in real-life settings. The receptors derive from a combination of rational chemical design and modeling, with combinatorial synthesis techniques. Optical signaling often derives either from indicator-displacement assays, or direct modulation of the spectroscopy of the receptor. It will be shown that a union of designed receptors targeted to a class of analytes, with combinatorial methods, gives fingerprints that differentiate between the individual members of the analyte class. The strategy is to use a core-binding element that imparts a bias to each and every member of the library, ensuring affinity of the library members for the class of analytes being targeted. The design of this core derives from standard molecular recognition principles: preorganization, complementary, pair-wise interactions between receptor and analyte, and desolvation. Imparting a bias to the affinity of the library members dramatically reduces the diversity space needed in the library. The fingerprints of the solutions are created using artificial neural networks, principle component analysis, and/or discriminate analysis. The technique represents a marriage of supramolecular chemistry and pattern recognition protocols, and has become known as differential sensing. A variety of examples will be presented, ranging from applications in the biological sciences to commercial beverage analysis.
Colloquia
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Monday08Feb

Common mechanism links ER stress, oxidative stress, DNA damage and cell death.

Date
Monday, February 08, 2016
Time
14:00
Title
Cancer Research Club Seminar
Location
Raoul and Graziella de Picciotto Building for Scientific and Technical Support
Seminar Room
Lecturer
Prof. Menachem Rubinstein
Organizer
Department of Biological Regulation
Contact
Lecture
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Monday08Feb

Predictive modeling in 2D materials: morphology, defects, synthesis

Date
Monday, February 08, 2016
Time
14:00 - 15:00
Location
Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
Room 404
Lecturer
Prof. Boris I. Yakobson
Department of Materials Science & NanoEngineering, Department of Chemistry, and the Richard E. Smalley Institute, Rice University
Organizer
Department of Materials and Interfaces
Contact
Details
It is of great interest and importance for materials design to uncover, through computational and theoretical modeling, the following relationships: {basic atomic interactions  structure/morphology  functionality (including electronic)}. We will discuss recent examples from low-dimensional materials, where we seem to achieve satisfactory degree of understanding, mostly focusing on nucleation and islands shapes of graphene, h-BN, metal dichalcogenides MX2 [1], grain boundaries and dislocations [2], heterojunctions [3], catalysis [4], and even predictive 2D boron synthesis [5].
[1] V. Artyukhov et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 115502 (2015); V. Artyukhov, Z. Hu et al. unpublished; Z. Zhang et al. Nano Lett. DOI:10.1021/acs.nanolett.5b04874 (2016).
[2] X. Zou et al. Nano Lett. 15, 3495 (2015); A. Aziz et al. Nature Comm. 5, 4867 (2014); Y. Liu et al. Nano Lett. 14, 6782 (2014).
[3] Y. Gong et al. Nature Mater. 13, 1135 (2014); A. Kutana, H. Yu et al. unpublished.
[4] Y. Liu et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 028304 (2014); X. Zou et al. Acc. Chem. Res. 48, 73 (2015).
[5] Y. Liu et al. Angew. Chemie 52, 3156 (2013); Z. Zhang et al. Angew. Chemie 127, 13214, DOI: 10.1002/anie.201505425 (2015).
Lecture
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Tuesday09Feb

Plant microbiome- from ecology to future applications

Date
Tuesday, February 09, 2016
Time
11:15
Location
Ullmann Building of Life Sciences
Aharon Katzir Hall
Lecturer
Dr. Dror Minz
Institute for Soil, Water and Environmental Sciences, Agriculture Research Organization (ARO), Volcani Research Center, Bet Dagan
Organizer
Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
Contact
Details
http://www.agri.gov.il/en/people/677.aspx
Lecture
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Tuesday09Feb

The neurobiology of visual search in barn owls

Date
Tuesday, February 09, 2016
Time
12:30
Location
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
Lecturer
Prof. Yoram Gutfreund
Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Haifa
Organizer
Department of Neurobiology
Contact
Abstract
Nature has created mechanisms to detect salient objects like food, prey or mates. Visual search is the process of shifting gaze from one salient object to another. It has both a stimulus driven bottom-up component as well as a task-driven top-down component. This is well studied in human and primates but not so much in other animals. It is, therefore, a challenge to increase our understanding of visual search in non-primate animals. The barn owl is a predator having frontally oriented eyes, but lacking eye movements. Because of such specializations, this bird offers itself for the study of visual search. We study mechanisms of visual search in this animal on both the behavioural and neurophysiological levels. In this talk I will present our main findings on these matters.
Lecture
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Wednesday10Feb

Nuclear mechanics controls synchronised DNA replication in muscle nuclei

Date
Wednesday, February 10, 2016
Time
10:00
Location
Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Botnar Auditorium
Lecturer
Talila Volk
Dept. of Molecular Genetics, WIS
Organizer
Life Sciences
Contact
Lecture
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Wednesday10Feb

Chemical Physics Department Guest Seminar

Date
Wednesday, February 10, 2016
Time
13:00
Title
Directing Charge Transfer in Nanoparticle Assemblies
Location
Perlman Room 402
Lecturer
Prof David Waldeck
Pittsburgh University
Organizer
Department of Chemical Physics
Contact
Lecture
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Thursday11Feb

From Molecular Gyroscopes to Homeo¬morphic Isomerization: Molecules that Turn Themselves Inside-Out

Date
Thursday, February 11, 2016
Time
11:00 - 12:00
Location
Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
Dov Elad Room
Lecturer
Dr. John A. Gladysz
Department of Chemistry Texas A&M University
Organizer
Department of Organic Chemistry
Contact
Lecture
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Thursday11Feb

A spins-inside quantum processor

Date
Thursday, February 11, 2016
Time
11:15 - 12:30
Location
Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
Auditorium
Lecturer
Lieven Vandersypen
Delft
Organizer
Faculty of Physics
Contact
Details
11:00 – coffee, tea, and more
Abstract
A quantum computer holds the promise of solving some problems that are beyond the reach of the most powerful supercomputers. Due to theoretical and experimental breakthroughs in the last few years, we are now at a point where the feeling grows that a large-scale quantum computer can actually be built. Increasingly, this requires bridging the disciplines, from physics to engineering, materials science and computer science. In this talk, I will present the start-of-the-art in quantum computing and outline the challenges ahead, with a focus on electron spin qubits in semiconductors.
Colloquia
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Thursday11Feb

Learning Nature’s Strategies for Making Unusual Sugars:

Date
Thursday, February 11, 2016
Time
14:00 - 15:00
Title
Biosynthesis of 2-thioglucose in BE-7585A
Location
Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
Dov Elad Room
Lecturer
Prof. Hung-wen Liu
University of Texas at Austin, Austin
Organizer
Department of Organic Chemistry, Department of Structural Biology
Contact
Lecture
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Thursday11Feb

Lee A. Segel Prize in Theoretical Biology

Date
Thursday, February 11, 2016
Time
15:00
Title
ceremony
Location
Jacob Ziskind Building
Lobby
Organizer
Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
Contact
Lecture
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Thursday11Feb

Shimon Even Prize in Theoretical Computer Science

Date
Thursday, February 11, 2016
Time
15:00 - 16:00
Location
Jacob Ziskind Building
Lobby
Organizer
Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
Contact
Lecture
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Thursday11Feb

Interdisciplinary discussion club – by invitation

Date
Thursday, February 11, 2016
Time
16:30 - 18:15
Location
Peletron
Contact
Lecture
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Friday12Feb

Magician tricks bubble show - children's theater in Russian

Date
Friday, February 12, 2016
Time
17:00 - 18:30
Location
Michael and Anna Wix Auditorium
Contact
Details
Tickets:0527046897
Cultural Events
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Saturday13Feb

The City - Hip Hop Opera

Date
Saturday, February 13, 2016
Time
21:00 - 22:30
Location
Michael and Anna Wix Auditorium
Contact
Cultural Events
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Sunday14Feb

From host genetics to microbiome: Immunity in the genomic era

Date
Sunday, February 14, 2016 to Tuesday, February 16, 2016
Time
08:00 - 08:00
Location
David Lopatie Conference Centre
Kimmel Auditorium
Chairperson
Ido Amit
Homepage
Contact
Conference
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Sunday14Feb

Metal Organic Frameworks: a Platform for Electrocatalytic Fuel Generation

Date
Sunday, February 14, 2016
Time
11:00
Location
Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
Room 404
Lecturer
Dr. Idan Hod
Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University
Organizer
Department of Materials and Interfaces
Contact
Details
Over the last two decades, metal organic frameworks (MOFs) have attracted a great deal of
scientific interest due to their extremely high porosity and surface areas. Traditionally, the vast
number of combinations of metal node and ligand-based properties made MOFs exciting
candidates for a wide variety of applications including gas storage, chemical separation and
catalysis, in which bulk crystalline powders or solution dispersions of MOFs have been used.
However, to date only a few attempts have been made to explore the incorporation of MOFs into
thin films to be used in electrocatalytic reactions.
In this talk, I will present some of our latest findings in the synthesis of MOF-based thin films
and demonstrate that an electrode-supported MOF scaffold could serve as a versatile platform
when utilized in an electrochemical system. A focus will be given on the study of the physical
mechanisms that govern charge transport properties in redox-active MOFs, as well as on new
strategies developed to control MOFs conductivity. Additionally, the different advantages of
using MOFs in electrocatalysis will be elucidated and demonstrated by our recent proof-ofprinciple
work on MOF-based systems for electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER),
CO2 reduction and Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER).
Lecture
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Sunday14Feb

Buffering variability of morphogen gradients

Date
Sunday, February 14, 2016
Time
13:00
Location
Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Botnar Auditorium
Lecturer
Neta Strasser
Benny Shilo's group, Dept. of Molecular Genetics, WIS
Organizer
Department of Molecular Genetics
Contact
Lecture
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Sunday14Feb

Friction is Fracture: Classical shear cracks drive the onset of frictional motion

Date
Sunday, February 14, 2016
Time
13:15
Location
Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
Drory Auditorium
Lecturer
Prof. Jay Fineberg
The Racah Institute of Physics The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Organizer
The Clore Center for Biological Physics
Contact
Lecture
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Monday15Feb

Chemical Physics Department Guest Seminar

Date
Monday, February 15, 2016
Time
10:00
Title
Brain cells under controlled micro-environments
Location
Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
Room 404
Lecturer
Dr Catherine Villard
CNRS/UPMC/Institut Curie
Organizer
Department of Chemical Physics
Contact
Abstract
Working on the cellular microenvironment by using microengineering tools is pivotal for the implementation of neuronal circuits in vitro. On the other hand, the interaction between specific environnements involving topographies, adhesive constraints or soft materials may give a novel access to some characteristics of brain cells (e.g. mechanosensitivity or axonal affinity for edges).
I will illustrate these two points by presenting some results obtained at the Institut Néel (my former lab in Grenoble) and now at Physico-chimie Curie (Paris) on axonal specification and guidance, from the scale of single neurons to that of brain cell populations. I will in particular focus on the dynamics of neuronal growth and address the issues of neuronal length and volume.
Lecture
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Monday15Feb

Life Science Colloquium

Date
Monday, February 15, 2016
Time
11:00 - 12:00
Title
TBD
Location
Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
Lecturer
Prof. Luca Scorrano
Director, Venetian Institute of Molecular Medicine, Chair of Biochemistry, Dept. of Biology, University of Padua, Italy
Organizer
Life Sciences
Contact
Colloquia
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Monday15Feb

G-INCPM-Special Seminar: Prof. Emeritus Ira Krull, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Northwestern University, USA - "Top-Down Protein Sequencing by Mass Spectrometry, Quo Vadis?

Date
Monday, February 15, 2016
Time
14:00 - 15:00
Location
Nancy and Stephen Grand Israel National Center for Personalized Medicine
Auditorium
Lecturer
Prof. Emeritus Ira Krull
Dept. of Chemistry & Chemical Biology, Northwestern University, USA
Organizer
Department of Biological Chemistry
Contact
Lecture
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Monday15Feb

Mechanical Yield to Plastic Flow in Amorphous Materials

Date
Monday, February 15, 2016
Time
14:15
Lecturer
Itamar Procaccia,WIS
Organizer
Department of Physics of Complex Systems
Contact
Abstract
Materials that exhibit a "yield" phenomenon response elastically to small strains or stresses, but at some critical value of the stress they yield mechanically and exhibit a complex plastic flow. The search of criteria to distinguish the properties of the material before and after the yield was long and futile; none of the standard signatures like correlation functions, Voronoi tesselations or any other "structural" measure succeeded to clarify the difference between pre-yield and post-yield configurations. I willexplain in this talk how to construct a new order parameter that allows us to show that the yield phenomenon is a bona-fide first order thermodynamic phase transition, shedding an entirely new light on the
phenomenon.

Materials that exhibit a "yield" phenomenon response elastically to small strains or stresses, but at some critical value of the stress they yield mechanically and exhibit a complex plastic flow. The search of criteria to distinguish the properties of the material before and after the yield was long and futile; none of the standard signatures like correlation functions, Voronoi tesselations or any other "structural" measure succeeded to clarify the difference between pre-yield and post-yield configurations. I willexplain in this talk how to construct a new order parameter that allows us to show that the yield phenomenon is a bona-fide first order thermodynamic phase transition, shedding an entirely new light on the
phenomenon.

Lecture
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Monday15Feb

Foundations of Computer Science Seminar

Date
Monday, February 15, 2016
Time
14:30 - 16:00
Title
Anchoring games for parallel repetition
Location
Jacob Ziskind Building
Room 261
Lecturer
Henry Yuen
MIT
Organizer
Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
Contact
Lecture
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Tuesday16Feb

Autophagy as housekeeping machinery to balance proteasomal degradation.

Date
Tuesday, February 16, 2016
Time
10:00 - 10:30
Location
Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Auditorium
Lecturer
Dr. Alik Demishtein
Dept. of Biological Chemistry-WIS
Organizer
Department of Biological Chemistry
Contact
Abstract
Protein homeostasis in the cell is regulated by two highly conserved pathways, the UPS and the autophagy. So far the link between these pathways was mainly evaluated by blocking the degradation flux through either pathway, thus limiting the ability to accurately assess the cross talk between the two systems. Here we demonstrate that knockdown of the proteasome integral ubiquitin receptors S5a and ADRM1, impairs polyubiquitinated substrate degradation by the 26S proteasome, while avoiding the global deleterious outcomes associated with proteasome inhibitors. We demonstrate that p62-mediated autophagy effectively balances the reduced proteasome capacity. Finally, we provide evidence for the mechanism linking the regulation of p62 expression with proteasome activity. We propose that upon impairment of the proteasomal flux short-lived transcription factors constitute an inherent feedback loop that upregulate p62 dependent autophagy, thereby maintaining cellular proteostasis and prevent the formation of protein aggregates.
Lecture
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Tuesday16Feb

Decoupling receptor orientation from IFN signaling

Date
Tuesday, February 16, 2016
Time
10:30 - 11:00
Location
Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Auditorium
Lecturer
Dr. Nanacha Sharma
Dept. of Biological Chemistry-WIS
Organizer
Department of Biological Chemistry
Contact
Abstract
Type I interferons serve as first line of defense against pathogen invasion. Binding of IFNs to its receptors, IFNAR1 and IFNAR2, is leading to activation of the IFN response. To determine whether structural perturbations observed during binding are propagated to the cytoplasmic domain, multiple mutation were introduced to the transmembrane helix (TMD) and it’s surrounding. Insertion of one to five alanine residues near either the N or C-terminus of the TMD promotes a rotation of 1000 and a translation of 1.5Å per added residue. Surprisingly, the added alanines had little effect on the binding affinity of IFN to the cell surface receptors, STAT phosphorylation or gene induction. Similarly, substitution of the juxtamembrane residues of the TMD with alanines, or replacement of the TMD of IFNAR1 with that of IFNAR2, did not effect IFN binding or activity. Finally, only addition of ten serine residues (but not 2 or 4) between the extracellular domain of IFNAR1 and the TMD had some effect on signaling. Bioinformatic analysis shows a correlation between high sequence conservation of TMDs of cytokine receptors and the ability to transmit structural signals. The sequence conservation near the TMD of IFNAR1 is low, suggesting limited functional importance for this region. Our results suggest that IFN binding to the extracellular domains of IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 promotes proximity between the intracellular domains, and that differential signaling is a function of duration of activation and affinity of binding rather than specific conformational changes transmitted from the outside to the inside of the cell.
Lecture
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Tuesday16Feb

TBA

Date
Tuesday, February 16, 2016
Time
11:00
Location
Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
M. Magaritz Seminar Room
Lecturer
Alexander Slocum
MIT
Organizer
Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
Contact
Lecture
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Tuesday16Feb

MAKING SMART POLYMERIC MICELLES SMARTER

Date
Tuesday, February 16, 2016
Time
11:00 - 12:00
Location
Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
Dov Elad Room
Lecturer
Dr. Roey Amir
Department of Organic Chemistry TEL AVIV UNIVERSITY
Organizer
Department of Organic Chemistry
Contact
Lecture
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Tuesday16Feb

The role of cytosolic ascorbate peroxidases in the stress response of seeds and pollens in Arabidopsis thaliana

Date
Tuesday, February 16, 2016
Time
11:15
Location
Ullmann Building of Life Sciences
Aharon Katzir Hall
Lecturer
Dr. Gad Miller
The Mina and Everard Goodman, Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar Ilan University
Organizer
Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
Contact
Details
http://gadmiller.wix.com/millerlab
Lecture
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Tuesday16Feb

Science Time - Popular Lecture

Date
Tuesday, February 16, 2016
Time
12:00 - 13:00
Location
Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
Lecturer
Prof. Dan Tawfik
Evolution, from the origin of life to our day
Organizer
Department of Media Relations
Homepage
Contact
Details
In Hebrew
Lecture
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Tuesday16Feb

On the dual role of IGF-1 receptor in information processing at hippocampal synapses

Date
Tuesday, February 16, 2016
Time
12:30
Location
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
Lecturer
Dr. Inna Slutsky
Dept of Physiology and Pharmacology Sackler School of Medicine Tel Aviv University
Organizer
Department of Neurobiology
Contact
Abstract
The insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) signaling is a key regulator of lifespan, growth, and development. While reduced IGF-1R signaling delays aging and Alzheimer’s disease progression, whether and how it regulates information processing at central synapses remains elusive. Here, we show that presynaptic IGF-1Rs are basally active, regulating synaptic vesicle release and short-term plasticity in excitatory hippocampal neurons. Acute IGF-1R blockade or transient knockdown suppresses spike-evoked synaptic transmission and presynaptic cytosolic Ca2+ transients, while promoting spontaneous transmission and resting Ca2+ level. This dual effect on transmitter release is mediated by mitochondria that attenuate Ca2+ buffering in the absence of spikes and decrease ATP production during spiking activity. We conclude that the mitochondria, activated by IGF-1R signaling, constitute a critical regulator of information processing in hippocampal neurons by maintaining evoked-to-spontaneous transmission ratio, while constraining synaptic facilitation at high frequencies. Excessive IGF-1R tone may contribute to hippocampal hyperactivity associated with Alzheimer’s disease.
Lecture
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Wednesday17Feb

Student Conference on Plant Stress- Ecology, physiology, metabolism, signaling and genetic regulation

Date
Wednesday, February 17, 2016
Time
All day
Location
David Lopatie Conference Centre
Chairperson
Shdema Filler
Homepage
Contact
Conference
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Wednesday17Feb

Mechanisms of Cell Migration in the Adult Heart

Date
Wednesday, February 17, 2016
Time
11:00 - 12:00
Title
Special Guest Seminar
Location
Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Room 18
Lecturer
Polina Goichberg
Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine Brigham & Women’s Hospital Harvard Medical School Boston, MA
Organizer
Department of Immunology
Contact
Lecture
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Wednesday17Feb

Aladdin - Children's theater

Date
Wednesday, February 17, 2016
Time
17:30 - 19:00
Location
Michael and Anna Wix Auditorium
Contact
Cultural Events
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Thursday18Feb

ILIF Annual meeting

Date
Thursday, February 18, 2016
Time
All day
Location
David Lopatie Conference Centre
Kimmel Auditorium
Chairperson
Ronen Alon
Homepage
Contact
Conference
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Thursday18Feb

Regulatory RNAs

Date
Thursday, February 18, 2016
Time
11:00
Location
Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Botnar Auditorium
Lecturer
Prof. Rajewsky Nikolaus
Berlin Institute for Medical Systems Biology, MDC
Organizer
Department of Molecular Genetics
Contact
Lecture
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Thursday18Feb

TBA

Date
Thursday, February 18, 2016
Time
11:15 - 12:30
Location
Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
Auditorium
Lecturer
Andreas Wallraf
ETH
Organizer
Faculty of Physics
Contact
Details
11:00 – coffee, tea, and more
Abstract
TBA
Colloquia
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Thursday18Feb

LIfe Science Lecture

Date
Thursday, February 18, 2016
Time
15:00 - 16:30
Title
Prof. Guy Shakhar
Location
Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
Auditorium
Lecturer
Prof. Guy Shakhar
Department of Immunology
Organizer
Life Sciences
Contact
Details
Blood-thirsty CTLs:
How hypoxia restricts tumor immunotherapy
Lecture
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Thursday18Feb

Rendez - vous to six - Russian theater

Date
Thursday, February 18, 2016
Time
20:00 - 22:00
Location
Michael and Anna Wix Auditorium
Contact
Details
Employees tickets purchasing:Ina 052-3684538

Tickets at Bravo:*3221
Cultural Events
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Friday19Feb

"Nathan's friends" on the stage - Chokerlia band ,Dina Or comedian

Date
Friday, February 19, 2016
Time
20:00 - 22:45
Location
Michael and Anna Wix Auditorium
Contact
Details
In the lobby : Light refreshments and dancing.
Tickets Nathan: 050-5647494
Cultural Events
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Saturday20Feb

Mevashlim Zugiut - Interactive show about love, relationship, divorce and food

Date
Saturday, February 20, 2016
Time
21:00 - 22:00
Location
Michael and Anna Wix Auditorium
Contact
Cultural Events
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Sunday21Feb

Aeolian Dust Emission from Semi-Arid Soils

Date
Sunday, February 21, 2016
Time
11:00
Lecturer
Itzhak Katra
Department of Geography and Environmental Development Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Organizer
Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
Contact
Lecture
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Sunday21Feb

The wind energy potential in Israel evaluated by the new IMS wind Atlas

Date
Sunday, February 21, 2016
Time
13:00
Location
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
Lecturer
Mr. Avner Furshpan
Director of Climatology, Israel Meteorological Service(IMS)
Organizer
Feinberg Graduate School
Contact
Details
Gathering and refreshments at 12:40
Lecture
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Sunday21Feb

The Cost of Living: How to Minimize the Cost of Gene Expression?

Date
Sunday, February 21, 2016
Time
13:00
Location
Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Botnar Auditorium
Lecturer
Idan Frumkin
Tzachi Pilpel's group, Dept. of Molecular Genetics, WIS
Organizer
Department of Molecular Genetics
Contact
Lecture
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Monday22Feb

Peroxisomes in health and disease

Date
Monday, February 22, 2016 to Thursday, February 25, 2016
Time
08:00 - 08:00
Location
David Lopatie Conference Centre
Kimmel Auditorium
Chairperson
Einat Zalckvar
Homepage
Contact
Conference
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Tuesday23Feb

Alilot Yichiye in Thailand - Comic Play

Date
Tuesday, February 23, 2016
Time
20:30 - 22:00
Location
Michael and Anna Wix Auditorium
Contact
Cultural Events
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Wednesday24Feb

To be announced

Date
Wednesday, February 24, 2016
Time
10:00
Location
Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Botnar Auditorium
Lecturer
Karina Yaniv
Dept. of Biological Regulation, WIS
Organizer
Life Sciences
Contact
Lecture
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Wednesday24Feb

Machine Learning and Statistics Seminar

Date
Wednesday, February 24, 2016
Time
11:15 - 12:15
Title
Real-time bidding and regret minimization
Location
Jacob Ziskind Building
Room 1
Lecturer
Nicolo Cesa-Bianchi
University of Milan
Organizer
Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
Contact
Abstract
In real-time bidding (RTB), ad exchanges run second-price auctions in a few milliseconds, allowing publishers to sell ad spaces to advertisers on a per-impression basis. The fact that RTB allows the accurate tailoring of impressions to the features of each individual user, has fueled the demand for algorithmic platforms that serve the needs of either the seller or the buyer. In this talk, we focus on the problem, faced by the seller, of dynamically optimizing the reserve price in each auction with the goal of maximizing overall revenue. We cast this problem in a regret minimization setting, and describe computationally efficient algorithms achieving regret of order T^{1/2} under various assumptions both on the information available to the seller and on the mechanism generating bids.
Joint work with Claudio Gentile (Varese) and Yishay Mansour (Tel-Aviv).
Lecture
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Thursday25Feb

Israel-India Workshop on Nanoscience

Date
Thursday, February 25, 2016
Time
All day
Location
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
Seminar Room
Chairperson
Reshef Tenne
Contact
Conference
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Thursday25Feb

TBA

Date
Thursday, February 25, 2016
Time
11:15 - 12:30
Location
Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
Auditorium
Lecturer
Roy Bar Ziv
WIS
Organizer
Faculty of Physics
Contact
Details
11:00 – coffee, tea, and more
Abstract
TBA
Colloquia
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Sunday28Feb

The 28th meeting of the Israeli mass spectrometry society - Joint with the British society

Date
Sunday, February 28, 2016 to Monday, February 29, 2016
Time
All day
Location
David Lopatie Conference Centre
Kimmel Auditorium
Chairperson
Michal Sharon
Contact
Conference
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Sunday28Feb

Deciphering Jupiter's internal flow using the Juno gravity measurements and an adjoint based dynamical model

Date
Sunday, February 28, 2016
Time
11:00
Location
Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
M. Magaritz Seminar Room
Lecturer
Eli Galanti
Earth and Planetary Sciences Weizmann Institute of Science
Organizer
Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
Contact
Abstract
The nature of the large-scale flow below the cloud level on Jupiter is still unknown. The observed surface wind might be confined to the upper layers, or be a manifestation of deep cylindrical flow. Moreover, it is possible that in the case where the observed wind is superficial, there exists deep flow that is completely separated from the surface. During the years 2016-17 Juno will both perform close flybys of Jupiter, obtaining a high precision gravity spectrum for the planet. This data can be used to estimate the depth of Jupiter observed cloud-level wind, and decipher a possible deep flow that is decoupled from the surface wind. In this talk I will discuss the Juno gravity experiment and the possible outcomes with regard to the flow on Jupiter.

We explore the possibility of complex wind dynamics that include both the upper-layer wind, and a deep flow that is completely detached from the flow above it. The surface flow is based on the observed cloud-level flow and is set to decay with depth. The deep flow is constructed synthetically to produce cylindrical structures with variable width and magnitude, thus allowing for a wide range of possible setups of the unknown deep flow. The combined 3D flow is then related to the density anomalies via a dynamical model and the resulting density field is then used to calculate the gravitational moments. An adjoint inverse model is constructed for the dynamical model, thus allowing backward integration of the dynamical model, from the expected observations of the gravity moments to the parameters controlling the setup of the deep and surface flows.

We show that the model can be used for examination of various scenarios, including cases in which the deep flow is dominating over the surface wind. The novelty of our adjoint based inversion approach is in the ability to identify complex dynamics including deep cylindrical flows that have no manifestation in the observed cloud-level wind. Furthermore, the flexibility of the adjoint method allows for a wide range of dynamical setups, so that when new observations and physical understanding will arise, these constraints could be easily implemented and used to better decipher Jupiter flow dynamics.
Lecture
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Monday29Feb

Schmidt Lecture - "Stimuli-Responsive Smart Soft Materials"

Date
Monday, February 29, 2016
Time
11:00 - 12:30
Location
Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
Lecturer
Prof. Takuzo Aida
Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo
Organizer
Faculty of Chemistry
Contact
Abstract
Machine technology frequently
puts magnetic or electrostatic
repulsive forces to practical use,
as in maglev trains, vehicle
suspensions or non-contact
bearings. In contrast, materials
design overwhelmingly focuses
on attractive interactions, such
as in the many advanced
polymer-based composites, where inorganic fillers interact with a polymer matrix to improve
mechanical properties. However, articular cartilage strikingly illustrates how electrostatic repulsion
can be harnessed to achieve unparalleled functional efficiency: it permits virtually frictionless
mechanical motion within joints, even under high compression. Here we describe a composite
hydrogel with anisotropic mechanical properties dominated by electrostatic repulsion between
negatively charged unilamellar titanate nanosheets embedded within it. Crucial to the behaviour of this
hydrogel is the serendipitous discovery of cofacial nanosheet alignment in aqueous colloidal
dispersions subjected to a strong magnetic field, which maximizes electrostatic repulsion6 and thereby
induces a quasi-crystalline structural ordering over macroscopic length scales and with uniformly
large face-to-face nanosheet separation. We fix this transiently induced structural order by
transforming the dispersion into a hydrogel using light-triggered in situ vinyl polymerization. The
resultant hydrogel, containing charged inorganic structures that align cofacially in a magnetic flux,
deforms easily under shear forces applied parallel to the embedded nanosheets yet resists compressive
forces applied orthogonally. We anticipate that the concept of embedding anisotropic repulsive
electrostatics within a composite material, inspired by articular cartilage, will open up new
possibilities for developing soft materials with unusual functions.
Colloquia
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Monday29Feb

The landscape of DNA methylation in cancer; therapeutic and diagnostic implications

Date
Monday, February 29, 2016
Time
14:00
Title
Cancer Research Club Seminar
Location
Raoul and Graziella de Picciotto Building for Scientific and Technical Support
Seminar Room
Lecturer
Dr. Moshe Szyf
Organizer
Department of Biological Regulation
Contact
Lecture