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  • Date:22MondayOctober 2018

    "Composition-Dependent Functions of Biomolecular Condensates"

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:15
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Prof. Michael Rosen
    UT Southwestern Medical Center
    Organizer
    Faculty of Chemistry
    Contact
    Colloquia
  • Date:22MondayOctober 2018

    G-INCPM - Special Seminar - Dr. Wolfgang Mann, CEO, BlueCatBio GmbH, Germany - "Blue Washer: the most cost-effective tool to improve data quality (z') for adherent cellular assays"

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:15
    Location
    Nancy and Stephen Grand Israel National Center for Personalized Medicine
    Auditorium
    Organizer
    Life Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Since its introduction in 2015 the BlueWasher has rapidly be...»
    Since its introduction in 2015 the BlueWasher has rapidly become the de-facto standard for media change & cell wash in adherent cellular assays.
    The BlueWasher uses centrifugation instead of aspiration to remove liquids from all plate formats, including 1536w, eliminating background and variability at their (assay) sources. Highly reproducible residual volumes 10x lower than conventional plate washers enable imagers to produce cleaner images, raising z' 0.1-0.3 for typical adherent cellular assays. Higher z' means to miss fewer active compounds and reduce false positives to re-screen. BlueWasher immediately improves screening economics without complex assay or automation changes, delivering unparalleled ROI and direct boost to overall drug discovery productivity.
    A technical introduction into centrifugation based cell wash / media changed will be followed by a number of examples discussing improvement of data quality in HTS / HCS. Other bead based applications like nucleic acids extraction or protein binding assays will be presented as well.

    Lecture
  • Date:22MondayOctober 2018

    Genomic and Epigenomics club

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Camelia Botnar Building
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Eske Willerslev
    Organizer
    Life Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:22MondayOctober 2018

    Targeting DNA and RNA repeats responsible for neurological disorders by small organic molecules

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Title
    Special Guest Seminar
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Kazuhiko Nakatani
    Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Japan
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:22MondayOctober 2018

    Collective formation of territories in scent-marking animal population

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    Time
    14:15
    Location
    Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Room A
    Lecturer
    Luca Giuggioli
    Luca Giuggioli Bristol University, UK
    Organizer
    Department of Physics of Complex Systems
    Statistical Physics Seminar
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about While a great deal of studies have been devoted to explain t...»
    While a great deal of studies have been devoted to explain the emerging patterns observed in schools of fish and flocks of birds, there exist many other animal collective movement phenomena where alignment does not play a role. One important example is the formation of animal territories, a form a spatial segregation relatively common in mammals. When the mechanism of territorial exclusion occurs via marks deposited on the terrain, one talks about stigmergy, a form of environment-mediated interaction often encountered in social insect societies. To study these stigmergic systems in mammals I have introduced the so-called territorial random walk model consisting of a collection of discrete random walkers that (scent) mark any lattice site they visit. As deposited marks remain active for a finite amount of time, each walker retreats upon encountering an active foreign scent. The emerging spatio-temporal dynamics of the system is analysed both at the meso and micro-scale.
    At the meso-scale the scented territories can be quite rich. Short-lived marks produce rapidly morphing and highly mobile territories, while long-lived marks yield slow territories with a narrowly defined shape distribution. More importantly the full dependence in territory mobility as a function of the time for which individual marks remain active is accompanied by a liquid-hexatic-solid transition akin to the Kosterlitz-Thouless melting scenario, the first ecological model to predict such a transition.
    At the micro-scale, and when population density is sufficiently large, I introduce localized walls to mimic the sharp (retreat) interaction when an animal encounters a foreign scent. A mean-field approximation then allows to represent via a Fokker-Planck formalism an animal roaming within neighbouring territorial boundaries whose movement statistics is subdiffusive and constrained by a spring whose equilibrium length makes the territory size equal to the inverse of the population density. Application of this approximate analytic model to movement data from a red fox population in Bristol, UK, is also shown.
    If time allows, I will mention about an algorithmic implementation in the context of territorial searching robots.
    References
    [1] A. Heiblum-Robles and L. Giuggioli, Phase transitions in stigmergic territorial systems, accepted.
    [2] L. Giuggioli, I. Ayre, A. Heiblum Robles and G.A. Kaminka, From ants to birds: a novel bio-inspired approach to on-line area coverage, in Groß R et al. (eds) Distributed Autonomous Robotic Systems, Springer Proceedings in Advanced Robotics, vol 6, pp. 31-43 (2018).
    [3] L. Giuggioli and V.M. Kenkre, Consequences of animal interactions on their dynamics: emergence of home ranges and territoriality, Move. Ecol. 2(1), 20 (2014).
    [4] L. Giuggioli, J.R. Potts, D.I. Rubenstein and S.A. Levin, Stigmergy, collective actions and animal social spacing, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 110(42):16904-9 (2013).
    [5] J.R. Potts, S. Harris and L. Giuggioli, Quantifying behavioral changes in territorial animals caused by sudden population declines, Am. Nat. 182:e73-e82 (2013).
    [6] L. Giuggioli, J.R. Potts and S. Harris, Predicting oscillatory dynamics in the movement of territorial animals, J. Roy. Soc. Interface 9(72):1529-43 (2012).
    [7] J.R. Potts, S. Harris and L. Giuggioli, Territorial dynamics and stable home range formation for central place foragers, PLoS ONE 7(3):e34033 (2012).
    [8] L. Giuggioli, J.R. Potts and S. Harris, Brownian walkers within subdiffusing territorial boundaries, Phys. Rev. E 83:061138/1-11 (2011).
    [9] L. Giuggioli, J.R. Potts and S. Harris, Animal interactions and the emergence of territoriality, PLoS Comp. Biol. 7(3):e10020
    Lecture
  • Date:23TuesdayOctober 201825ThursdayOctober 2018

    Modern teaching methods and soft skills development in science

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Chairperson
    Ron Blonder
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:23TuesdayOctober 2018

    The seeds of ice in clouds

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    Time
    11:00
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Prof. Ben Murray
    University of Leeds
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:23TuesdayOctober 2018

    Northern exposure – The study of host-virus interactions from the lab to the Norwegian Fjords

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    Time
    11:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Daniella Schatz
    Prof. Assaf Vardi's lab., Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Organizer
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:23TuesdayOctober 2018

    Synapsins regulate alpha-synuclein function

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    Time
    12:30
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Dr. Daniel Gitler
    Dept of Physiology and Cell Biology/Faculty of Health Sciences and Zlotowksi Center for Neuroscience Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
    Organizer
    Department of Neurobiology
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Dr.Ivo Spiegel ivo.spiegel@weizmann.ac.il tel: 4415 ...»
    Host: Dr.Ivo Spiegel ivo.spiegel@weizmann.ac.il tel: 4415
    For assistance with accessibility issues, please contact naomi.moses@weizmann.ac.il
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The normal function of alpha-synuclein, a protein involved i...»
    The normal function of alpha-synuclein, a protein involved in Parkinson's Disease and other synucleinopathies, remains elusive. Though recent studies suggest that alpha-synuclein is a physiological attenuator of synaptic vesicle recycling, mechanisms remain unclear. Our data show that synapsin – a cytosolic protein with established roles in synaptic vesicle mobilization and clustering – is required for alpha-synuclein function. Furthermore, we show that the two proteins interact in a reversible manner in the synapse and that in the absence of synapsins, the localization of alpha-synuclein to synapses is deficient. Our data suggest a model where alpha-synuclein and synapsin cooperate in clustering SVs and attenuating recycling.
    Lecture
  • Date:23TuesdayOctober 2018

    Chemical Approaches to Study Oxidative Protein Folding

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Dr. Norman Metanis
    Organizer
    Department of Structural Biology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:24WednesdayOctober 2018

    Transport and fate of Pt-based pharmaceuticals in natural soil-water environments

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    Time
    10:00
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Natalia Chana Goykhman
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences Weizmann Institute of Science
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:24WednesdayOctober 2018

    Spotlight on Science

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    Time
    12:00
    Title
    Detecting the Invisible: On Giant Detectors, Elusive Particles and Dark Matter
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Dr. Hagar Landsman
    Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:24WednesdayOctober 2018

    Emotional valence and implicit memory formation under anesthesia: Neural mechanisms in the amygdala and pre-frontal cortex

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Brain Research
    Lecturer
    Nir Samuel (PhD Thesis Defense)
    Rony Paz Lab, Dept of Neurobiology, WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Neurobiology
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Benoziyo Brain Research Building Room 113 For assistance ...»
    Benoziyo Brain Research Building Room 113

    For assistance with accessibility issues, please contact naomi.moses@weizmann.ac.il
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Background: The aim of anaesthesia is to eliminate awareness...»
    Background: The aim of anaesthesia is to eliminate awareness and prevent memory of the various aversive stimuli of medical procedures. Yet in a portion of cases, patients can recall events that occurred during surgery resulting in risks of adverse psychological outcomes. Fear conditioning offers a robust behavioral model to study this phenomenon, while the abundant evidence implicating the amygdala-medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) circuit in acquisition, consolidation and retrieval of these memories offers a natural hypothesis for the neural mechanisms.
    Objective: We aimed to study the effect of anaesthesia on stimulus valence, acquisition and memory and to identify the correlates in the mPFC-amygdala circuit using a primate model and clinically relevant doses of anesthesia.
    Materials and methods: Two non-human primates acquired aversive memories by tone-odor classical conditioning under anesthesia with different doses of ketamine, a non-competitive antagonist of NMDA and midazolam, a GABA agonist. Both agents are in wide clinical use. We simultaneously recorded single neurons in the BLA and mPFC. Analyses focused on behavioral and neural evidence suggesting maintained valence, acquisition and retention of memory.
    Results: Seventy-six full sessions from two non-human primates entered analysis. We recorded 172 amygdala and 189 dACC neurons respectively. We found evidence of successful aversive conditioning under both anesthetics and in all doses. Under anesthesia, we found behavioral evidence of retention in 46% of sessions matched by a complementary response of 16.2% and 18.7% of amygdala and mPFC neurons respectively. An increased and escalating amygdala and mPFC response during acquisition predicted later retention and correlated the behavioral result. The behavioral and neural representation of aversive valence was sufficient to drive learning and affected conditioning outcome.
    Conclusion: Our results suggest that under anesthesia, the perception of stimuli and implicit aversive memory formation may be maintained. We show patterns in the amygdala-mPFC circuit that precede and predict this phenomenon and that may serve future monitoring strategies of anesthetized patients. The use of a primate model and therapeutic doses of common anesthetics affecting both GABA and NMDA transmission improves the possible translation of our findings.

    Lecture
  • Date:24WednesdayOctober 2018

    Emotional valence and implicit memory formation under anesthesia: Neural mechanisms in the amygdala and pre-frontal cortex

    More information
    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Brain Research
    Lecturer
    Nir Samuel (PhD Thesis Defense)
    Rony Paz Lab, Dept of Neurobiology, WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Neurobiology
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Benoziyo Brain Research Building Room 113 For assistance ...»
    Benoziyo Brain Research Building Room 113

    For assistance with accessibility issues, please contact naomi.moses@weizmann.ac.il
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Background: The aim of anaesthesia is to eliminate awareness...»
    Background: The aim of anaesthesia is to eliminate awareness and prevent memory of the various aversive stimuli of medical procedures. Yet in a portion of cases, patients can recall events that occurred during surgery resulting in risks of adverse psychological outcomes. Fear conditioning offers a robust behavioral model to study this phenomenon, while the abundant evidence implicating the amygdala-medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) circuit in acquisition, consolidation and retrieval of these memories offers a natural hypothesis for the neural mechanisms.
    Objective: We aimed to study the effect of anaesthesia on stimulus valence, acquisition and memory and to identify the correlates in the mPFC-amygdala circuit using a primate model and clinically relevant doses of anesthesia.
    Materials and methods: Two non-human primates acquired aversive memories by tone-odor classical conditioning under anesthesia with different doses of ketamine, a non-competitive antagonist of NMDA and midazolam, a GABA agonist. Both agents are in wide clinical use. We simultaneously recorded single neurons in the BLA and mPFC. Analyses focused on behavioral and neural evidence suggesting maintained valence, acquisition and retention of memory.
    Results: Seventy-six full sessions from two non-human primates entered analysis. We recorded 172 amygdala and 189 dACC neurons respectively. We found evidence of successful aversive conditioning under both anesthetics and in all doses. Under anesthesia, we found behavioral evidence of retention in 46% of sessions matched by a complementary response of 16.2% and 18.7% of amygdala and mPFC neurons respectively. An increased and escalating amygdala and mPFC response during acquisition predicted later retention and correlated the behavioral result. The behavioral and neural representation of aversive valence was sufficient to drive learning and affected conditioning outcome.
    Conclusion: Our results suggest that under anesthesia, the perception of stimuli and implicit aversive memory formation may be maintained. We show patterns in the amygdala-mPFC circuit that precede and predict this phenomenon and that may serve future monitoring strategies of anesthetized patients. The use of a primate model and therapeutic doses of common anesthetics affecting both GABA and NMDA transmission improves the possible translation of our findings.

    Lecture
  • Date:25ThursdayOctober 2018

    Bose-Einstein condensation of photons

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:30
    Location
    Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Martin Weitz
    Institut für Angewandte Physik, Universität Bonn
    Organizer
    Faculty of Physics
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of 11:00 – coffee, tea, and more...»
    11:00 – coffee, tea, and more
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Bose-Einstein condensation has been observed in several phys...»
    Bose-Einstein condensation has been observed in several physical systems, including cold atomic gases, exciton-polaritons, and magnons. Photons usually show no Bose-Einstein con-densation, since for Planck’s blackbody radiation the particle number is not conserved and the photons at low temperatures vanish in the system walls. I here describe experiments with a dye-filled optical microresonator experimentally observing Bose-Einstein condensation of pho-tons. Thermalization is achieved in a number conserving way by repeated absorption re-emission cycles on the dye molecules, and the cavity mirrors provide both an effective photon mass and a confining potential. More recently, we have investigated calorimetric properties of the trapped photon gas, and determined both the heat capacity and the entropy around the phase transition. In other work, we have realized lattice potentials for photons in the dye mi-crocavity. In my talk, I will begin with a general introduction and give an account of current work and future plans of the Bonn photon gas experiment.
    Colloquia
  • Date:25ThursdayOctober 2018

    Hierarchical dynamics of visual inference

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    Time
    12:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Brain Research
    Lecturer
    Prof. Jochen Braun
    Institute of Biology Otto-von-Guericke Unversity, Magdeburg
    Organizer
    Department of Neurobiology
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Benoziyo Brain Research Building Room 113 Host: Prof. Dov...»
    Benoziyo Brain Research Building Room 113

    Host: Prof. Dov Sagi dov.sagi@weizmann.ac.il tel: 3747
    For assistance with accessibility issues, please contact naomi.moses@weizmann.ac.il
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Visual input is noisy, variable, and ambiguous. Optimal inf...»
    Visual input is noisy, variable, and ambiguous. Optimal inference of physical causes is challenging even for a restricted set of causes (e.g., orientations and spatial frequencies). It is well understood (e.g., Veliz-Cuba et al., 2016) that stochastic dynamical systems can approximate optimal inference by continuously accumulating and evaluating visual evidence. I will argue that the dynamics of multi-stable perception is consistent with just such an inference mechanism. Its psychophysically observable characteristics fully constrain a hierarchical dynamics with three levels, the lowest of which may conceivably correspond to cortical columns or clusters of columns. Given suitable inputs, this hierarchical dynamics accumulates and evaluates noisy evidence to make nearly optimal categorical discriminations. Moreover, its dynamical features seem to afford functional benefits in a volatile world, such as balancing stability and sensitivity of inference.

    References:
    Cao, Pastukhov, Mattia, Braun (2016) Collective activity of many bistable assemblies reproduces characteristic dynamics of multistable perception. J. Neurosci., 36: 6957-72.

    Veliz-Cuba, Kilpatrick, Josic (2016) Stochastic models of evidence accumulation in changing environments. SIAM Review, 58: 264-289.

    Lecture
  • Date:25ThursdayOctober 2018

    Geometric Functional Analysis and Probability Seminar

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    Time
    13:30 - 15:30
    Title
    Balancing vectors in any norm
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 155
    Lecturer
    Daniel Dadush
    CWI Amsterdam
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:25ThursdayOctober 2018

    Development of placenta-derived (PLX) cell therapy- from bench- to bedside

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Title
    Special Guest Lecture
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Racheli Ofir
    Vice President Research & Intellectual Property, {Pluristem, MATAM, Haifa
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about PLacental expanded (PLX) cells are placenta-derived, mesench...»
    PLacental expanded (PLX) cells are placenta-derived, mesenchymal-like adherent stromal cells expanded using a bioreactor system which provides a three dimensional (3D) micro-environment enabling tightly controlled expansion. Accumulated data from multiple in vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that these cells act via a paracrine or endocrine manner to facilitate healing of damaged tissue.
    Pluristem’s two lead placenta-derived cell products, PLX-PAD and PLX-R18, are each in clinical development for several indications. PLX-Immune is in non-clinical development stages for Cancer. Data from non-clinical as well as clinical studies will be presented.
    Lecture
  • Date:25ThursdayOctober 2018

    Pelletron meeting - by invitation only

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    Time
    16:00 - 17:30
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:28SundayOctober 201801ThursdayNovember 2018

    SAAC meeting

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    Title
    Scientific and Academic Advisory Committee meeting 2018
    Contact
    International Board

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