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  • Date:25TuesdaySeptember 2018

    “From “Crowdoxidation” to Organoselenide C-E Bond Cleavage: Enlisting the help of Chalcogens in Analysis of Biological Systems Trough Novel Probe Design”

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Prof. David G. Churchill
    Department of Chemistry, KAIST
    Organizer
    Department of Organic Chemistry
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Our laboratory is studying small molecule selenium-containin...»
    Our laboratory is studying small molecule selenium-containing organic and organometallic systems for their potential selective fluorescence imaging properties; our goal is to eventually probing aspects of neurodegenerative disease and disease models in a more precise way based on the present state of the art. Like some transition metals, heavier chalcogens also have capacity for redox with common changes in their valence state from 2 to 4 and from 4 to 6 being possible. Also, reduced heavier chalcogenide centers such as selenium have the ability for metal chelation. The optical characteristics are sometimes profoundly changed by an additional 2+ oxidation state at e.g. a selenium atom when the Se is in an aromatic ring or as a direct aryl substituent to a fluorogenic framework. While the atom which can become chemically oxidized may be contained within an aromatic ring, or present as a substituent, there is also the possibility for C-E bond rupture; C-Se bond c! leavage was studied with selective biothiol detection in mind and therefore, the extent of Se-C rupture possible is a design parameter in these small fluorogenic molecules and its study is ongoing. Sulfur chemistry in biology is dynamic and diverse; therefore, we are hereby exploring the extent of versatility available for selenium in small synthetic molecules in the context of biology, and specifically, towards better understanding and addressing aging and neurodegenerative disease research.
    Lecture
  • Date:27ThursdaySeptember 2018

    Special Physics Colloquium-

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:15
    Location
    Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Gerhard Rempe
    Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, Germany
    Organizer
    Faculty of Physics
    Special Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of 11:00 – coffee, tea, and more...»
    11:00 – coffee, tea, and more
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Quantum physics allows for applications not possible within ...»
    Quantum physics allows for applications not possible within classical physics. A prominent example is the quantum computer that, once realized, needs a quantum communication environment – a quantum internet. With this in mind, the talk will discuss a unique toolbox for distributed quantum computation and quantum communication by means of photonic qubits that propagate between atomic quantum memories localized in optical resonators as quantum interfaces.
    Colloquia
  • Date:07SundayOctober 201811ThursdayOctober 2018

    WIS Summer School: Introduction to Biological Physics for Students of Science and Engineering

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Chairperson
    Samuel Safran
    Organizer
    Academic Secretary, Feinberg Graduate School , Department of Chemical and Biological Physics
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:07SundayOctober 2018

    “Macrocycle-based Adventures in Self-Assembly”

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Prof. Jonathan L. Sessler
    The University of Texas at Austin
    Organizer
    Department of Organic Chemistry
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about We are working on new strategies for self-assembly. Systems ...»
    We are working on new strategies for self-assembly. Systems whose study is relatively advanced are the so-called cyclo[m]pyridine[n]pyrroles. These systems permit self-assembly via anion recognition. They also display substrate-dependent responsive features. This has made them of interest as sensor systems and functional materials whose ground and excited state properties may be “switched” through modulation of solvent, pH, and exposure to ionic and neutral analytes.
    Complementing work on charged building blocks is the use of electron rich calix[4]pyrroles. Here, anion binding serves to switch the fundamental conformation of the core receptor so as to control self-assembly. This allows the production of monomers, capsules, and oligomers via the judicious choice of calix[4]pyrrole, anion, cation, solvent, and targeted substrate. It also permits control over charge transfer interactions and the construction of multi-state molecular logic devices. One of these has permitted inters-species "chemical communication".
    Finally, a set of "Texas-size" box-like receptors has been created. These are permitting the chemistry of self-assembly and information storage to be extended into the realm of soft materials. Applications in the realm of water purification are also being explored.
    This work was made possible by the dedicated efforts of many coworkers and collaborators who will be thanked during the presentation. Support from the U.S. National Science Foundation, US National Institutes of Health, the US Department of Energy, and the Robert A. Welch Foundation is acknowledged. Funding has also come from Shanghai University.
    Lecture
  • Date:07SundayOctober 2018

    "What is it like to be a bat?" - A pathway to the answer from the Integrated Information Theory

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    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Brain Research
    Lecturer
    Dr. Naotsugu Tsuchiya
    School of Psychological Sciences, Monash Institute of Cognitive & Clinical Neuroscience Monash University, Australia
    Organizer
    Department of Neurobiology
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Benoziyo Brain Research Building Room 113 Host: Prof. Raf...»
    Benoziyo Brain Research Building Room 113

    Host: Prof. Rafi Malach rafi.malach@weizmann.ac.il tel: 2758
    For assistance with accessibility issues, please contact naomi.moses@weizmann.ac.il
    AbstractShow full text abstract about What does it feel like to be a bat? Is conscious experience ...»
    What does it feel like to be a bat? Is conscious experience of echolocation closer to that of vision or audition? Or, echolocation is non-conscious processing and it doesn't feel anything? This famous question of bats' experience, posed by a philosopher Thomas Nagel in 1974, clarifies the difficult nature of the mind-body problem. Why a particular sense, such as vision, has to feel like vision, but not like audition, is puzzling. This is especially so given that any conscious experience is supported by neuronal activity. Activity of a single neuron appears fairly uniform across modalities, and even similar to those for non-conscious processing. Without any explanation on why a particular sense has to feel as the way it does, researchers even cannot approach the question of the bats' experience. Is there any theory that gives us a hope for such explanation? Currently, probably none, except for one. Integrated Information Theory (IIT), proposed by Tononi in 2004 has a potential to offer a plausible explanation. IIT essentially claims that any system that is composed of causally interacting mechanisms can have conscious experience. And precisely how the system feels like is determined by the way the mechanisms influence each other in a holistic way. In this talk, I will give a brief explanation of the essence of IIT and provide initial empirical partial tests of the theory, proposing a potential scientific pathway to approach bats' conscious experience. If IIT, or its improved or related versions, is validated enough, it will gain credibility to accept its prediction on rough nature of bats' experience. If we can gain a sophisticated insight as to whether bats' experience is closer to vision or audition, it is already a tremendously big step in consciousness science, which is just a first yet critical one, possibly a similar level of the breakthrough in cosmology in precisely estimating the age of the universe.
    References:
    0) talk slide: https://www.slideshare.net/NaoNaotsuguTsuchiya/17-june-20-empirical-test-of-iit-dresden
    1) Andrew M. Haun, Masafumi Oizumi, Christopher K. Kovach, Hiroto Kawasaki, Hiroyuki Oya, Matthew A. Howard, Ralph Adolphs, Naotsugu Tsuchiya, (2017, accepted) “Conscious perception as integrated information patterns in human electrocorticography” eNeuro link
    2) Tsuchiya “"What is it like to be a bat?" - a pathway to the answer from the Integrated Information Theory ” Philosophy Compass (2017) link
    3) Oizumi M, Tsuchiya N, Amari S, “Unified framework for quantifying causality and integrated information in a dynamical system” (2016) PNAS link
    Lecture
  • Date:08MondayOctober 201810WednesdayOctober 2018

    Minerva Annual Meeting 2018

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    Time
    All day
    Title
    Minerva Committee interviews of scientists who submitted full proposals in all faculties
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    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about If you require further information, please contact Chaya Moy...»
    If you require further information, please contact Chaya Moykopf (4048)
    Academic Events
  • Date:08MondayOctober 2018

    "Materials by Design: Three-Dimensional (3D) Nano-Architected Metamaterials"

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:15
    Title
    Annual G.M.J. Schmidt Memorial Lecture
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Prof. Julia R. Greer
    Caltech
    Organizer
    Faculty of Chemistry
    Contact
    Colloquia
  • Date:08MondayOctober 2018

    Unraveling novel protease activity mechanisms at the tumor microenvironment of pancreas cancers

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Title
    Cancer Research Club
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Irit Sagi
    Dept. of Biological Regulation Weizmann Institute
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Homepage
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:11ThursdayOctober 2018

    Seminar for thesis defense

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    Time
    12:00 - 13:00
    Title
    “Creating and utilizing a novel yeast library to systematically characterize the yeast proteome”
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer
    Uri Weill
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Seminar
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:11ThursdayOctober 2018

    Understanding the crosstalk between RNA processing and signal transduction

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Title
    Special Guest Seminar
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Jingyi Hui
    Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:14SundayOctober 201819FridayOctober 2018

    Mol Med of Sphingolipids conference 2018

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Chairperson
    Anthony H. Futerman
    Organizer
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics
    Homepage
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:14SundayOctober 2018

    TBA

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    Time
    11:00
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Udi Strobach
    NASA GSFC
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:15MondayOctober 2018

    Life Science Colloquium

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Title
    TBD
    Location
    Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Jan van Deursen
    Mayo Clinic, Minnesota
    Organizer
    Life Sciences
    Contact
    Colloquia
  • Date:15MondayOctober 2018

    "Jupiter’s deep atmosphere revealed by Juno"

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:15
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Prof. Yohai Kaspi
    Earth and Planetary Sciences, WIS
    Organizer
    Faculty of Chemistry
    Contact
    Colloquia
  • Date:15MondayOctober 2018

    TBA

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Title
    Special Guest
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Maik Dahlhoff
    Institute of Molecular Animal Breeding and Biotechnology, LMU Muenchen, Germany
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:15MondayOctober 2018

    Building your Personal Brand: LinkedIn insights

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    Time
    15:00 - 16:00
    Location
    Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Tamir Huberman
    IDC Herzlia
    Organizer
    Feinberg Graduate School
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:16TuesdayOctober 2018

    Expeditious Synthesis of Bacterial Glycoconjugates

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Prof. Suvarn S. Kulkarni
    Indian Institute of Technology Bombay
    Organizer
    Department of Organic Chemistry
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Expeditious Synthesis of Bacterial Glycoconjugates Suvarn ...»
    Expeditious Synthesis of Bacterial Glycoconjugates
    Suvarn S. Kulkarni
    Department of Chemistry, IIT Bombay, Powai, Mumbai-400076
    Bacterial glycoconjugates are comprised of rare D and L deoxy amino sugars, which are not present on the human cell surface. This peculiar structural difference allows discrimination between the pathogen and the host cell and offers avenues for target-specific drug discovery and carbohydrate-based vaccine development. However, they cannot be isolated with sufficient purity in acceptable amounts, and therefore chemical synthesis is a crucial step toward the development of these products.1 We recently established short and convenient methodologies for the synthesis of orthogonally protected bacterial D and L-deoxy amino hexopyranoside and glycosamine building blocks starting from cheaply available D-mannose and L-rhamnose.2-4 The one-pot protocols rely on highly regioselective nucleophilic displacements of triflates. These procedures have been applied to the synthesis of various bacterial glycoconjugates2-8 (Figure 1) as well as metabolic oligosaccharide engineering.7


    1) Emmadi, M.; Kulkarni, S. S. Nat. Prod. Rep. 2014, 31, 870-879. 2) Emmadi, M.; Kulkarni, S. S. Nature Protocols 2013, 8, 1870-1889. 3) Sanapala, S. R.; Kulkarni S. S. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016, 138, 4938−4947. 4) Sanapala, S. R.; Kulkarni S. S. Org. Lett. 2016, 18, 3790–3793. 5) Podilapu, A. R.; Kulkarni, S. S. Org. Lett. 2014, 16, 4336-4339. 6) Sanapala, S. R.; Kulkarni, S. S., Chem. Eur. J. 2014, 20, 3578-3583. 7) Clark, E.; I.; Emmadi, M.; Krupp, K. L.; Podilapu, A. R.; Helble, J. D.; Kulkarni, S. S.; Dube, D. H. ACS Chem Biol 2016, 11, 3365-3373. 8) Podilapu, A. R.; Kulkarni, S. S. Org. Lett. 2017, 19, 5466-5469.
    Lecture
  • Date:16TuesdayOctober 2018

    “Beauty and Benefits of cryo-EM; Resolving the 3D structure of the Type VII secretion system in Mycobacterium tuberculosis”

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Prof. Peter Peters
    Maastricht Multimodal Molecular Imaging institute (M4I).
    Organizer
    Department of Structural Biology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:17WednesdayOctober 2018

    G-INCPM-Special Seminar - Prof. Rony Seger, Department of Biological Regulation, Weizmann Institute - "Targeting the nuclear translocation of MAPKs as a novel anti-inflammatory and anti cancer therapy"

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:15
    Location
    Nancy and Stephen Grand Israel National Center for Personalized Medicine
    Auditorium
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about A hallmark of MAPK signaling is their nuclear translocation ...»
    A hallmark of MAPK signaling is their nuclear translocation upon stimulation, which is necessary for their physiological/pathological functions. We have identified two novel, distinct, regulated nuclear translocation mechanisms for ERK1/2 and JNK/p38, of which we made use of as a promising therapeutic approach. We developed a myristoylated, NTS-derived phosphomimetic peptide (EPE peptide), which blocked ERK1/2 nuclear translocation. In culture, the EPE peptide induced apoptosis of melanoma cells, inhibited the proliferation of other cancer cells but had no effect on immortalized cells. Combination of the EPE peptide and the MEK inhibitor had synergistic antitumor activity in mutated NRAS, BRAF and NF1 melanoma and Kras pancreatic cells. In xenograft models, the peptide was significantly more effective than BRAF inhibitors in preventing tumor recurrence of treatment-eradicated melanoma xenografts. We also developed p38-derived myristoylated peptide, termed PERY peptide, which inhibited the importin interaction with JNK1/2 and p38α/β and prevented their nuclear translocation. This peptide affected viability of several breast cancer-derived cell lines, and significantly reduced inflammation and intestinal damage in a mouse model of colitis. Moreover, the peptide inhibited inflammation-induced colorectal cancer in a AOM/DSS mouse model. Taken together, both the cancer and inflammatory models support the use of nuclear translocation of MAPKs as a novel drug target for signaling-related diseases.
    Lecture
  • Date:17WednesdayOctober 2018

    G-INCPM-Special Seminar - Prof. Rony Seger, Department of Biological Regulation, Weizmann Institute - "Targeting the nuclear translocation of MAPKs as a novel anti-inflammatory and anti cancer therapy"

    More information
    Time
    11:00 - 12:15
    Location
    Nancy and Stephen Grand Israel National Center for Personalized Medicine
    Auditorium
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about A hallmark of MAPK signaling is their nuclear translocation ...»
    A hallmark of MAPK signaling is their nuclear translocation upon stimulation, which is necessary for their physiological/pathological functions. We have identified two novel, distinct, regulated nuclear translocation mechanisms for ERK1/2 and JNK/p38, of which we made use of as a promising therapeutic approach. We developed a myristoylated, NTS-derived phosphomimetic peptide (EPE peptide), which blocked ERK1/2 nuclear translocation. In culture, the EPE peptide induced apoptosis of melanoma cells, inhibited the proliferation of other cancer cells but had no effect on immortalized cells. Combination of the EPE peptide and the MEK inhibitor had synergistic antitumor activity in mutated NRAS, BRAF and NF1 melanoma and Kras pancreatic cells. In xenograft models, the peptide was significantly more effective than BRAF inhibitors in preventing tumor recurrence of treatment-eradicated melanoma xenografts. We also developed p38-derived myristoylated peptide, termed PERY peptide, which inhibited the importin interaction with JNK1/2 and p38α/β and prevented their nuclear translocation. This peptide affected viability of several breast cancer-derived cell lines, and significantly reduced inflammation and intestinal damage in a mouse model of colitis. Moreover, the peptide inhibited inflammation-induced colorectal cancer in a AOM/DSS mouse model. Taken together, both the cancer and inflammatory models support the use of nuclear translocation of MAPKs as a novel drug target for signaling-related diseases.
    Lecture

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