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  • Date:21ThursdayJanuary 2021

    Machine Learning and Statistics Seminar

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    Time
    18:00 - 19:00
    Title
    Learning on Pointclouds for 3D Scene Understanding
    Lecturer
    Or Litany
    NVIDIA's Toronto AI lab
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of In this talk i'll be covering several works in the topi...»
    In this talk i'll be covering several works in the topic of 3D deep learning on pointclouds for scene understanding tasks.
    First, I'll describe VoteNet (ICCV 2019, best paper nomination): a method for object detection from 3D pointclouds input, inspired by the classical generalized Hough voting technique. I'll then explain how we integrated image information into the voting scheme to further boost 3D detection (ImVoteNet, CVPR 2020). In the second part of my talk I'll describe recent studies focusing on reducing supervision for 3D scene understanding tasks, including PointContrast -- a self-supervised representation learning framework for 3D pointclods (ECCV 2020). Our findings in PointContrast are extremely encouraging: using a unified triplet of architecture, source dataset, and contrastive loss for pre-training, we achieve improvement over recent best results in segmentation and detection across 6 different benchmarks for indoor and outdoor, real and synthetic datasets -- demonstrating that the learned representation can generalize across domains.

    Lecture
  • Date:24SundayJanuary 2021

    PhD Thesis defense - Orel Mizrahi

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Zoom: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/99419142270?pwd=Wis5anpzZlZ1dXZXV2FjNGdQZjhiZz09 Meeting ID: 994 1914 2270 Password: 966778
    Lecturer
    Orel Mizrahi
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:24SundayJanuary 2021

    Exploring the potential of Angiosperm resurrection plants for food security in Africa

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    Time
    13:00 - 14:00
    Title
    SAERI - Sustainability and Energy Research Initiative seminar series
    Location
    via zoom
    Lecturer
    Prof. Jill M. Farrant
    Dept. of Molecular & Cell Biology, Uni. of Cape Town, South African Dept. of Science and Innovation & National Research Foundation South African Research Chair in Systems Biology Studies on Plant Desiccation Tolerance for Food Security. Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Cape Town, South Africa
    Organizer
    Feinberg Graduate School
    Alternative Sustainable Energy Research Initiative (AERI)
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Prof. Ron Milo zoom link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/...»
    Host: Prof. Ron Milo
    zoom link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/98356113901?pwd=V0pwa0I4M0o1RHk1Mm9VNW1jcHVDUT09
    Meeting ID: 983 5611 3901
    Password: 12345
    Lecture
  • Date:25MondayJanuary 2021

    Toward autonomous “artificial cells"

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/98063488104?pwd=N3VqTC9sU1A4RHVDZ1dhOGVxbU1iUT09
    Lecturer
    Prof. Roy Bar-Ziv
    Department of Chemical & Biological Physics, WIS
    Organizer
    Faculty of Chemistry
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about We study the assembly of programmable quasi-2D DNA compartme...»
    We study the assembly of programmable quasi-2D DNA compartments as “artificial cells” from the individual cellular level to multicellular communication. We will describe recent progress toward autonomous synthesis and assembly of cellular machines, synchrony, pattern formation, fuzzy decision-making, memory transactions, and electric field manipulation of gene expression.
    Colloquia
  • Date:25MondayJanuary 202128ThursdayJanuary 2021

    The Adaptive Brain - Inaugural Weizmann-Columbia Brain Symposium

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    Time
    16:00 - 20:30
    Location
    Zoom Webinar
    Chairperson
    Rony Paz
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:26TuesdayJanuary 2021

    SARS-CoV-2 suppresses IFNβ production, but not signaling, mediated by NSP1, 5, 6, 15, ORF6 and ORF7b

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    Time
    10:00 - 10:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer
    Dr. Maya Shemesh
    Dept. of Biomolecular Sciences-WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Type I Interferons (IFN-Is) are anti-viral response cytokine...»
    Type I Interferons (IFN-Is) are anti-viral response cytokines, and are major candidate for treatment of SARS-CoV-2. In our study we investigated the mechanism in which SARS-CoV-2 evades early stage anti-viral response by inactivation of IFN-I production. To account for different possible cellular checkpoints in which the virus may ultimately block IFN production, we applied three cellular assays: promoter activity, IFN mRNA levels, and IFNβ secretion. SARS-CoV-2 genes NSP1, NSP5, NSP6, NSP15, ORF6 and ORF7b severely disrupted IFNβ production. Conversely, individual genes and live SARS-CoV-2 infected cells failed to block Interferon stimulated gene activation in response to added IFN-I, despite an inhibition of STAT1-phosphorylation mediated by NSP1. Our findings support a multi-gene process in which SARS-CoV-2 blocks IFN-production at early stages of infection, yet infected individuals can still benefit from the anti-viral effects of added IFN-Is.
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayJanuary 2021

    SARS-CoV-2 RBD in vitro evolution follows contagious mutation spread

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    Time
    10:30 - 11:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer
    Dr. Jiri Zahradnik
    Dept. of Biomolecular Sciences-WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about SARS-CoV-2 more contagious mutations are spreading rapidly. ...»
    SARS-CoV-2 more contagious mutations are spreading rapidly. In vitro affinity maturation of the receptor-binding domain (RBD) towards ACE2, resulted in more contagious mutations, S477N, E484K, and N501Y to be among the first selected, including the British and South African variants. Plotting the binding affinity against the incidence of different RBD mutations in the population supported correlation between the two. Further in vitro evolution provides guidelines towards potentially new evolving mutations with even higher infectivity.

    For more details see Preprint: https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.01.06.425392v2
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayJanuary 2021

    Marine electrical imaging reveals novel freshwater transport mechanism in Hawaiʻi

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    Time
    11:00
    Location
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/7621438333?pwd=c0lpdlQzYSthellXWG9rZnM0ZDRFZz09
    Lecturer
    Eric Attias
    Hawaiʻi Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaiʻi
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Conventional hydrogeologic models employed to compute ocean ...»
    Conventional hydrogeologic models employed to compute ocean island sustainable yields and aquifer storage neglect the nearshore and onshore submarine environment’s complexity. However, the onshore aquifer at the island of Hawaiʻi exhibits a significant volumetric discrepancy between high-elevation freshwater recharge and coastal discharge. This study presents a novel transport mechanism of freshwater moving from onshore to onshore via a multilayer formation of water-saturated layered basalts with interbedded low-permeability layers of ash/soil, as revealed by marine-controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) imaging. We propose that this newly discovered transport mechanism of fresh water may be the governing mechanism in other volcanic islands. Additionally, our water column CSEM imaging detects multiple vertical freshwater plumes extending from the seafloor to the ocean surface. These findings provide valuable information to elucidate hydrogeologic and oceanographic rocesses affecting biogeochemical cycles in coastal waters worldwide.
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayJanuary 2021

    Viral impacts in the marine world: from single-cells to planktonic ecosystems

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    Time
    11:30 - 12:30
    Title
    Dept. Seminar via Zoom
    Location
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/92760289710?pwd=SEROejJMWUtBQU5PMGZ5Ri9Ud0hNZz09 Password: 740144
    Lecturer
    Dr. Flora Vincent
    Prof. Assaf Vardi's lab., Dept. of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Organizer
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Prof. Assaf Vardi ...»
    Host: Prof. Assaf Vardi
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayJanuary 2021

    Layers of primary visual cortex as a window into internal models about predicted and simulated environments

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    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Lecturer
    Prof. Lars Muckli
    Visual and Cognitive Neurosciences, Director of fMRI at the Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Glasgow, Scotland
    Organizer
    Department of Neurobiology
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Zoom link to join: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96608033618?p...»
    Zoom link to join:
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96608033618?pwd=SEdJUkR2ZzRBZ3laUUdGbWR1VFJTdz09

    Meeting ID: 966 0803 3618
    Password: 564068

    Host: Dr. Rita Schmidt rita.schmidt@weizmann.ac.il tel: 9070
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Normal brain function involves the interaction of internal p...»
    Normal brain function involves the interaction of internal processes with incoming sensory stimuli. We have created a series of brain imaging experiments (using 7T fMRI) that sample internal models and feedback mechanisms in early visual cortex. Primary visual cortex (V1) is the entry-stage for cortical processing of visual information. We can show that there are 3 information counter-streams concerned with: (1) retinotopic visual input, (2) top-down predictions of internal models generated by the brain, and (3) top-down imagery acting independently of the perception and prediction loop. Internal models amplify and disamplify incoming information, but there is also mental imagery not interfering with visual perception. Our results speak to the conceptual framework of predictive coding. Healthy brain function will strike a balance between the precision of prediction and prediction update based on prediction error. Our results incorporate state of the art, layer-specific ultra-high field fMRI and other imaging techniques. We argue that fMRI with its capability of measuring dendritic energy consumption is sensitive to activity in different parts of layer spanning neurons, enriching our computational understanding of counter stream brain mechanisms.

    Zoom link to join:
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96608033618?pwd=SEdJUkR2ZzRBZ3laUUdGbWR1VFJTdz09

    Meeting ID: 966 0803 3618
    Password: 564068

    Host: Dr. Rita Schmidt rita.schmidt@weizmann.ac.il tel: 9070
    Lecture
  • Date:27WednesdayJanuary 2021

    "The use of animals in drug development: challenges and opportunities"

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    Time
    11:00
    Title
    Zoom link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/99576968476?pwd=aVNtc0Q1N0ZYUk1rU3N2VlJhZ3IvQT09
    Lecturer
    Dr. Moran Grossman
    Nonclinical Safety Project Leader, Teva Pharmaceuticals.
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:27WednesdayJanuary 2021

    Machine Learning and Statistics Seminar

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:30
    Title
    Deep Learning on Structured and Geometric Data
    Lecturer
    Haggai Maron
    NVIDIA Research
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Deep Learning of structured and geometric data, such as sets...»
    Deep Learning of structured and geometric data, such as sets, graphs, and surfaces, is a prominent research direction that has received considerable attention in the last few years. Given a learning task that involves structured data, the main challenge is identifying suitable neural network architectures and understanding their theoretical and practical tradeoffs.

    This talk will focus on a popular learning setup where the learning task is invariant to a group of transformations of the input data. This setup is relevant to many popular learning tasks and data types. In the first part of the talk, I will present a general framework for designing neural network architectures based on layers that respect these transformations. In particular, I will show that these layers can be implemented using parameter-sharing schemes induced by the group. In the second part of the talk, I will demonstrate the framework’s applicability by presenting novel neural network architectures for two widely used data types: graphs and sets. I will also show that these architectures have desirable theoretical properties and that they perform well in practice.

    Lecture
  • Date:27WednesdayJanuary 2021

    Superalgebra Theory and Representations Seminar

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    Time
    18:30 - 19:45
    Title
    Bigrassmannian permutations and Verma modules
    Lecturer
    Volodymyr Mazorchuk
    Uppsala University
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of In this talk I will describe how bigrassmannian permutations...»
    In this talk I will describe how bigrassmannian permutations control the socle of the cokernel of
    embeddings of Verma modules for sl_n. An application of this is a description of the socle of the cokernel of homomorphisms between Verma modules for the periplective Lie superalgebra. This is based on two joint works: one with Hankyung Ko and Rafael Mrden and another one with Chih-Whi Chen.

    Lecture
  • Date:28ThursdayJanuary 2021

    “Low-field MRI: new perspectives”

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    Time
    09:30 - 10:30
    Lecturer
    Prof. Najat Salameh
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    The Helen and Martin Kimmel Institute for Magnetic Resonance
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Zoom: Link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/98957854014?pwd=ZTEya...»
    Zoom: Link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/98957854014?pwd=ZTEyazd6cThxUE90L3ZJbkdkbkFWQT09
    passcode: 159170









    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-ionizing, non-invasive imaging modality that has become key in modern medicine. Its high value resides in a broad range of soft tissue contrasts or biomarkers that can be tuned to enable the identification and follow-up of many pathophysiological or metabolic processes. Such developments were made possible thanks to almost forty years of hardware and software development, yet access to MRI nowadays remains exclusive, bound to radiology suites in hospitals, and restricted to less than half of the world population. This limited accessibility is mostly due to its one-fits-all design and its prerequisites for intense magnetic field strength that impact cost, siting infrastructure, and clinical compatibility. One way to improve accessibility in MRI is to lower the magnetic field strength that will naturally influence cost, siting, and compatibility. Further, lowering the field strength can translate in smaller footprint designs which geometry and contrast could purposely be tuned to certain targeted applications. Indeed, relaxation mechanisms are known to change with the surrounding magnetic field, with larger T1 dispersion at low field that have for the most part been unexplored.
    Although very promising, many challenges arise linked to the lower intrinsic nuclear spin polarization inherent to low field technologies, calling for original and innovative approaches to reach clinical relevance. During this seminar, Prof. Najat Salameh will describe those challenges and possible solutions by presenting the current landscape of low field imaging and recent progress made at the Center for Adaptable MRI Technology, Basel University.
    Lecture
  • Date:28ThursdayJanuary 2021

    Studying resistance in cancer

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Lecturer
    Prof. Getz Gad
    Broad Institute, MGH Cancer Center
    Organizer
    Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Cancer Research Club
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2...»
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Lecture
  • Date:31SundayJanuary 202104ThursdayFebruary 2021

    Induced topological states and phases in quantum matter

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Chairperson
    Haim Beidenkopf
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:31SundayJanuary 2021

    Live imaging of chromatin distribution reveals novel principles of nuclear architecture and chromatin compartmentalization”.

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Lecturer
    Prof. Talila Volk
    Dept. Molecular Genetics, WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Soft Matter and Biomaterials
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Zoom Link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/91657907719?pwd=M2...»
    Zoom Link:

    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/91657907719?pwd=M2F2WlRKWGRuUHlxN0tNWFhZVUVzZz09



    The genetic material of live organisms is packed and stored within the nucleus. It contains DNA wrapped around the nucleosomes, which then organized into chromatin fibers that partition into distinct compartments, which eventually fill the entire nucleus. Chromatin three dimensional topology is essential for proper accessibility of transcription factors, which control tissue-specific gene expression programs. Whereas chromatin partition into specific domains has been described in cells in culture conditions, information regarding chromatin 3 dimensional distribution in tissues within live organisms is still missing. We have imaged the chromatin in muscle fibers of live, intact Drosophila larvae, and revealed its 3 dimensional structure. Our results demonstrate novel 3 dimensional architecture of the chromatin which is evolutionary conserved, and has important implications on the regulation of gene expression.
    Lecture
  • Date:31SundayJanuary 2021

    Simulating Chemistry from Atoms to Devices: Next-Generation Reactive Molecular Dynamics

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Lecturer
    Dr. David Furman
    Dept. Chemistry, University of Cambridge
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Zoom Link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/97142508810?pwd=S2...»
    Zoom Link:
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/97142508810?pwd=S2Voc3BMYnh6RmFTYUxLbUFjQXRGZz09






    Until recently, computational studies of chemical reactivity were exclusively dealt with using quantum mechanical approaches, which severely limited the system's size and accessible time scales for simulation.
    To bypass the need to solve Schrodinger's equation, and facilitate large-scale simulations for up to millions of atoms, both accurate and efficient models of the chemical bond have to be constructed.
    I will present recent advances in the field of modeling chemical reactions in large-scale, complex systems (i.e. "dirty chemistry"), with a particular focus on ReaxFF reactive molecular dynamics.
    Prominent applications from recent years will be highlighted, including: (a) discovery of the underlying operation principles of a novel laser-based mass-spectrometry technique,
    and (b) prediction of the surprising chemistry that leads to the formation of several key precursors to biomolecules of life upon the collapse of a "primordial bubble".
    Finally, I will present a new ReaxFF formulation that opens exciting new avenues for orders of magnitude more accurate simulations for long time scales.

    Lecture
  • Date:02TuesdayFebruary 2021

    Adventures in the Critical Zone: from carbon fluxes to wildfires

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    Time
    10:00
    Location
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/7621438333?pwd=c0lpdlQzYSthellXWG9rZnM0ZDRFZz09
    Lecturer
    Antonello Provenzale
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The Hadley circulation is a key element of the climate syste...»
    The Hadley circulation is a key element of the climate system. It is traditionally defined as the zonally averaged meridional circulation in the tropics, therefore treated as a zonally symmetric phenomenon. However, differences in temperature between land and sea cause zonal asymmetries on Earth, dramatically affecting the circulation. This longitudinal dependence of the meridional circulation evokes questions about where and when the actual large scale tropical circulation occurs. Here, we look into the connection between the longitudinally dependent meridional circulation, and the actual large scale transport of air in the tropics using a coupled Eulerian and Lagrangian approach. Decomposing the velocity field into rotational and divergent components, we identify how each component affects the actual circulation. We propose an alternative definition for the circulation, that describes the actual path of air parcels in the tropics, as a tropical atmospheric conveyor belt. We further investigate this definition, analyzing the circulation under climate change and its effect on precipitation changes. We show that in order to predict future climate, the regionality and three-dimensionality of the large-scale tropical circulation must be taken into account. We find that the changes in the circulation vary significantly over longitude, and are overlooked when analyzing the zonally averaged meridional circulation. The circulation is strengthening and expanding in the center of the Pacific, a region where the circulation barely existed in past. On the other hand, the circulation is weakening in the Indo-Pacific region, where it was the most significant in the past. These differences appear as a shift in the region of ascent of the conveyor belt, that is revealed when analyzing the decomposed vertical wind. The pattern of weakening of the ascent in the Indo-Pacific and strengthening in the center of the Pacific explains the projected changes in precipitation. The Indo-Pacific region is drying, while the precipitation in the center of the Pacific is intensifying.
    Lecture
  • Date:04ThursdayFebruary 2021

    Targeted protein degradation for the treatment of cancer

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Lecturer
    Benjamin Ebert, MD, PhD
    Chair for the Department of Medical Oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston.
    Organizer
    Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Cancer Research Club
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2...»
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Lecture

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