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  • Date:07TuesdayFebruary 2023

    iSCAR seminar

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    Time
    09:00
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Hellmut Augustin
    Organizer
    Department of Immunology and Regenerative Biology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:07TuesdayFebruary 2023

    Antimicrobial Peptides against Multidrug-Resistant Biofilm from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

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    Time
    10:00 - 11:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Cafeteria
    Lecturer
    Daniel Ben Hur
    Dept. of Biomolecular Sciences-WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:07TuesdayFebruary 2023

    From Spin Materials to Electron Transfer Catalysis

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Prof. Swadhin K Mandal
    Department of Chemical Sciences, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Kolkata
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The major concerns about industrially used catalytic systems...»
    The major concerns about industrially used catalytic systems today are: i) the high cost of catalysts; ii) the toxicity of heavy transition metals; iii) difficulties in removing trace amounts of toxic-metal residues from the desired product; and, finally, iv) rare transition metal depletion, which does not meet the requirement of sustainable development. Developing environmentally friendly catalysts is an excellent option in this regard. Naturally, the most recent catalyst development trend heralded a new era of metal-free catalysis or catalysts based on earth-abundant, nontoxic, and low-cost metals. This talk will go over our recent advances [1-4] in using small molecules to systematically mimic transition metal-based catalysis. We designed electron transfer catalysis using the smallest polycyclic odd alternant hydrocarbon, phenalenyl (PLY)-based molecules, which was inspired by a completely different field of molecular spin materials [5]. This talk will focus on how to avoid transition metals when performing various cross-coupling catalysis.
    Lecture
  • Date:07TuesdayFebruary 2023

    The pyrenoid: a liquid-liquid phase separated CO2 fixing organelle

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    Time
    11:30 - 12:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Luke Mackinder
    University of York
    Organizer
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Dr. Assaf Gal...»
    Host: Dr. Assaf Gal
    Lecture
  • Date:07TuesdayFebruary 2023

    Mapping brainstem nuclei structure and connectivity in health and disease 

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    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Dr. Marta Bianciardi
    Radiology, Harvard Medical School Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, MGH
    Organizer
    Department of Brain Sciences
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Dr. Michal Ramot michal.ramot@weizmann.ac.il For ac...»
    Host: Dr. Michal Ramot michal.ramot@weizmann.ac.il

    For accessibility issues contact:naomi.moses@weizmann.ac.il
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Brainstem nuclei in humans play a crucial role in vital func...»
    Brainstem nuclei in humans play a crucial role in vital functions, such as arousal, autonomic homeostasis, sensory and motor relay, nociception, and sleep and have been implicated in a vast array of brain pathologies, including disorders of consciousness, sleep disorders, autonomic disorders, pain, Parkinson’s disease and other motor disorders. Yet, an in vivo delineation of most human brainstem nuclei location and connectivity using conventional imaging has been elusive because of limited sensitivity and contrast for detecting these small regions using standard neuroimaging methods. In this talk, Dr. Bianciardi will present the probabilistic atlas and connectome of 31 brainstem nuclei of the arousal, motor, autonomic and sensory systems developed by her team in healthy living humans using structural, functional and diffusion-based MRI at 7 Tesla. She will also show the translatability of 7 Tesla connectivity results to conventional 3 Tesla imaging. Dr Bianciardi will conclude her seminar by presenting the first translational application of the brainstem nuclei atlas to investigate arousal and motor mechanisms in traumatic coma and premanifest synucleinopathy.
    Lecture
  • Date:09ThursdayFebruary 2023

    Seminar for PhD Thesis Defense

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    Time
    09:30
    Title
    “Mapping functional components of viral infection”
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Yaara Finkel
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:09ThursdayFebruary 2023

    Seminar for thesis defense with Yaara Finkel

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    Time
    09:30 - 10:30
    Title
    Mapping functional components of viral infection
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Yaara Finkel
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:09ThursdayFebruary 2023

    “EPR and low-field DNP with arbitrary waveform excitation”

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    Time
    09:30 - 10:30
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Dr Nino Wili
    Dpet Chemistry, Aarhus University
    Organizer
    The Helen and Martin Kimmel Institute for Magnetic Resonance Research
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Until recently, pulse EPR was based solely on rectangular pu...»
    Until recently, pulse EPR was based solely on rectangular pulses. This changed with the introduction
    of fast arbitrary waveform generators (AWG) that allow for pulse shaping and phase/frequency modulation at microwave frequencies. Early applications of this technology focused mainly on chirp pulses for broadband excitation and inversion within existing pulse sequences.
    In this talk, I will focus on Dynamic Nuclear Polarization with modulated pulse sequences in static solids.
    The theoretical description shows remarkable similarities with dipolar recoupling sequences in magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR. In dipolar recoupling, the pulse sequence interferes with the time-dependence of interactions due to the sample spinning. A similar phenomenon takes place in pulsed DNP, where the pulses interfere with the rotation in spin space due to the nuclear Zeeman interaction.
    After introducing the theoretical background, I will show results at 0.35 T/15 MHz/9.5 GHz. I will then discuss the implications for pulsed DNP at higher magnetic fields. Finally, I show and propose experiments to make use of DNP within the context of pulse EPR, i.e. for detecting hyperfine coupled nuclei in the vicinity of unpaired electrons
    Lecture
  • Date:09ThursdayFebruary 2023

    Vision and AI

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    Time
    12:15 - 13:15
    Title
    The implicit bias of SGD: A Minima stability analysis
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 1
    Lecturer
    Tomer Michaeli
    Technion
    Organizer
    Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Seminar
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about One of the puzzling phenomena in deep learning, is that neur...»
    One of the puzzling phenomena in deep learning, is that neural networks tend to generalize well even when they are highly overparameterized. Recent works linked this behavior with implicit biases of the algorithms used to train networks (like SGD). Here we analyze the implicit bias of SGD from the standpoint of minima stability, focusing on shallow ReLU networks trained with a quadratic loss. Specifically, it is known that SGD can stably converge only to minima that are flat enough w.r.t. its step size. Here we show that this property enforces the predictor function to become smoother as the step size increases, thus significantly regularizing the solution. Furthermore, we analyze the representation power of stable solutions. Particularly, we prove a depth-separation result: There exist functions that cannot be approximated by depth-2 networks corresponding to stable minima, no matter how small the step size is taken to be, but which can be implemented with depth-3 networks corresponding to stable minima. We show how our theoretical findings explain behaviors observed in practical settings.
    (Joint works with Rotem Mulayoff, Mor Shpigel Nacson, Greg Ongie, Daniel Soudry).
    Lecture
  • Date:09ThursdayFebruary 2023

    Machine Learning and Statistics Seminar

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    Time
    12:15 - 13:15
    Title
    The implicit bias of SGD: A Minima stability analysis
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 1
    Lecturer
    Tomer Michaeli
    Technion
    Organizer
    Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Seminar
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about One of the puzzling phenomena in deep learning, is that neur...»
    One of the puzzling phenomena in deep learning, is that neural networks tend to generalize well even when they are highly overparameterized. Recent works linked this behavior with implicit biases of the algorithms used to train networks (like SGD). Here we analyze the implicit bias of SGD from the standpoint of minima stability, focusing on shallow ReLU networks trained with a quadratic loss. Specifically, it is known that SGD can stably converge only to minima that are flat enough w.r.t. its step size. Here we show that this property enforces the predictor function to become smoother as the step size increases, thus significantly regularizing the solution. Furthermore, we analyze the representation power of stable solutions. Particularly, we prove a depth-separation result: There exist functions that cannot be approximated by depth-2 networks corresponding to stable minima, no matter how small the step size is taken to be, but which can be implemented with depth-3 networks corresponding to stable minima. We show how our theoretical findings explain behaviors observed in practical settings.
    (Joint works with Rotem Mulayoff, Mor Shpigel Nacson, Greg Ongie, Daniel Soudry).
    Lecture
  • Date:09ThursdayFebruary 2023

    What can radiocarbon dating tell us about the diagenesis of tooth enamel?

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    Time
    13:30
    Location
    Room 590, Benoziyo Building for Biological Science, Weizmann Institute of Science
    Lecturer
    Dr. Rachel Wood
    Oxford Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit, School of Archaeology, Oxford, UK
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Please follow the link or Zoom ID to join remotely. Join Zo...»
    Please follow the link or Zoom ID to join remotely.
    Join Zoom Meeting:
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/4845901524?pwd=dkYybWIvTXVSaW40YmF2TEVxVFg0UT09

    Meeting ID: 484 590 1524
    Meeting password: 045940
    Lecture
  • Date:09ThursdayFebruary 2023

    Genetic and Epigenetic Drivers of Melanoma Formation and Progression

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Marcus Bosenberg, MD, PhD
    Anthony N. Brady Professor of Dermatology, Pathology, and Immunobiology Director, Yale Center for Immuno-Oncology Director, Yale SPORE in Skin Cancer Director, Center for Precision Cancer Modeling Co-Leader, Cancer Immunology Program Yale University
    Organizer
    Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Cancer Research Club
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6K...»
    Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09


    Lecture
  • Date:09ThursdayFebruary 2023

    Some like it hot - the effect of future warming on calcifying organisms

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/93009427308?pwd=NjBRVUxvank2cWRzT0U2NXFVMDFjdz09
    Lecturer
    Dr. Danna Teitelboim
    University of Oxford
    Organizer
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Dr. David Zeevi...»
    Host: Dr. David Zeevi
    Lecture
  • Date:12SundayFebruary 2023

    “Life at Interfaces- Challenges and Opportunities in the Miniaturization of Bioinspired Robots”

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Dr. Bat-El Pinchasik
    School of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, TAU
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:12SundayFebruary 2023

    Understanding nutritional impact on bone development and quality

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    Time
    15:00 - 16:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Efrat Monsonego Ornan
    Institute of Biochemistry and Nutrition The Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
    Organizer
    Life Sciences
    Metabollic Research Forum
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:13MondayFebruary 202315WednesdayFebruary 2023

    New approaches to early embryogenesis & epigenetics

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    The David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Chairperson
    Yonatan Stelzer
    Organizer
    The Aharon Katzir-Katchalsky Center , The Helen and Martin Kimmel Institute for Stem Cell Research
    Homepage
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:13MondayFebruary 2023

    TBD

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:15
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Prof. Jacob Sagiv
    Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science Department
    Organizer
    Faculty of Chemistry
    Homepage
    Contact
    Colloquia
  • Date:14TuesdayFebruary 2023

    Photoinduced regioselective functionalization of arenes at proximal and distal sites

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Prof. Debabrata Maiti
    Department of Chemistry & IDP in Climate Studies, IIT Bombay
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Over years’ transition metal-catalyzed C-H activation has pr...»
    Over years’ transition metal-catalyzed C-H activation has propelled the field of organic synthesis for the construction of structurally complex and diverse molecules in resource-economical fashion. In this context, non-directed C-H activation has gained unprecedented attention for attaining region-specific C-H functionalizations in a step-economic mode. Unlike traditional Fujiwara-Moritani reaction, this approach relies on ligand assistance and thus uses arene as the limiting reagent. However, all existing non-directed C-H functionalizations utilize high thermal energy to induce the functional group which eventually put the regioselectivity at stake. In addition, use of super stoichiometric costly silver salts to regenerate the catalyst produces unwanted metal waste. In aid of developing a more sustainable and environmentally benign approach, we have established a photoredox catalytic system by a merger of palladium/organo-photocatalyst(PC) which forges highly regeiospecific C-H olefination of diverse arenes and heteroarenes. Visible light nullifies the requirement of silver salts and thermal energy in executing “region-resolved” Fujiwara-Moritani reaction.
    Lecture
  • Date:14TuesdayFebruary 2023

    Dynamics of adaptive variation generation and maintenance under very prolonged resource exhaustion

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    Time
    11:30 - 12:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Ruth Hershberg
    Faculty of Medicine, Technion
    Organizer
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Dr. David Zeevi...»
    Host: Dr. David Zeevi
    Lecture
  • Date:15WednesdayFebruary 2023

    Special Guest Seminar

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Tomer Itkin
    Transcriptional Regulation of Hemato-Vascular Cell Fate Plasticity
    Organizer
    Department of Immunology and Regenerative Biology
    Contact
    Lecture

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