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  • Date:19SundayJanuary 202020MondayJanuary 2020

    Brain Health Molecules Mechanisms and Disease

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Chairperson
    Oren Schuldiner
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  • Date:19SundayJanuary 2020

    Guest seminar- Dr. Livnat Jerby-Arnon, will lecture on "Dissecting immune evasion mechanisms in cancer using single-cell technologies”

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    Time
    10:00 - 11:00
    Location
    Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Auditorium
    Organizer
    Department of Immunology
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    Lecture
  • Date:19SundayJanuary 2020

    Soil Spectroscopy throughout the Years: Availabilities and Capabilities

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    Time
    11:00
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Eyal Ben-Dor
    Department of Geography Porter School of Environment and Earth Sciences Faculty of Exact Sciences Tel Aviv University Israel
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The soil spectroscopy discipline has been progressed over th...»
    The soil spectroscopy discipline has been progressed over the past two decades quite remarkably. Many portable point spectrometers became available through that time where recently also image spectrometers have become quite popular. The technology was used in the laboratory, field, and airborne levels and provided a new capability for a rapid and quantitative view of a large number of samples. At the same time platforms were also developed to carry the new family of sensors for remote sensing applications of large areas using ground and airborne vehicles ( manned and un-manned) and recently even satellites. This progress has led to a large number of activities in exploiting the spectroscopy for many applications within the soil science discipline. As the data acquisition increases and the soil spectral database has been enlarged, a new technique to compile soil spectral database together with methods to effectively analyze them has also been developed. To that end, activities to deal with the data mining process using big databases were successfully adopted from other disciplines while also designed especially for the soil spectroscopy activity. The results demonstrated that soil spectroscopy could be used for many applications from different domains such as soil mapping, precision agriculture, and laboratory work and can progress the soil science discipline quite forward. In this talk, we will review the history of soil spectroscopy from the first spectrometer and platform to the present situation. A particular emphasis will be given to the recent applications that have been developed in our group and to the future capability of this critical technology from all perspectives and to the new horizon it may open as expressed by space agencies such as NASA, ESA, ASI, JAXA, ISA and DLR.

    Lecture
  • Date:19SundayJanuary 2020

    Faculty Seminar

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    Time
    11:15 - 13:00
    Title
    Verification of distributed protocols using decidable logics
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 155
    Lecturer
    Oded Padon
    Stanford University
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Seminar, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Seminar, Department of Mathematics
    Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Formal verification of infinite-state systems, and distribut...»
    Formal verification of infinite-state systems, and distributed systems in particular, is a long standing research goal. I will describe a series of works that develop a methodology for verifying distributed algorithms and systems using decidable logics, employing decomposition, abstraction, and user interaction. This methodology is implemented in an open-source tool, and has resulted in the first mechanized proofs of several important distributed protocols. I will also describe a novel approach to the problem of invariant inference based on a newly formalized duality between reachability and mathematical induction. The duality leads to a primal-dual search algorithm, and a prototype implementation already handles challenging examples that other state-of-the-art techniques cannot handle. I will briefly describe several other works, including a new optimization technique for deep learning computations that achieves significant speedups relative to existing deep learning frameworks.
    Lecture
  • Date:19SundayJanuary 2020

    PhD Thesis Defense - Brainstem encoding of active sensing in the vibrissal system

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    Time
    11:30
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Coralie Ebert (PhD Thesis Defense)
    Prof. Ehud Ahissar Lab Dept of Neurobiology, WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Neurobiology
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of For assistance with accessibility issues, please contact nao...»
    For assistance with accessibility issues, please contact naomi.moses@weizmann.ac.il

    AbstractShow full text abstract about Perception is an active process, requiring the integration o...»
    Perception is an active process, requiring the integration of both proprioceptive and exteroceptive information. In the rat’s vibrissal system, a classical model for the study of active sensing, previous works explored the relative contribution of the two information streams at the peripheral, thalamic and cortical levels. However, this issue was never addressed in the brainstem, and was only indirectly inferred from its thalamic projections. The current work addressed this gap in our knowledge by performing the first comparative study of the encoding of whisking and touch signals in the oralis, interpolaris and paratrigeminal nuclei. We also examined possible mechanisms for TIPs (Touch Induced Pumps) generation, a touch reflexive behavior mediated by the brainstem. By combining induction of artificial TIPs in anesthetized animals and computational models, we showed that passive retraction of the whisker pad is the most plausible mechanism for TIPs generation. Overall, our findings bridge a critical gap in our knowledge of the vibrissal system, providing the first characterization of responses to active touch in the trigeminal brainstem, the first evidence that the paratrigeminal nucleus is involved in the processing of vibrissal information and a novel mechanism for TIPs generation.
    Lecture
  • Date:19SundayJanuary 2020

    Departmental Seminar - Molecular Genetics Dept.

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    Time
    13:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:19SundayJanuary 2020

    Shade maps for prioritizing municipal microclimatic action in hot climates

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    Time
    13:00 - 14:00
    Title
    SAERI seminar serirs - Sustainability and Energy Research Initiative
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Room 690
    Lecturer
    Prof. Or Aleksandrowicz
    Faculty of Architecture and Town Planning Technion - Israel Institute of Technology
    Organizer
    Feinberg Graduate School
    Alternative Sustainable Energy Research Initiative (AERI)
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Prof. Ron Milo Light refreshments will be served at 1...»
    Host: Prof. Ron Milo
    Light refreshments will be served at 12:40
    Lecture
  • Date:19SundayJanuary 2020

    The reference map technique for simulating complex materials and

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    Time
    13:15
    Location
    Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Drory Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Christopher Rycroft
    Harvard
    Organizer
    Department of Physics of Complex Systems
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about > Conventional computational methods often create a dilem...»
    > Conventional computational methods often create a dilemma for fluid–structure interaction problems. Typically, solids are simulated using a Lagrangian approach with grid that moves with the material, whereas fluids are simulated using an Eulerian approach with a fixed spatial grid, requiring some type of interfacial coupling between the two different perspectives. Here, a fully Eulerian method for simulating structures immersed in a fluid will be presented. By introducing a reference map variable to model finite-deformation constitutive relations in the structures on the same grid as the fluid, the interfacial coupling problem is highly simplified. The method is particularly well suited for simulating soft, highly-deformable materials and many-body contact problems, and several examples will be presented. This is joint work with Ken Kamrin (MIT).
    Lecture
  • Date:19SundayJanuary 2020

    Computer Science Seminar

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    Time
    13:30 - 15:00
    Title
    Learning vs. Verifying
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 155
    Lecturer
    Jonathan Shafer
    UC Berkeley
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of This talk will address...»
    This talk will address
    Lecture
  • Date:20MondayJanuary 2020

    Foundations of Computer Science Colloquium

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    Time
    11:15 - 13:00
    Title
    A New Analysis of Differential Privacy’s Generalization Guarantees
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 155
    Lecturer
    Katrina Ligett
    Hebrew University
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Many data analysis pipelines are adaptive: the choice of whi...»
    Many data analysis pipelines are adaptive: the choice of which analysis to run next depends on the outcome of previous analyses. Common examples include variable selection for regression problems and hyper-parameter optimization in large-scale machine learning problems: in both cases, common practice involves repeatedly evaluating a series of models on the same dataset. Unfortunately, this kind of adaptive re-use of data invalidates many traditional methods of avoiding over-fitting and false discovery, and has been blamed in part for the recent flood of non-reproducible findings in the empirical sciences. An exciting line of work beginning with Dwork et al. 2015 establishes the first formal model and first algorithmic results providing a general approach to mitigating the harms of adaptivity, via a connection to the notion of differential privacy. Unfortunately, until now, those results were primarily of information theoretic interest, only beating out the simple approach of gathering fresh data for every computation ("sample-splitting") at the scale of many millions of datapoints.

    In this work, we give a new proof of the transfer theorem that any mechanism for answering adaptively chosen statistical queries that is differentially private and sample-accurate is also accurate out-of-sample. Our new proof is elementary and gives structural insights that we expect will be useful elsewhere. We show: 1) that differential privacy ensures that the expectation of any query on the conditional distribution on datasets induced by the transcript of the interaction is close to its expectation on the data distribution, and 2) sample accuracy on its own ensures that any query answer produced by the mechanism is close to the expectation of the query on the conditional distribution. This second claim follows from a thought experiment in which we imagine that the dataset is resampled from the conditional distribution after the mechanism has committed to its answers. The transfer theorem then follows by summing these two bounds, and in particular, avoids the "monitor argument" used to derive high probability bounds in prior work.

    An upshot of our new proof technique is that the concrete bounds we obtain are substantially better than the best previously known bounds, even though the improvements are in the constants, rather than the asymptotics (which are known to be tight). As we show, our new bounds outperform the naive "sample-splitting" baseline at dramatically smaller dataset sizes compared to the previous state of the art, bringing techniques from this literature closer to practicality.

    Joint work with: Christopher Jung, Seth Neel, Aaron Roth, Saeed Sharifi-Malvajerdi (UPenn), and Moshe Shenfeld (HUJI).

    This work appeared at ITCS 2020.
    Lecture
  • Date:20MondayJanuary 2020

    IMM Guest seminar-Dr. Adi Barzel, will lecture on “Therapeutic Gene Targeting With or Without Nucleases.“

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    Time
    13:00 - 14:00
    Location
    Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Adi Barzel
    Dr. Adi Barzel is President of the Israeli Society of Gene and Cell Therapy and a senior lecturer in the Department of Biochemistry at Tel Aviv University. Dr. Barzel is a co-founder of LogicBio Therapeutics (NASDAQ: LOGC), a public gene therapy company developing transformational medicines for children with devastating disorders. He is also the chair of the international conference on lymphocyte engineering. Dr. Barzel is an expert in homologous recombination and gene targeting. He is a Summa cum Laude graduate of the Adi Lautman interdisciplinary program for outstanding students. He has earned his Ph.D. in genetics from the laboratory of Professor Martin Kupiec at Tel Aviv University and was subsequently a postdoctoral fellow at the Mark Kay lab at Stanford University.
    Organizer
    Department of Immunology
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    Lecture
  • Date:20MondayJanuary 2020

    Self-assembled Electrolytes: Conserved media with non-equilibrium properties and why should we care about it?

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    Time
    14:15
    Location
    Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Room A
    Lecturer
    Arik Yochelis, BGU
    Organizer
    Department of Physics of Complex Systems
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Self-assembly driven by phase separation coupled to Coulombi...»
    Self-assembly driven by phase separation coupled to Coulombic interactions is fundamental to a wide range of applications, examples of which include soft matter lithography via di-block copolymers, membrane design using poly-electrolytes, and renewable energy applications based on complex nano-materials, such as ionic liquids. I will show by using two continuum case models, ionic liquids and charged polymers, that although self-assembly in electrolytes is a gradient flow system, it surprisingly displays several fundamental features that are related to far from equilibrium (reaction-diffusion) systems and thus, allow for novel realizations, interpretations, and applications to concentrated electrolytes.
    Lecture
  • Date:21TuesdayJanuary 2020

    What will we eat tomorrow ? Food security in the 21st century

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    Time
    10:00 - 10:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Cafeteria
    Lecturer
    Moshe Goldsmith
    Dept. of Biomolecular Sciences-WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The world’s population is expected to grow by 25% in the nex...»
    The world’s population is expected to grow by 25% in the next 30 years, reaching 9.6 billion by 2050. In order to feed such a large population, there is a global need to increase food production from crops alone by 56%. In addition, global warming is expected to reduce crop yields in low and middle latitude areas and to increase climate instability. A partial solution can be found by transitioning to more resilient and nutritious food crops such as millets and legumes. However, some of these crops contain toxic compounds that pose a health risk if consumed at high amounts. Here we present our attempts to identify and eliminate such a plant toxin in order to produce a cultivar that is safe for large scale consumption.
    Lecture
  • Date:21TuesdayJanuary 2020

    Cancer-associated fibroblast compositions change with breast-cancer progression and correlate with clinical outcome

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    Time
    10:30 - 11:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Cafeteria
    Lecturer
    Gil Friedman
    Dept. of Biomolecular Sciences-WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are non-malignant tumor...»
    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are non-malignant tumor-supporting cells, which are highly abundant in the majority of carcinomas, and carry out distinct cancer related functions. The wide range of CAF activities suggests that CAFs are heterogenous and dynamically change. We analyzed CAFs using index and transcriptional single-cell sorting, at several time-points along breast tumor progression in mice, uncovering distinct subpopulations with transitioning transcriptional programs. We have further stained and analyzed sections of human breast tumors, and found that the two main CAF subpopulations are also present in human breast cancer, and that their ratio is associated with disease outcome
    Lecture
  • Date:21TuesdayJanuary 2020

    PhD defense presentation by Lihi Radomir (Shachar Lab)

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    Time
    10:30 - 12:30
    Title
    “SLAM receptors in maintenance of B cells in health and autoimmunity.”
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Lihi Radomir
    Organizer
    Department of Immunology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:21TuesdayJanuary 2020

    Towards Advanced Materials: From Unique Peptidomimetics to High-Performance Thermosets

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Dr. Revital Kaminker
    UC Santa Barbara
    Organizer
    Department of Organic Chemistry
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about High-performance materials with elevated operating temperatu...»
    High-performance materials with elevated operating temperatures and robust mechanical properties, are essential for a wide variety of emerging applications, such as in functional adhesives, automobiles, aerospace, and coatings. Polyhexahydrotriazines (PHT) are new promising high-performance thermosets exhibiting enhanced thermal and mechanical properties.1 The performance and utility of PHT-based materials is further enhanced by the ability to design new material properties based on changes in the molecular structure.2 We demonstrated a new solvent-free approach for the fabrication of PHT based on low-melting-point diamines enabling the production of adhesives with comparable properties to well-established epoxy adhesives. Furthermore, these versatile materials could be degraded at different rates in acidic conditions based on the nature of the starting diamine molecular structure. Controlling the degradation is extremely valuable in composites and adhesives in order to be able to recycle and rework the materials.
    In the second part of my talk I will show how the ability to control and adapt peptide conformation is crucial for the rational design and control of their function.3,4 We demonstrated by end-to-end distance measurements using Double Electron-Electron Resonance (DEER) EPR method that we can tune the conformations of the backbone while maintaining the sequence of the side-chains. Interestingly, tuning of the backbone has an effect on peptide propensity to aggregate or stabilize nanoparticles. Such knowledge is critical for designing new materials for various biotechnological applications.
    1. J. M. García, G. O. Jones, K. Virwani, B. D. McCloskey, D. J. Boday, G. M. ter Huurne, H. W. Horn, D. J. Coady, A. M. Bintaleb, A. M. S. Alabdulrahman, F. Alsewailem, H. A. A. Almegren, J. L. Hedrick. Science 2014, 344, 732–735.
    2. R. Kaminker, E. B. Callaway, N. D. Dolinski, S. M. Barbon, M. Shibata, H. Wang, J. Hu, C. J. Hawker. Solvent-Free Synthesis of High-Performance Polyhexahydrotriazine (PHT) Thermosets. Chem. Mater. 2018, 30, 8352–8358.
    3. R. Kaminker, I. Kaminker, W. R. Gutekunst, Y. Luo, S.-H. Lee, J. Niu, C. J. Hawker, S. Han. Tuning Conformation and Properties of Peptidomimetic Backbones through Dual N/Cα-Substitution. Chem. Commun. 2018, 54, 5237–5240.
    4. R. Kaminker, A. Anastasaki, W. R. Gutekunst, Y. Luo, S.-H. Lee, C. J. Hawker. Tuning of Protease Resistance in Oligopeptides through N-alkylation. Chem. Commun. 2018, 54, 9631–9634.
    Lecture
  • Date:21TuesdayJanuary 2020

    Direct oxidant sensing and signaling pathways in photosynthesis and in hypoxia in animals

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    Time
    11:30 - 12:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Avihai Danon
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Dr. Cathy Bessudo...»
    Host: Dr. Cathy Bessudo
    Lecture
  • Date:21TuesdayJanuary 2020

    Prof. Ron Milo - Who weighs more? The global census of nature

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    Time
    12:00
    Title
    Who weighs more? The global census of nature
    Location
    Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Ron Milo
    Organizer
    Department of Media Relations
    Homepage
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of The lecture is in Hebrew...»
    The lecture is in Hebrew
    Lecture
  • Date:21TuesdayJanuary 2020

    Visualizing activity dependent signaling dynamics in intact neuronal circuits

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    Time
    12:30
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Dr. Tal Laviv
    Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience
    Organizer
    Department of Neurobiology
    Joint Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Joint Seminar-Depts of Neurobiology & Biomolecular Scien...»
    Joint Seminar-Depts of Neurobiology & Biomolecular Sciences

    Hosts:
    Prof. Rony Paz rony.paz@weizmann.ac.il tel: 6216 (Neurobiology)
    Prof. Rivka Dikstein rivka.dikstein@weizmann.ac.il tel: 2117 (Biomolecular Sciences)

    For assistance with accessibility issues, please contact naomi.moses@weizmann.ac.il
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Sensory experience can change the structure and function...»


    Sensory experience can change the structure and function of neurons in the brain over a wide range of timescales, from milliseconds-second modulation of synaptic activity to long-lasting alterations of genetic programs, lasting minutes to hours. While conversion of synaptic activity into long-lasting nuclear signaling is vital for learning and neuronal development, we still lack a clear understanding of its basic operating principles. To address this, I will describe recent advancements using two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging and new biosensors which allowed us to image the activity of CREB, an activity-dependent transcription factor important for synaptic plasticity, at single cell resolution in awake mice. Simultaneous imaging of CREB and Ca2+ in the visual cortex permitted us to explore how sensory deprivation (dark-rearing) can modulate the sensitivity and duration of CREB activity to sensory-evoked Ca2+ elevations. Future work using this approach will allow us to unravel synapse to nucleus signaling dynamics underlying experience-dependent plasticity in the brain.
    Lecture
  • Date:21TuesdayJanuary 2020

    Visualizing activity dependent signaling dynamics in intact neuronal circuits

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    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Title
    Joint Seminar - Dept. of Neurobiology & Biomolecular Sciences
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Tal Laviv - Joint Seminar - Dept. of Neurobiology & Biomolecular Sciences
    Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Joint Seminar
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Sensory experience can change the structure and function of ...»
    Sensory experience can change the structure and function of neurons in the brain over a wide range of timescales, from milliseconds-second modulation of synaptic activity to long-lasting alterations of genetic programs, lasting minutes to hours. While conversion of synaptic activity into long-lasting nuclear signaling is vital for learning and neuronal development, we still lack a clear understanding of its basic operating principles. To address this, I will describe recent advancements using two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging and new biosensors which allowed us to image the activity of CREB, an activity-dependent transcription factor important for synaptic plasticity, at single cell resolution in awake mice. Simultaneous imaging of CREB and Ca2+ in the visual cortex permitted us to explore how sensory deprivation (dark-rearing) can modulate the sensitivity and duration of CREB activity to sensory-evoked Ca2+ elevations. Future work using this approach will allow us to unravel synapse to nucleus signaling dynamics underlying experience-dependent plasticity in the brain.
    Lecture

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