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  • Date:18TuesdayJune 2019

    RNASEQ Predicts Major Breast Cancer Subtype and Potential to Respond to Cancer Immunotherapy.

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    Time
    10:00 - 10:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Daniel Harari
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences-WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Breast cancer (BC) divides into three major subtypes. 1) Es...»
    Breast cancer (BC) divides into three major subtypes. 1) Estrogen/Progesterone Receptor positive (ER+ve), 2) ErbB2/Her2 genome amplified (Her2+), and for cancers exhibiting none of these markers, triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). These classifications defined by histo-pathologists have important ramifications as they indicate alternative therapy options best suited to treat a given patient.
    We have used high throughput transcriptomic data from > 1000 breast cancer biopsies derived from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and demonstrate that RNASEQ can with high fidelity subcategorize BC into one of these three major subgroups. Surprisingly, we found that three levels of ErbB2 expression ErbBLOW, ErbB2MED and ErbB2HIGH closely correlate with TNBC, ER+ and HER+ tumor subtypes respectively, a finding not paralleled by genome copy-number alone. Pathway analyses of differentially expressed genes demonstrated that TNBCs are particularly enriched for “Lymphocyte Activation” correlating with “chemotaxis”, “NK-cell activation” and “IFN-gamma signaling”. These immune-related gene signatures may provide an additional layer of clinically-relevant patient information as others have reported that T-cell infiltration into tumors indicate potential good response to cancer immunotherapy (e.g. Anti-PD1, Anti-CTLA4 drugs). We can use these transcriptomic immune signatures to determine their level of expression in individual patients, thus providing context for predicting response to immunotherapy in personalized medicinal manner.
    Lecture
  • Date:18TuesdayJune 2019

    Learning how to make new β cells: molecular mechanisms underlying reprogramming of exocrine pancreas cells into insulin-producing β cells

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    Time
    10:30 - 11:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Ofer Elhanani
    Members - Dept. of Biomolecular Sciences-WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Diabetes is a life-threatening disease caused by insufficien...»
    Diabetes is a life-threatening disease caused by insufficient circulating insulin, a key metabolic hormone produced by pancreatic β cells. A promising approach to diabetes treatment is cell replacement therapy, yet this is currently limited by shortage of donor β cells. To address this, direct reprogramming of somatic non-β cells has been suggested as a potential source of β cells. The goal of this research is to clarify the molecular mechanisms involved in the process of reprogramming to β cells. We developed and characterized an in vitro system for reprogramming of primary mouse pancreatic acinar cells to β-like cells. Reprogrammed cells exhibit many similarities to native β-cells. Furthermore, this system allowed the identification of the transcriptional repressor REST (RE-1 silencing transcription factor) as a novel regulator of reprogramming which acts by modifying the chromatin around endocrine gene enhancers, thereby altering accessibility and function of endocrine transcription factors. Improved understanding of the mechanisms underlying reprogramming are essential to permit its application in the future for regenerative and cell therapy-based treatment of diabetes.
    Lecture
  • Date:18TuesdayJune 2019

    Algebraic Geometry and Representation Theory Seminar

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:30
    Title
    Periods of automorphic forms over reductive groups
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 155
    Lecturer
    Michał Zydor
    University of Michigan
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Periods of automorphic forms have an important place in the ...»
    Periods of automorphic forms have an important place in the theory of automorphic representations. They are often related to (special values of) L-functions and have applications to arithmetic geometry and analytic number theory. For an automorphic form on a group G, a period is its integral over a subgroup of G. If the automorphic form is not cuspidal such integrals are usually divergent. It is nonetheless possible in many cases to extend the definition of the period to almost all automorphic forms which has direct applications to the study of the given period. In this talk I will describe a general procedure of defining such periods in the case when the subgroup is reductive.
    I will also discuss the joint work with A. Pollack and C. Wan that applies this to the study of certain periods and their relations to special values of L-functions confirming predictions of Sakellaridis and Venkatesh.
    Lecture
  • Date:18TuesdayJune 2019

    Highly resolved expression programs revealed by single-cell RNA-seq of a large virus infecting a bloom-forming alga

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    Time
    11:30 - 12:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Chuan Ku
    Institute of Plant and Microbial Biology, Academia Sinica, Taiwan
    Organizer
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Prof. Assaf Vardi...»
    Host: Prof. Assaf Vardi
    Lecture
  • Date:19WednesdayJune 2019

    Developmental Club

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    Time
    10:00
    Title
    “Kinetics of membraneless organelles”
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Eran Hornstein
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:19WednesdayJune 2019

    Machine Learning and Statistics Seminar

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:30
    Title
    Theoretical and Empirical Investigation of Several Common Practices in Deep Learning
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 1
    Lecturer
    Daniel Soudry
    Technion
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of We examine several empirical and theoretical results on the ...»
    We examine several empirical and theoretical results on the training of deep networks. For example, Why are common "over-fitting" indicators (e.g., very low training error, high validation loss) misleading? Why, sometimes, early-stopping time never arrives? Why can adaptive rate methods (e.g., adam) degrade generalization? Why commonly used loss functions exhibit better generalization than others? Why use weight decay before batch-norm? When can we use low numerical precision, and how low can we get? and discuss the practical implications of these results.

    Bio == Since October 2017, Daniel soudry is an assistant professor (Taub Fellow) in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the Technion, working in the areas of machine learning and theoretical neuroscience. Before that, he did his post-doc (as a Gruss Lipper fellow) working with Prof. Liam Paninski in the Department of Statistics, the Center for Theoretical Neuroscience the Grossman Center for Statistics of the Mind at Columbia University. He did his Ph.D. in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the Technion, Israel Institute of technology, under the guidance of Prof. Ron Meir. He received his B.Sc. degree in Electrical Engineering and Physics from the Technion.
    Lecture
  • Date:19WednesdayJune 2019

    Feinberg Graduation Ceremony

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    Time
    19:30 - 21:30
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:20ThursdayJune 2019

    Single and multi-frequency saturation methods for molecular and microstructural contrast in human MRI”

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    Time
    10:00 - 11:00
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Prof. Elena Vinogradov
    UT Southwestern Medical Center
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    The Helen and Martin Kimmel Institute for Magnetic Resonance
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provides excellent quality ...»
    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provides excellent quality images of soft tissues and is an established modality for diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of various diseases. Majority of MRI scans in clinical practice today report on anatomy, morphology and sometimes physiology. The new area of active studies is aimed at developing MRI contrast methods for the detection of the events at the microstructural and molecular level employing endogenous properties.

    Here, we will discuss methods that employ single- and multi-frequency saturation to detect events on microstructural and molecular level. First, we will describe principles and translational aspects of Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer1(CEST). CEST employs selective saturation of the exchanging protons and subsequent detection of the water signal decrease to create images that are weighted by the presence of a metabolite or pH2. We will describe aspects of translating CEST to reliable clinical applications and discuss its potential uses in human oncology, specifically breast cancer. Second, we will describe a method called inhomogeneous Magnetization Transfer3 (ihMT), which employs dual-frequency saturation to create contrast originating from the residual dipolar couplings and thus specific to microstructure. We will focus on the application of ihMT to the detection of myelin in brain and spinal cord. Finally, we will discuss a novel exchange-sensitive method based on the balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequence as an alternative way for chemical exchange detection (bSSFPX4). Using an effective field description, similarities between bSSFP and CW application can be explored and utilized for in-vivo MRI contrast.

    [1] K. Ward, et.al., JMR,143,79-87 (2000).
    [2] J. Zhou, et.al., Nature Medicine, 9,1085-1090 (2003).
    [3] G. Varma, et.al., MRM, 73, 614-622 (2015).
    [4] S. Zhang, et.al., JMR, 275, 55-67 (2017).
    Lecture
  • Date:20ThursdayJune 2019

    G-INCPM Special Guest Seminar - Dr. Vaclav Navratil, CEO & CTO, DIANA Biotechnologies, s.r.o.

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Title
    "DIANA: new platform for protein detection and screening of protein ligands"
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Organizer
    Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Recently developed DIANA platform (DNA-linked Inhibitor ANti...»
    Recently developed DIANA platform (DNA-linked Inhibitor ANtibody Assay) is suitable for both ultrasensitive protein detection in in vitro diagnostics and for enzyme inhibitor or protein ligand screening in drug discovery. As its name suggests, we originally designed DIANA to detect enzymes and its inhibitors, but we later showed that it is well suited also for detection of receptors and its ligands, to screen for protein-protein interaction inhibitors and for detection of small molecules. DIANA overcomes the limitations of current state of the art methods, as it can detect zeptomole amounts of targets, has a linear range of up to six logs and is applicable to biological matrices.

    Screening of chemical libraries is an important step in drug discovery, but it remains challenging for targets, which are difficult to express and purify, and current methods tend to produce false results. The sensitivity and selectivity of DIANA enables quantitative high-throughput screening of enzyme inhibitors, receptor ligands or inhibitors of protein-protein interactions with unpurified proteins. DIANA addresses also the remaining limitations of the current screening methods, as it allows high-throughput screening with high signal-to-noise ratio (Z’ factor > 0.9), sensitive hit discovery and ultralow rate of false positives (< 0.02%); while quantitatively determining the inhibition potency from a single well and requiring only picogram to nanogram quantities of potentially unpurified protein target (e.g. in human serum).

    At DIANA Biotechnologies, a recently established spin-off from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry in Prague, we aim to fully exploit the potential of the platform and to become center for development of new diagnostics and drug discovery. We are building up infrastructure for screening and hit to lead conversion, including our own ~150,000 compound library, which we will screen for medicinally relevant targets, taking just one week per target. The most promising compounds will be optimized for potency, selectivity, physical properties, pharmacology profile and in vitro and in vivo efficacy, where DIANA-based high-throughput ADME pharmacology tests can also be applied.

    In our talk, we will briefly summarize the assay protocol and its performance on model targets, as well as recent developments at DIANA Biotechnologies. We will discuss in more detail examples of current internal projects, mainly of the development of selectivity panels (example of inhibitors of human carbonic anhydrases) and of the first drug discovery project directed on influenza RNA polymerase and its different subunits.

    Lecture
  • Date:20ThursdayJune 2019

    Optoelectronic properties of surface-guided nanowires with controlled crystal structures and orientations

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Regev Ben Zvi
    PHd Student, Dept. Materials and Interfaces
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:20ThursdayJune 2019

    Physics Colloquium

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:30
    Title
    Dark Matter direct detection at a crossroads
    Location
    Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Ranny Budnik
    WIS
    Organizer
    Faculty of Physics
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of 11:00 Coffee, tea and more...»
    11:00 Coffee, tea and more
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The hunt for Dark Matter is reaching at a crossroads - after...»
    The hunt for Dark Matter is reaching at a crossroads - after two decades of incredible pace, where five orders of magnitude in parameter space were covered, no unambiguous signal has emerged for interaction between the alleged particles and our normal, baryonic matter. The next generation detectors, aiming at another order of magnitude sensitivity increase, are on the runway, and the question of what will be next takes interesting turns.
    I will cover the evidence for the existence of Dark Matter, present the state of the art results from the XENON1T experiment, and play with some novel ideas for the next step, trying to move the lamppost to where Dark Matter may still stay hidden.
    Colloquia
  • Date:20ThursdayJune 2019

    Late Middle Paleolithic site of Farah II: environmental and cultural contexts at the brinks of transition to the Upper Paleolithic in the southern Levant

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    Time
    13:00 - 14:00
    Location
    Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for Archaeological Science
    Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Dr. Mae Goder
    Department of Bible, Archaeology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies, Ben-Gurion University
    Organizer
    Academic Educational Research
    The Scientific Archaeology Unit
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:20ThursdayJune 2019

    Geometric Functional Analysis and Probability Seminar

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    Time
    13:30 - 15:30
    Title
    Double seminar
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 155
    Lecturer
    Mark Rudelson (UMich)
    .
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Speaker 1: Mark Rudelson (UMich) Title: Circular law for ...»
    Speaker 1: Mark Rudelson (UMich)

    Title: Circular law for sparse random matrices.

    Abstract: Consider a sequence of $n$ by $n$ random matrices $A_n$ whose entries are independent identically distributed random variables. The circular law asserts that the distribution of the eigenvalues of properly normalized matrices $A_n$ converges to the uniform measure on the unit disc as $n$ tends to infinity. We prove this law for sparse random matrices under the optimal sparsity assumption. Joint work with Konstantin Tikhomirov.

    Speaker 2: Serguei Popov (IMECC)

    Title: On the range of a two-dimensional conditioned random walk

    Abstract: We consider the two-dimensional simple random walk conditioned on never hitting the origin. This process is a Markov chain, namely, it is the Doob $h$-transform of the simple random walk with respect to the potential kernel. It is known to be transient and we show that it is "almost recurrent'' in the sense that each infinite set is visited infinitely often, almost surely. We prove that, for a "typical large set", the proportion of its sites visited by the conditioned walk is approximately a Uniform$[0,1]$ random variable. Also, given a set $GsubsetR^2$ that does not "surround" the origin, we prove that a.s. there is an infinite number of $k$'s such that $kGcap ^2$ is unvisited. These results suggest that the range of the conditioned walk has "fractal" behavior. This is a joint work with Nina Gantert and Marina Vachkovskaia, see arxiv.org/abs/1804.00291 Also, there is much more about conditioned walks in my new book (www.ime.unicamp.br/~popov/2srw.pdf, work in progress). Comments and suggestions on the latter are very welcome!
    Lecture
  • Date:20ThursdayJune 2019

    Charge scaling as a "free lunch" approach to electronic polarization in modelling aqueous electrolytes

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    Time
    15:00 - 16:00
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Prof. Pavel Jungwirth
    Institute of Chemistry, Academy of Sciences, Prague
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about In order to make modelling of aqueous electrolytes more accu...»
    In order to make modelling of aqueous electrolytes more accurate, we explore the recently suggested approach for effectively accounting for electronic polarization effects using ionic charge rescaling. Based on this approach we develop a new and accurate parametrization of ions. Comparison to neutron scattering and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations demonstrates that the charge scaling approach allows for an accurate description of concentrated aqueous salt solutions including divalent ions. The present approach should thus find broad use in efficient and accurate modelling of polyvalent ions in aqueous environments, such as those encountered in biological and technological applications.
    Lecture
  • Date:23SundayJune 2019

    Cell Penetration and Membrane Fusion: Two Sides of the Same Coin

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Prof. Pavel Jungwirth
    Institute of Chemistry, Academy of Sciences, Prague
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Soft Matter and Biomaterials
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Cell penetrating peptides have a unique potential for target...»
    Cell penetrating peptides have a unique potential for targeted drug delivery. While ATP-driven endocytosis is known to play a major role in their internalization, there has been also ample evidence for the importance of passive translocation for which the direct mechanism, where the peptide is thought to directly pass through the membrane via a temporary pore, has been widely advocated. In this talk, I will question this view and demonstrate that arginine-rich cell penetrating peptides can instead enter vesicles and cells by inducing multilamellarity and fusion, analogously to the action of calcium ions.

    Allolio C., Magarkar A., Jurkiewiczf P., Baxová K., Javanainen M., Mason P.E., Sachl R., Cebecauer M., Hof M., Horinek D., Heinz V., Rachel R., Zieglerg C.M., Schrofel A., Jungwirth P.: Arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides induce membrane multilamellarity and subsequently enter via formation of a fusion pore. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 115 (2018) 11923.
    Lecture
  • Date:23SundayJune 2019

    A Forward Model for the Architecture of Inner Planetary Systems

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    Time
    11:00
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Eric Ford
    Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics Penn State
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:23SundayJune 2019

    Strongly interacting phonons at finite temperature

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Dr. Olle Hellman
    Fritz Haber Institute
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Thermal motions of atoms is an ever-present phenomenon in al...»
    Thermal motions of atoms is an ever-present phenomenon in all of solid state physics. Phonons, quanta of heat, is the quasiparticule used to describe thermal motion in solids. Under normal conditions phonons are the dominant mechanism that govern transport and the largest contribution to entropy. I want to understand how phonons evolve in time, temperature, and how they behave when they interact strongly with each other or other quasiparticles.
    The inherent disorder in thermal motions makes theoretical predictions challenging. I will present methodological developments in finite temperature first principles simulations, specifically targeting strongly anharmonic systems. The method employs model Hamiltonians that explicitly depend on temperature. I will present applications pertaining to thermal conductivity, inelastic neutron spectra and phase stabilities, reproducing non-trivial temperature dependencies.
    Lecture
  • Date:24MondayJune 2019

    Virus Structure: How Structural Biology Can Inform Function and Therapy

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:30
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. David Stuart
    MRC Professor of Structural Biology, Division of Structural Biology, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford,
    Organizer
    Department of Structural Biology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:24MondayJune 2019

    Chemical and Biological Physics Dept Seminar

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Title
    Addressing the protocol dependence of glass plasticity and yielding
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Corrado Rainone
    Institute of Physics, University of Amsterdam
    Organizer
    Department of Chemical and Biological Physics
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:24MondayJune 2019

    IMM Guest seminar- Prof. Ofer Mandelboim will lecture on "TIGIT and its cellular and bacterial ligands: novel checkpoints for cancer immune therapy."

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    Time
    13:00 - 14:00
    Location
    Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Ofer Mandelboim
    Lautenberg Center for Immunology and cancer research, the Hebrew University Hadassha Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Organizer
    Department of Immunology
    Contact
    Lecture

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