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  • Date:13TuesdayNovember 2018

    Chemical and Biological Physics Special Seminar

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    Time
    11:00
    Title
    Studying cell dynamics using Quantitative Phase Imaging (QPI)
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Prof. Gabriel Popescu
    Quantitative Light Imaging Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Organizer
    Department of Chemical and Biological Physics
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Light scattering limits the quality of optical imaging of un...»
    Light scattering limits the quality of optical imaging of unlabeled biospecimens: too little
    scattering and the sample is transparent, exhibiting low contrast, and too much scattering
    washes the structure information altogether. Recent advances in QPI, an approach by which
    the pathlength shifts induced by a specimen are mapped at each point in the field of view,
    allow us to connect the two regimes. We developed spatial light interference microscopy
    (SLIM) as a high-sensitivity, high-resolution QPI method, which open new applications for
    studying structure and dynamics. SLIM provides interesting data on cell growth and
    intracellular transport, specifically, it distinguishes between random and deterministic cargo
    motion. We measured subtle vesicle transport changes following optogenetic stimulation of
    live cells. Based on principles of holography, we developed a new optical technique for
    measuring cell traction. We performed simultaneous measurements of cell growth and cellgenerated
    forces and showed their evolution during cell differentiation. However, SLIM
    works best for thin specimens, such as single cell layers and tissue slices. To expand this type
    of imaging to thick, multiply scattering media, we developed gradient light interference
    microcopy (GLIM). GLIM is capable of suppressing the incoherent background due to
    multiple scattering. We demonstrate the use of GLIM to image various samples bovine
    embryos and live brain slices. Intrinsic dynamic markers promise to provide information
    about embryo viability, prior to implantation.
    Lecture
  • Date:13TuesdayNovember 2018

    Bio-inspired Cooperative Catalysis

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Prof. Galia Maayan
    Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion
    Organizer
    Department of Organic Chemistry
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:13TuesdayNovember 2018

    Saving roots for rainy days

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    Time
    11:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Zvi Peleg
    The Robert H. Smith Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture, Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
    Organizer
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Homepage
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Dr. Einat Segev...»
    Host: Dr. Einat Segev
    Lecture
  • Date:13TuesdayNovember 2018

    Perception and retinal integration of rod and cone signals in primate

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    Time
    12:30
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Dr. William Grimes
    NINDS/NIH
    Organizer
    Department of Neurobiology
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Dr. Michal Rivlin michal.rivlin@weizmann.ac.il tel: ...»
    Host: Dr. Michal Rivlin michal.rivlin@weizmann.ac.il tel: 2792

    For assistance with accessibility issues, please contact naomi.moses@weizmann.ac.il

    AbstractShow full text abstract about Over the course of a natural day-night cycle, mean luminance...»
    Over the course of a natural day-night cycle, mean luminance levels can span ten log units or more. Mammalian retinas effectively encode visual information over this vast range, in part by utilizing exquisitely sensitive rod photoreceptors in dim conditions and multiple color-variant cone photoreceptors in bright conditions. These visual signals, regardless of origin, must pass through a common set of retinal ganglion cells, thereby creating opportunities for signal interactions. Human perceptual experiments conducted under intermediate lighting conditions reveal constructive and destructive interactions between flickering rod and cone stimuli that are thought to originate in the retina. In support of this hypothesis, we find rod-cone flicker interference in On and Off retinal ganglion cells that project! to magnocellular visual pathways in primates. The dependence of this interference on the frequency and phase of the temporal modulation is similar to that observed in perceptual measurements. Recordings from within the retinal circuitry indicate that rod-cone signal interference reflects a linear combination of kinetically-distinct rod and cone signals upstream of the ganglion cell synaptic inputs. Ultimately, using our empirically-derived data as a foundation, we construct a mathematical model that recapitulates known rod-cone interactions and predicts retinal output in response to a broad range of time-varying rod and cone stimuli.
    Lecture
  • Date:13TuesdayNovember 2018

    Regulation of bidirectional motility of kinesin-5 motors

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Prof. Leah Gheber
    Organizer
    Department of Structural Biology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:14WednesdayNovember 2018

    The Shikimate Pathway as in Interface Between Primary and Specialized Metabolism in Plants

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    Time
    11:00
    Title
    PHD Thesis Defense
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Maor Battat
    Prof. Asaph Aharoni's lab., Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Organizer
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:14WednesdayNovember 2018

    Machine Learning and Statistics Seminar

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:30
    Title
    Beyond SGD: Data Adaptive Methods for Machine Learning
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 1
    Lecturer
    Kfir Levy
    ETH
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:14WednesdayNovember 2018

    G-INCPM Science Meeting - Dr. David Morgenstern & Rotem Barzilay - "RawBeans"

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    Time
    14:30 - 15:30
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. David Morgenstern & Rotem Barzilay - G-INCPM
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about RawBeans" ...»
    RawBeans"
    Lecture
  • Date:15ThursdayNovember 2018

    Cancer Volatolomics: From Evidence to Point-of-Care Diagnostics

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Title
    Cancer Research Club
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Hossam Haick
    Department of Chemical Engineering and the Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The current talk will present evidences that each cancer has...»
    The current talk will present evidences that each cancer has its own unique volatile molecular print and, therefore, the presence of one cancer would not screen out others. Based on this concept, a new generation of biomedical devices for achieving personalized diagnosis of various cancers in a noninvasive, inexpensive and portable manner via various body fluids (e.g., breath or skin) will be presented and discussed.
    Lecture
  • Date:18SundayNovember 201823FridayNovember 2018

    5th European Conference on Trapped ions

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Chairperson
    Roee Ozeri
    Homepage
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:18SundayNovember 2018

    The role of ocean circulation in the climate’s response to anthropogenic emissions

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    Time
    11:00
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Rei Chemke
    Columbia University
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The effects of ocean circulation on the climate’s response t...»
    The effects of ocean circulation on the climate’s response to anthropogenic emissions at low and high latitudes are examined. At high latitudes, we examine the effects of ocean circulation on the North Atlantic sea surface temperature, which has large climate impacts in the Northern Hemisphere. In recent years and in climate projections a cooling trend is found in the North Atlantic surface (the North Atlantic warming hole). Using observations and large ensemble of model simulations, we find that since the beginning of 21st century there has been a reduction in surface meridional heat advection, which cools the North Atlantic midlatitudes and is part of an emerged forced response to anthropogenic emissions and not part of internal climate variability, and thus projected to continue in coming decades.

    At low latitudes, the Hadley cell plays an important role in setting the strength and position of the hydrological cycle. Climate projections show a weakening of the Hadley cell, together with widening of its vertical and meridional extents. These changes are projected to have profound global climatic impacts. Current theories for the Hadley cell response to increased greenhouse gases account only for atmospheric and oceanic thermodynamic changes, but not for oceanic circulation changes. Here, the effects of ocean circulation changes on the Hadley cell response to increased greenhouse gases are examined. First, using a hierarchy of ocean-model configurations under increased greenhouse gases or arctic sea-ice loss, we show that, by cooling the surface and atmosphere, ocean circulation contracts and strengthens the Hadley cell, and thus reduces its projected response.

    Lecture
  • Date:18SundayNovember 2018

    Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2018-2019

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    Time
    13:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Neta Rahimi
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Student and Post-Doc Seminar
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:18SundayNovember 2018

    Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2018-2019

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    Time
    13:00
    Title
    “Dynamics of a morphogen gradient shapes gastrulation”
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Neta Rahimi
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Student and Post-Doc Seminar
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:19MondayNovember 2018

    Chemical and Biological Physics Guest Seminar

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    Time
    10:30
    Title
    Internal Waves in the Ocean: what we know and what we do not
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Prof Yuri Lvov
    Mathematical Sciences Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
    Organizer
    Department of Chemical and Biological Physics
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The term “ocean waves” typically evokes images of surface wa...»
    The term “ocean waves” typically evokes images of surface waves shaking ships during storms in the open ocean, or breaking rhythmically near the shore. Yet much of the ocean wave action takes place far underneath the surface, and consists of surfaces of constant
    density being disturbed and modulated. These -internal waves- are ubiquitous in the ocean, contain a large amount of ocean energy, and play an important role in the ocean circulation since they transfer energy from large to small scales and thus provide a link between climatological forcing and small-scale dissipation.
    Yet, despite internal wave ubiquity, energy, and decades of study we still do not understand how the energy cascades through the internal wave spectrum.
    In this talk the traditional wave turbulence formulation of internal wave interaction will be discussed, and rebutted: internal waves are too nonlinear to be accurately described by the kinetic equation. So we are in the midst of something gloriously messy and nonlinear. We
    will propose an alternative formulation based on the hypothesis of scale separated (nonlocal) interactions in momentum space.

    This is joined work with Dr. Kurt Polzin from whoi.edu
    Lecture
  • Date:19MondayNovember 2018

    Foundations of Computer Science Seminar

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    Time
    14:30 - 16:00
    Title
    Hitting Convex Sets with Points
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 155
    Lecturer
    Natan Rubin
    Ben Gurion University
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:20TuesdayNovember 2018

    Computer Science Seminar

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    Time
    09:15 - 11:00
    Title
    Data Science with Game Theory Flavor
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer
    Moshe Tennenholtz
    Technion
    Organizer
    Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Seminar, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Seminar, Department of Mathematics
    Seminar
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:20TuesdayNovember 2018

    Nuclear Genome Nanostructure Imaging at Single Molecule Resolution

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    Time
    10:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Christoph Cremer
    1Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB) & Max-Planck Institute for Chemistry, D-55128 Mainz/Germany; 2Institute for Pharmacy and Molecular Biotechnology (IPMB), University Heidelberg & Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics (KIP), D-69120 Heidelberg/Germany e-mail: c.cremer@imb-mainz.de; cremer@kip.uni-heidelberg.de www.optics.imb-mainz.de
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Developmental Club
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy allows quantitative...»
    Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy allows quantitative studies of nuclear genome organization on the nanoscale1. Here we report on results obtained by single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM). SMLM has made possible to explore chromatin nanostructure down to the imaging of single histones, of short oligosequences, or single DNA sites; presently, an intranuclear optical resolution down to the 5 nm range has been achieved. Applying a novel SMLM technique (fBALM)2, the DNA distribution across entire nuclei at nanoscale resolution was quantitatively determined, localizing in individual nuclear optical sections up to ~4 million individual DNA bound single fluorophore molecule positions, corresponding to about one position per nucleosome. Intensity profile analyses of the intranuclear DNA distributions indicated sharp transitions between high-density domains and low-density compartments, with differences up to almost two orders of magnitude; compacted regions had a minimum diameter down to ca. 50 nm diameter. In contrast to these results, conventional resolution imaging of the same nuclear sites indicated only small differences in the compaction of different regions, combined with very smooth density transitions. Taken together, the quantitative compaction estimates support models of a nuclear organization based on highly compartmentalized chromatin nanostructures3.
    Lecture
  • Date:20TuesdayNovember 2018

    Genetics with no sex— Somatic recombination in plant cells.

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    Time
    10:00 - 11:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Avraham Levi
    Dept. of Plant and Environmental Sciences- WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Homologous recombination is an engine of genetic diversity i...»
    Homologous recombination is an engine of genetic diversity in evolution and in plant breeding. This process typically occurs during meiosis when homologous chromosomes pair and exchange DNA segments. It is a stochastic and infrequent process; closely linked genes rarely recombine and it is limited to sexual reproduction. We showed recently that inter-homologues recombination can be targeted at specific loci, using a CRISPR-Cas-induced DNA double strand break in plant somatic tissues. We discuss the mechanisms of somatic recombination and the prospect for redesigning chromosomes in a targeted manner in crops with or without sexual reproduction.
    Lecture
  • Date:21WednesdayNovember 201823FridayNovember 2018

    Minerva Workshop on Lie Algebras and Related Topics

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    Location
    Elaine and Bram Goldsmith Building for Mathematics and Computer Sciences
    Room 208
    Organizer
    Department of Mathematics
    Homepage
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:21WednesdayNovember 2018

    Novel Nanophotonics in the Ultrafast Transmission Electron Microscope

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Prof. Ido Kaminer
    Department of Electrical Engineering and Solid State Institute, Technion
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about We will discuss new science and applications enabled by the ...»
    We will discuss new science and applications enabled by the ultrafast interactions of electrons and laser pulses inside electron microscopes.
    Such interactions enable novel microscopy techniques with time-correlated measurements and the new method of stimulated electron energy loss spectroscopy (SEELS).
    From the standpoint of fundamental science, controlling ultrafast strong-field interactions inside electron microscopes enable exploring new principles for generating extreme ultraviolet and x-ray radiation, as well as novel light-matter interactions in nanostructures and in 2D materials.

    Lecture

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