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  • Date:26TuesdaySeptember 201728ThursdaySeptember 2017

    Minerva Annual Meeting 2017

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    Time
    All day
    Title
    Minerva Committee interviews of scientists who submitted full proposals in all faculties
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  • Date:26TuesdaySeptember 2017

    Shedding light on the dynamics of HIV-1 infection in humanized mouse model through virological and omics approaches

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    Time
    10:00 - 11:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Kei Sato
    Institute for Frontier Life and Medical Sciences,Kyoto University,Japan
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
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    AbstractShow full text abstract about To overcome the anti-viral effects mediated by type I interf...»
    To overcome the anti-viral effects mediated by type I interferon-induced restriction factors, HIV-1 have evolutionarily acquired viral antagonists. For instance, tetherin (also known as BST2), a well-known protein restricting HIV-1 replication, exerts anti-HIV-1 effect by anchoring released progeny virions on the cell surface, whereas viral protein U (Vpu), an HIV-1-encoding accessory protein, antagonizes the anti-viral action mediated by tetherin. However, its precise role in HIV-1 replication in vivo remains unclear. Here we use a hematopoietic stem cell-transplanted humanized mouse model and several vpu mutants specifically lacking its function and demonstrate that anti-tetherin ability of Vpu is a prerequisite for efficient viral spread during the initial phase of infection. Our results suggest that tetherin is an important intrinsic effector restricting HIV-1 replication in vivo, while Vpu is a key factor to ensure efficient viral spread during the initial phase of infection by antagonizing tetherin.
    Furthermore, by using HIV-1-infected humanized mouse model, we have recently launched a new approach to investigate the dynamics of HIV-1 infection through omics analyses. We would like to introduce our recent findings and discuss about them.
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdaySeptember 2017

    Hydration friction in nano-confinement

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Prof. Roland Netz
    Dept. Physics, Freie Universität Berlin
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
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    DetailsShow full text description of We study the shear friction between hydrophilic surfaces by ...»
    We study the shear friction between hydrophilic surfaces by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. With decreasing water film thickness we find three consecutive friction regimes: For thick films friction is governed by bulk water viscosity. At intermediate separations of about a nanometer the highly viscous interfacial water layers dominate and increase the surface friction, while at the transition to the dry friction limit interfacial slip sets in. We propose a confinement-dependent model that accounts for the additive friction contributions from bulk-like water, interfacial water layers and interfacial slip.


    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdaySeptember 2017

    Redox control of eukaryotic secretion by a novel pathway regulating the ER import of glutathione

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    Time
    11:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Michel B. Toledano
    Chief, LSOC, Institute for Integrative Biology of the Cell (I2BC), CNRS, CEA–Saclay, Université Paris–Saclay, iBiTecS/SBIGEM, Laboratoire Stress Oxydant et Cancer (LSOC) Gif-sur-Yvette, France
    Organizer
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
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    AbstractShow full text abstract about Disturbance of glutathione metabolism is a hallmark of numer...»
    Disturbance of glutathione metabolism is a hallmark of numerous diseases, yet glutathione functions are still poorly understood. One key to address this question is to consider its functional compartmentation. In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), protein folding requires disulfide bond formation catalyzed by the thiol oxidase Ero1 and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). In the ER, glutathione is thought to counterbalance ER oxidation by the Ero1-PDI redox relay, which explain its relative more oxidized redox state (EGSH -242 mV), relative to the cytoplasm (EGSH = -295 mV). To access the function of GSH in this compartment, we first asked about the mechanism that maintains the ER EGSH homeostatic value. As GSH is exclusively synthesized in the cytoplasm and there is no GSH reductase in the ER to recycle the GSSG produced by the activity of the ER Ero1-PDI oxidative pathway, maintenance of ER EGSH likely depends on an ER import of GSH and export of GSSG. We found that GSH enters the ER by facilitated diffusion through the protein-conducting channel Sec61. We also found that an oxidized form of the chaperone Bip (Kar2 in yeast) inhibits this transport. We show that increased ER transport of GSH triggers Ero1 activation by reduction of its negative regulatory disulfides, which in turn leads to Bip oxidation by the H2O2 by-product of Ero1 activity. This regulated transport is strongly activated during ER stress by the UPR induction of Ero1 and an increase in GSH biosynthesis. Thus, the ER poise is tuned by a reciprocal control of GSH import into the ER and Ero1 activation. Such a reciprocal control is aimed at preventing a “short circuit” between the ER oxidative and reductive pathways, which would lead to Ero1 chronic cycling, cellular GSH consumption and cell death. I will discuss the implications of these findings in human pathology
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdaySeptember 2017

    “Selenium Atom-specific Derivatization of Nucleic Acids for Structure and Function Studies”

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Prof. Zhen Huang
    Department of Chemistry and Department of Biology Georgia State University USA
    Organizer
    Department of Structural Biology
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  • Date:03TuesdayOctober 2017

    G-INCPM Special Seminar - Prof. Yuval Ebenstein, Dept. of Chemical Physics, School of Chemistry, Tel-Aviv Univ. - "Beyond NGS - Single-Molecule Genomics"

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:30
    Location
    Nancy and Stephen Grand Israel National Center for Personalized Medicine
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Yuval Ebenstein
    Dept. of Chemical Physics School of Chemistry Tel-Aviv Univ.
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
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    AbstractShow full text abstract about Next generation sequencing (NGS) is revolutionizing all fiel...»
    Next generation sequencing (NGS) is revolutionizing all fields of biological research but it fails to extract the full range of information associated with genetic material. Complementary genomic technologies that analyze individual, unamplified genomic DNA are filling the gaps in the capabilities of NGS. Using such technologies we gain access to the structural variation and long range patterns of genetic and epigenetic information. Recent results from our lab demonstrate our ability to detect and map the epigenetic marks 5-methylacytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine as well as various forms of DNA damage on individual genomic DNA molecules. This new technology allows genetic and epigenetic variation calling on the single cell level without the need to process single cells.
    Lecture
  • Date:15SundayOctober 2017

    G-INCPM Special Seminar - Prof. Izhak Haviv, Cancer Personalized Medicine & Genomic Diagnostics Lab, Azrieli Faculty of Medicine, Zfat, Bar-Ilan University - "Evidence-based, personalized, or immuno-medicine – where’s the perfect healthcare"

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:30
    Location
    Nancy and Stephen Grand Israel National Center for Personalized Medicine
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Izhak Haviv
    Cancer Personalized Medicine & Genomic Diagnostics Lab, Azrieli Faculty of Medicine, Zfat, Bar-Ilan Univ.
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
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    AbstractShow full text abstract about The etiological bases of cancer are a large number of ‘bugs’...»
    The etiological bases of cancer are a large number of ‘bugs’, mutations in the human genome, mostly accumulating in somatic cells during patient’s lifespan. It took more than a century to translate this etiological insight into new ways to smart-bomb the cancer away. As new treatment options emerge, healthcare guidelines seek ways, such companion testing, to identify the patient, the treatment is most likely to benefit. The dynamic nature of the field of medical discoveries poses a challenge to the clinical decision making process, and guidelines have therefore gone through a series of paradigm shifts, all based on risk-benefit assessments. First, in the evidence-based paradigm, optional treatments are ranked according to the fraction of patients the treatment is likely to benefit, starting from the most commonly useful treatment and down the fractional benefit rank. Then, personalized medicine approach utilizes clinical and genomic sequence and molecular analyses, to rearrange the treatments rank, and recommend each patient with their own best treatment. In the most recent paradigm, immune-oncology, we profile the direct adaptive immune reaction, T-cell receptor sequence, to cancer-borne somatic mutations. The unique sequence of the respective T-cell receptors had been demonstrated to genetically code for the recognition and elimination of cells, carrying and presenting the mutant sequence. In other words, the cure to each patient is hidden in their own body, and once discovered, has the potential to harness the progression of cancer, as is being done for patients with high mutation load and immunological checkpoint inhibitors. While this approach is more bioinformatically and experimentally intensive, the results obtained from this approach are far superior, both in the end-stage patients it succeeds to benefit, as well as the duration of remission. Using double-autologous patient-derived xenografts, that model both the cancer tissue, as well as the immune system of each patient, we are harnessing these technologies to improve and accelerate the implementation of those new paradigms in the clinical practice.
    Lecture
  • Date:15SundayOctober 2017

    Identification of Potent Fli-1 Inhibitors from Chinese Medicinal Plants for treatment of Leukemia

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Title
    Special Guest Seminar
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Dr. Yaacov Ben-David
    Key laboratory of Chemistry for Natural Products of Guizhou Province and Chinese Academy of Sciences Affiliated with Guizhou Medical University
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
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    DetailsShow full text description of This seminar's date has changed and was postponed to Oc...»
    This seminar's date has changed and was postponed to October 15.
    Rina
    Lecture
  • Date:16MondayOctober 2017

    Protein evolution - from so simple a beginning

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Chairperson
    Dan Tawfik
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  • Date:17TuesdayOctober 2017

    Dissecting a Three-Protein Brain: The Chemosensory Array of E. coli

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    Time
    10:00 - 11:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. John S. Parkinson
    Dept. of Biology - University of Utah
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
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  • Date:18WednesdayOctober 2017

    A tutorial on the MPI Toolkit for protein bioinformatics analysis

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Chairperson
    Dan Tawfik
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  • Date:18WednesdayOctober 2017

    Monitoring treatment response by imaging oncogenic rewiring and immune microenvironment changes, through combining whole body imaging with tissue / exosome-based approaches

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Title
    Special Guest Seminar
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Prof. Tony Ng
    School of Cancer and Pharmaceutical Sciences, King’s College London Department of Oncology at UCL-Cancer Institute, London
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
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    Lecture
  • Date:19ThursdayOctober 2017

    Physics Colloquium

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:15
    Location
    Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Ofer Feinerman
    WIS
    Organizer
    Faculty of Physics
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    DetailsShow full text description of 11:00 Coffee, Tea and more ...»
    11:00 Coffee, Tea and more
    AbstractShow full text abstract about TBA ...»
    TBA
    Colloquia
  • Date:19ThursdayOctober 2017

    "Image Scanning Microscopy and Metal Induced Energy Transfer: Enhancing Microscopy Resolution in All Directions"

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    Time
    14:00
    Title
    Special Seminar
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Prof. Jörg Enderlein
    III. Institute of Physics – Biophysics Department of Physics Georg August University Germany
    Organizer
    Department of Structural Biology
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Classical fluorescence microscopy is limited in resolution b...»
    Classical fluorescence microscopy is limited in resolution by the wavelength of light (diffraction limit) restricting lateral resolution to ca. 200 nm, and axial resolution to ca. 500 nm (at typical excitation and emission wavelengths around 500 nm). However, recent years have seen a tremendous development in high- and super-resolution techniques of fluorescence microscopy, pushing spatial resolution to its diffraction-dictated limits and much beyond. One of these techniques is Image Scanning Microscopy (ISM). In ISM, the focus of a conventional laser-scanning confocal microscope (LCSM) is scanned over the sample, but instead of recording only the total fluorescence intensity for each scan position, as done in conventional operation of an LCSM, one records a small image of the illuminated region. The result is a four-dimensional stack of data: two dimensions refer to the lateral scan position, and two dimensions to the pixel position on the chip of the image-recording camera. This set of data can then be used to obtain a super-resolved image with doubled resolution, completely analogously to what is achieved with Structured Illumination Microscopy. However, ISM is conceptually and technically much simpler, suffers less from sample imperfections like refractive index variations, and can easily be implemented into any existing LSCM. I will also present recent results of combining ISM with two-photon excitation, which is important for deep-tissue imaging of e.g. neuronal tissue, and for performing non-linear coherent microscopy such as second-harmonic generation.

    A second method which I will present is concerned with achieving nanometer resolution along the optical axis. It is called Metal Induced Energy Transfer or MIET and is based on the fact that, when placing a fluorescent molecule close to a metal, its fluorescence properties change dramatically. In particular, one observes a strongly modified lifetime of its excited state (Purcell effect). This coupling between an excited emitter and a metal film is strongly dependent on the emitter’s distance from the metal. We have used this effect for mapping the basal membrane of live cells with an axial accuracy of ~3 nm. The method is easy to implement and does not require any change to a conventional fluorescence lifetime microscope; it can be applied to any biological system of interest, and is compatible with most other super-resolution microscopy techniques which enhance the lateral resolution of imaging. Moreover, it is even applicable to localizing individual molecules, thus offering the prospect of three-dimensional single-molecule localization microscopy with nanometer isotropic resolution for structural biology.
    Lecture
  • Date:22SundayOctober 2017

    "A stress-Induced Hidden Secret of the Genetic Code"

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    Time
    10:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Hanna Engelberg-Kulka
    Hadassah Medical School, The Hebrew University
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Lecture
  • Date:22SundayOctober 2017

    2017 Weizmann Memorial Lecture

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    Time
    15:00 - 16:30
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Gero Miesenböck
    Optogenetics: Lighting Up the Brain
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  • Date:23MondayOctober 2017

    Life Science Colloquium

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Title
    TBD
    Location
    Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Oliver Hobert
    Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
    Organizer
    Life Sciences
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    Colloquia
  • Date:23MondayOctober 2017

    2017 Weizmann Memorial Lecture

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    Time
    15:00 - 16:30
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Gero Miesenböck
    Time to Decide
    Academic Events
  • Date:24TuesdayOctober 2017

    HESTPV Solar ERAnet October 2017 meeting

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    Michael and Anna Wix Auditorium
    Jean Goldwurm 3D Visualization Theater
    Chairperson
    David Cahen
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  • Date:26ThursdayOctober 2017

    Physics Colloquium

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:15
    Location
    Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Jason Petta
    Princeton
    Organizer
    Faculty of Physics
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    DetailsShow full text description of 11:00 Coffee, Tea and more ...»
    11:00 Coffee, Tea and more
    AbstractShow full text abstract about TBA ...»
    TBA
    Colloquia

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