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  • Date:18WednesdaySeptember 2019

    Forecast Skill and the Impact of Equatorial Waves in Two Operational Weather Prediction Systems

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    Time
    11:00
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    George N. Kiladis
    Physical Sciences Division, Earth System Research Laboratory National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Equatorially trapped waves account for a large portion of th...»
    Equatorially trapped waves account for a large portion of the perturbations within the tropical atmosphere and ocean. In the atmosphere, these disturbances are coupled to convection and determine a significant amount of rainfall variability on synoptic to intraseasonal time scales. Numerical models used for both weather and climate forecasting universally still have great difficulty simulating these convectively coupled disturbances. We assess the quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPF) skill of NOAA's Global Forecast System (GFS) and the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting Integrated Forecast System (IFS) operational models used for short term forecasts out to 10 days. Forecast skill was assessed by comparison with virtually independent GPM and CMORPH satellite precipitation estimates. Skill was quantified using a variety of metrics including pattern correlations for various latitude bands, temporal correlation at individual grid points, and space-time spectra of forecast precipitation over the global tropics and extratropics. Results reveal that, in general, initial conditions are reasonably well estimated in both forecast systems, as indicated by relatively good scores for the 6-12 hour forecasts. Since precipitation estimates are not directly assimilated into these systems, this indicates that the initialization of dynamical and thermodynamical fields is able to produce a reasonable QPF field, at least for the larger scales. We present evidence that the specification of the mass circulation rather than the moisture field is the primary source of this initial skill. Model skill is substantially better overall in the extratropics, however, tropical QPF in both systems is not considered useful by typical metrics much beyond a few days. A portion of this lack of tropical skill in can be traced back to inadequate treatment of equatorial wave activity coupled to convection. It is also demonstrated that extratropical forecast skill is positively correlated to preceding tropical skill, strongly suggesting that improvements in the treatment of tropics will lead to improved extratropical forecasts on the weekly and longer timescale.
    Lecture
  • Date:18WednesdaySeptember 2019

    G-INCPM-Special Seminar - Prof. Govert Somsen, Division of BioAnalytical Chemistry, Vrije University, Amsterdam - "Probing the heterogeneity of intact proteins"

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    Time
    15:00 - 16:15
    Location
    Nancy and Stephen Grand Israel National Center for Personalized Medicine
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Govert Somsen
    University of Amsterdam
    Organizer
    Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Emerging requirements in biopharmaceutical quality control a...»
    Emerging requirements in biopharmaceutical quality control and top-down proteomics, have led to a growing interest in intact protein analysis. Detailed characterization of intact protein heterogeneity, e.g. resulting from post-translational modifications, is a challenging task. Separation prior to mass spectrometric (MS) detection commonly is essential to achieve reliable and sensitive assignment of intact protein variants. Conventional liquid chromatographic (LC) protein separation methods often show poor compatibility with MS and/or lack the selectivity to resolve proteoforms. Moreover, LC conditions may be denaturing, precluding assessment of protein conformers and proteoform affinity. This lecture presents the design and application of new LC-MS and capillary electrophoresis (CE)-MS methods allowing detailed determination of the heterogeneity of intact proteins. Performance will be illustrated by characterization of pharmaceutical proteins, such as interferon-beta, erythropoietin, and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), as well as cell-lysate proteins and IgGs in human plasma.
    Lecture
  • Date:19ThursdaySeptember 2019

    Astroglial control of neural circuit activities and animal behavior

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    Time
    14:00
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Menachem Katz
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:22SundaySeptember 201925WednesdaySeptember 2019

    The Batsheva de Rothschild Seminar on NON-APOPTOTIC ROLES OF APOPTOTIC PROTEINS

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Chairperson
    Eli Arama
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:22SundaySeptember 2019

    Ben May Center for Chemical Theory and Computation, Inaugural lecture

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    Time
    11:00
    Title
    Trick with Bricks: Complex self-assembly comes of age
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Prof Daan Frenkel
    University of Cambridge
    Organizer
    Department of Chemical and Biological Physics
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about A holy grail of nano-technology is to create truly complex, ...»
    A holy grail of nano-technology is to create truly complex, multi-component structures by self-assembly. Most self-assembly has focused on the creation of "structural complexity". In my talk, I will discuss "Addressable Complexity": the creation of structures that contain hundreds or thousands of distinct building blocks that all have to find their place in a 3D structure. Experiments on “DNA bricks” have demonstrated the feasibility of making such structures. Simulation and theory yield surprising insights that suggest design principles for brick structures. Interestingly, the design principles are different for DNA origami.
    Lecture
  • Date:22SundaySeptember 2019

    The Long and Winding Road: From HIV Reverse Transcriptase Structure to Five Therapeutic Drugs, and New Insights into Viral Assembly and Maturation

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Prof. Eddy Arnold
    Board of Governors Professor and Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers University
    Organizer
    Department of Structural Biology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:22SundaySeptember 2019

    When people disappear - Stories and fairytales

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    Time
    19:30 - 21:00
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Professor Daniel H. Wagner
    Prof. Daniel Wagner has been researching his Polish roots since 1995. He is the author of 35 genealogical papers and the editor of a book about scientific tools in genealogy. He is a member of IGRA, and a member of the Management Committee of the International Institute for Jewish Genealogy and the Paul Jacobi Center.
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about In the history of many families, all that remains about the ...»
    In the history of many families, all that remains about the fate of an ancestor for whom all traces were lost are rumors, often in conflicting versions. One of the most gratifying pleasures of a genealogical quest is to unveil the true story. Two examples taken from the lecturer’s personal history will demonstrate this.
    Lecture
  • Date:23MondaySeptember 2019

    Ribosomal decoding, tRNA modifications and human disease

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:15
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Prof. Eric Westhof
    Institut de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique
    Organizer
    Faculty of Chemistry
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Decoding during ribosomal translation occurs through complex...»
    Decoding during ribosomal translation occurs through complex and interdependent molecular recognition networks between mRNA, tRNA, and rRNA. Among those, the stability of codon-anticodon triplets, the fold of the tRNA anticodon hairpin, the modified nucleotides, and the interactions with rRNA bases at the decoding site cosntitute key contributors. On the basis of biochemical and genetic data in the literature, coupled with many crystal structures of fully active ribosomes, nucleotide modifications at positions 34 and 37 of the anticodon loop are now understood molecularly. Both pre-organize the anticodon loop for efficient mRNA binding. The modifications at 37 stabilize AU-rich codon-anticodon pairs and maintain the coding frame. The modifications at 34 help to avoid miscoding and allow to decode purine-ending codons in split codon boxes by promoting base pairing that can be accommodated within the structural constraints of the ribosomal grip at the decoding site.
    Depending on the codon box, the tRNA modifications allow for diversity in codon usage depending on genomic GC content as well as on the number and types of isoacceptor tRNAs. Although universal, the genetic code is not translated identically and differences exist not only between organisms in the three kingdoms of life but also between cellular types. To decipher diversely but efficiently the genetic code, cells developed sophisticated arrays between tRNA pools and tRNA modifications, anchored in the cellular metabolic enzymatic pathways and guaranteeing protein homeostasis. Examples of mutations leading to specific human diseases in some of those enzymes will be described.
    Colloquia
  • Date:23MondaySeptember 2019

    Tonic GABAA receptor mediated conductance at cellular and network levels

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Brain Research
    Lecturer
    Prof. Alexey Semyanov
    Head, Dept of Molecular Neurobiology, Institute of BioOrganic Chemistry, Moscow
    Organizer
    Department of Neurobiology
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Benoziyo Brain Research Building Room 113 Host: Prof. M...»
    Benoziyo Brain Research Building Room 113

    Host: Prof. Menahem Segal menahem.segal@weizmann.ac.il tel: 2553

    For assistance with accessibility issues, please contact naomi.moses@weizmann.ac.il
    AbstractShow full text abstract about GABAA receptors mediate two forms of signaling in the brain:...»
    GABAA receptors mediate two forms of signaling in the brain: phasic and tonic. Phasic signaling (e.g., IPSCs) is mediated by synaptic GABAA receptors, while tonic signaling (e.g., tonic current or tonic conductance) is mediated by extrasynaptic GABAA receptors. Tonic current is expressed in a cell-type specific manner and is mediated by heterogeneous and plastic GABAA receptors. These receptors are activated by ambient GABA that originates from vesicular and non-vesicular sources and is regulated by different GABA transporter systems.
    Tonic GABAA conductance is commonly referred as tonic inhibition. We found that ambient GABA can actually excite adult hippocampal interneurons. In these cells, the GABAA reversal potential is depolarizing, making baseline tonic GABAA conductance excitatory. Increasing the tonic conductance enhances shunting-mediated inhibition, which eventually overpowers the excitation. Because hippocampal interneurons are the key to setting the network rhythms this mechanism allows bidirectional control of network synchronization by tonic GABAA receptor-mediated signaling.
    We also show that tonic GABAA conductance decreases the membrane time constant (τm) and improves the temporal fidelity of EPSP-spike coupling. Long-term potentiation (LTP) induced by different stimulation patterns is differently affected by tonic GABAA conductance.
    Our findings thus point to an important role of extrasynaptic signaling mediated by GABAA receptors in brain computations.
    Lecture
  • Date:24TuesdaySeptember 2019

    To be announced

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    Time
    09:00 - 10:00
    Title
    Stem Cells, Regeneration and Aging Breakfast Seminar
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Seminar Room
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:24TuesdaySeptember 2019

    Harnessing autophagic flux for improving plant fitness

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    Time
    10:00 - 11:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Peter Bozhkov
    Professor of Biochemistry, Department of Molecular Sciences, Uppsala BioCenter, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences and Linnean Center for Plant Biology, Uppsala, SWEDEN
    Organizer
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Dr. Hadas Zehavi...»
    Host: Dr. Hadas Zehavi
    Lecture
  • Date:24TuesdaySeptember 2019

    IMM Guest seminar- Prof.Mark Dawson will lecture on "Targeting the Epigenome in Cancer."

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof.Mark Dawson
    Organizer
    Department of Immunology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:24TuesdaySeptember 2019

    Chemical and Biological Physics Guest Seminar

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    Time
    11:00
    Title
    Probing Reactions at Electrochemical and Catalytic Interfaces with X-ray Spectroscopies
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Dr. Robert Weatherup
    University of Manchester, UK
    Organizer
    Department of Chemical and Biological Physics
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Probing the chemical reactions occurring at electrochemical ...»
    Probing the chemical reactions occurring at electrochemical and catalytic interfaces under realistic conditions is critical to selecting and designing improved materials for energy storage, corrosion prevention, and chemical production. Soft X-ray spectroscopies offer powerful element- and chemical-state-specific information with the required nm-scale interface sensitivity, but have traditionally required high vacuum conditions, impeding studies of interfaces under realistic liquid- and gas-phase environments.1
    Here we introduce several membrane-based approaches developed in recent years in order to bridge this pressure gap, enabling operando x-ray photoelectron and absorption spectroscopy (XPS/XAS) of solid-liquid and solid-gas interfaces at atmospheric pressures.2–5 These rely on reaction cells sealed with X-ray/electron-transparent membranes, that can sustain large pressure drops to the high-vacuum measurement chamber.2,3 Thin (<100 nm) silicon nitride membranes are commercially available and transparent to even soft X-rays, whilst graphene membranes have thicknesses below the inelastic mean free path of photoelectrons (typically < 2 nm) and yet remain highly impermeable to gases and liquids.4 We show how these membrane-based approaches can be applied to study the chemical evolution of solid-liquid interfaces under electrochemical control, including the oxidation/reduction of Ni electrodes,5 and the solid-electrolyte interphase formation on Li-ion battery anodes. The extension of soft x-ray spectroscopies to liquid and atmospheric pressure gas environments is expected to be valuable for the study of a wide range of interfacial reactions across the electrochemical and catalytic sciences.
    Lecture
  • Date:24TuesdaySeptember 2019

    Algebraic Geometry and Representation Theory Seminar

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:30
    Title
    Noncommutative Catalan numbers
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 155
    Lecturer
    Arkady Berenstein
    University of Oregon
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of The goal of my talk (based on joint work with Vladimir Retak...»
    The goal of my talk (based on joint work with Vladimir Retakh) is to introduce noncommutative analogs of Catalan numbers c_n which belong to the free Laurent polynomial algebra L_n in n generators. Our noncommutative Catalan numbers C_n admit interesting (commutative and noncommutative) specializations, one of them related to Garsia-Haiman (q,t)-versions, another -- to solving noncommutative quadratic equations. We also establish total positivity of the corresponding (noncommutative) Hankel matrices H_n and introduce two kinds of noncommutative binomial coefficients which are instrumental in computing the inverse of H_n and its positive factorizations, and other combinatorial identities involving C_n.
    If time permits, I will explain the relationship of the C_n with the:

    1. noncommutative Laurent Phenomenon, which was previously established for Kontsevich rank 2 recursions and all marked surfaces

    2. noncommutative orthogonal polynomials, which can be viewed as noncommutative determinants of an extended matrix H_n.
    Lecture
  • Date:24TuesdaySeptember 2019

    Scientific Council meeting

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    Time
    14:00 - 16:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Contact
    Academic Events
  • Date:25WednesdaySeptember 2019

    Mapping and designing metabolic interactions in microbial communities

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Daniel Segrè
    Bioinformatics Program, Department of Biology, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Physics, Co-Director of the BU ARC on Systems Biology of Microbiomes, Boston University, USA
    Organizer
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:26ThursdaySeptember 2019

    "Acoustic Enrichment of Extracellular Vesicles from Biological Fluids"

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    Time
    09:30 - 11:30
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Agnes Michanek Ph.D
    Customer Application Manager
    Organizer
    Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Agenda: 9:30-9:45 Refreshments and greetings 9:45-1...»
    Agenda:
    9:30-9:45 Refreshments and greetings

    9:45-10:30 Technical introduction -explore the AcouTrap and its unique advantages by Agnes Michanek Ph.D, Customer Application Manager

    10:30-11:30 System demo -Scientists who wish to try the AcouTrap on their own samples, please contact Sagi.
    Lecture
  • Date:26ThursdaySeptember 2019

    Solar Photovoltaics: Recent Progress & Future Potential

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Prof. Martin Green
    Australian Centre for Advanced Photovoltaics University of New South Wales, Sydney
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The last five years have seen major reductions in silicon so...»
    The last five years have seen major reductions in silicon solar module prices, with these dropping at a compounded rate approaching 20%/year over this period, with even more dramatic reductions in bids for bulk electricity supply through Power Purchase Agreements, to values as low as US$16.88/MWh. On the technology front, there have been substantial improvements in module energy conversion efficiency through displacement of established cell technology by the UNSW-invented and -developed PERC cell, complemented by the introduction of multi-busbar, half-cell and shingled modules. The introduction of PERC cells also allows low-cost fabrication of bifacially responsive modules, set to further boost effective efficiencies. These developments position photovoltaics to make a major impact on global CO2 omissions. A recent international study describes a technological path to a zero-carbon future by 2050 by transformation across all major energy sectors including not only electricity, but also heat, transport and industrial processes. This transformation is driven primarily by solar, with 63TW capacity calculated as required globally by this date, complemented by 8TW of wind, in the process creating 35 million direct energy jobs.

    Lecture
  • Date:26ThursdaySeptember 2019

    Geometric Functional Analysis and Probability Seminar

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    Time
    13:30 - 15:30
    Title
    Random Cayley graphs
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 155
    Lecturer
    Jonathan Hermon
    Cambridge
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of We consider the random Cayley graph of a finite group $G$ fo...»
    We consider the random Cayley graph of a finite group $G$ formed by picking $k$ random generators uniformly at random:

    (1) We prove universality of cutoff (for the random walk) and a concentration of measure phenomenon in the Abelian setup (namely, that all but $o(|G|)$ elements lie at distance $in [R-o(R),R o(R)]$ from the origin, where $R$ is the minimal ball in $mathbb{Z}^k$ of size at least $|G|$), provided $k gg 1$ is large in terms of

    $mathrm{rank}(G)$. As conjectured by Aldous and Diaconis, the cutoff time is independent of the algebraic structure (it is given by the time at which the entropy of a random walk on $mathbb{Z}^k$ is $log |G|$).

    (2) We prove analogous results for the Heisenberg $H_{p,d}$ groups of $d imes d$ uni-upper triangular matrices with entries defined mod $p$, for $p$ prime and $d$ fixed or diverging slowly.

    (3) Lastly, we resolve a conjecture of D. Wilson that if $G$ is a group of size at most $2^d$ then for all its mixing time in this model is as rapid as that of $mathbb{Z}_2^d$ and likewise, that the slowest mixing $p$-group of a given size is $mathbb{Z}_p$.

    (Joint work with Sam Thomas.)
    Lecture
  • Date:26ThursdaySeptember 2019

    The End of The End: Characterizing degradation pathways recognizing protein termini

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    Time
    14:00
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Itay Koren
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    Lecture

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