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  • Date:26SundayMay 201927MondayMay 2019

    Symposium on Big Data in Healthcare, a partnership between Weizmann Institute of Science and Nature Medicine

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Chairperson
    Eran Segal
    Homepage
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:26SundayMay 2019

    Neuronal membrane proteasomes and their released extracellular peptides modulate nervous system signaling

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Seth S. Margolis
    Dept of Biological Chemistry The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore MD
    Organizer
    Department of Neurobiology
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Dr.Ivo Spiegel ivo.spiegel@weizmann.ac.il tel: 4415 ...»
    Host: Dr.Ivo Spiegel ivo.spiegel@weizmann.ac.il tel: 4415
    For assistance with accessibility issues, please contact naomi.moses@weizmann.ac.il
    AbstractShow full text abstract about In mammals, activity-dependent changes in neuronal function ...»
    In mammals, activity-dependent changes in neuronal function require coordinated regulation of the protein synthesis and protein degradation machinery. However, the biochemical evidence for this balance and coordination is largely lacking. To investigate this we initially used acute metabolic radiolabeling of stimulated primary mouse neurons to follow the fate of polypeptides being newly synthesized. We observed polypeptides being newly translated exclusively during neuronal stimulation were rapidly degraded by the neuronal membrane proteasome (NMP) and not the cytosolic proteasome. This turnover correlated with enhanced production of NMP-derived peptides into the extracellular space which have the capacity to mediate neuronal signaling in part through NMDA receptors. Using in-depth, global, and unbiased mass spectrometry, we identified the nascent protein substrates of the NMP. Among these substrates, we found that immediate-early gene products c-Fos and Npas4 were targeted to the NMP during ongoing activity-dependent protein synthesis. Moreover, we found that turnover of nascent polypeptides and not full-length proteins through the NMP occurred independent of canonical ubiquitylation pathways. We propose that these findings generally define a neuronal activity-induced protein homeostasis program of coordinated protein synthesis and degradation through the NMP. This generates a new modality of neuronal signaling in the form of extracellular peptides with potential significance for our understanding of nervous system development and function.
    Lecture
  • Date:26SundayMay 2019

    Fluid Flow Far From Equilibrium: From Shear Thinning to the Glass Transition

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Prof. Mark Robbins
    Dept. Physics, Johns Hopkins University
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Soft Matter and Biomaterials
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The talk will describe nonlinear rheology in extreme conditi...»
    The talk will describe nonlinear rheology in extreme conditions that change fluid structure and flow mechanisms. Elongational flow of entangled polymers produces near complete molecular alignment but only changes the viscosity by an order of magnitude and does not destroy the confining tube. A transition in the mechanism of shear thinning in lubricants from alignment to thermal activation is shown to be generic and allows simulations to examine whether the viscosity diverges at a finite glass transition temperature.
    Lecture
  • Date:26SundayMay 2019

    Mixing and Unmixing in Planets

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    David Stevenson
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:26SundayMay 2019

    Departmental Seminar

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    Time
    13:00 - 14:00
    Title
    Developing a highly sensitive CRISPR based platform for virus and host functional genomics
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Yaara Finkel
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:26SundayMay 2019

    Imaging the human brain: ultra-high field MRI and new biomarkers

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    Time
    13:00
    Location
    Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Drory Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Rita Schmidt
    Department of Neurobiology, WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Physics of Complex Systems
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Times New Roman (Headings CS) ...»
    Times New Roman (Headings CS)
    Lecture
  • Date:26SundayMay 2019

    Beta cell workload and type 2 diabetes risk

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    Time
    15:00 - 16:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Benjamin Glaser
    Endocrinology and Metabolism Dept. Department of Internal Medicine Hadassah,Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel
    Organizer
    Life Sciences
    Metabollic Research Forum
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:27MondayMay 2019

    Creating plant molecular factories for nutritional and industrial carotenoid production

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    Time
    09:30 - 10:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Paul Fraser
    School of Biological Sciences, Plant Molecular Sciences, Centre for Systems and Synthetic Biology, Royal Holloway, University of London, UK
    Organizer
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Prof. Asaph Aharoni...»
    Host: Prof. Asaph Aharoni
    Lecture
  • Date:27MondayMay 2019

    Life Science Colloquium

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Title
    Leptin and the Endocrine Control of Food Intake and Body Weight
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Jeffrey Friedman
    Wolf Prize Laureate 2019 Rockefeller University New York, USA
    Organizer
    Life Sciences
    Contact
    Colloquia
  • Date:27MondayMay 2019

    IMM Student seminar- Dominik Schmiedel (Dr. Ziv Shulman’s lab), Keren Gavish (Prof. Idit Shachar’s lab)

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    Time
    13:00 - 14:00
    Location
    Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Auditorium
    Organizer
    Department of Immunology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:27MondayMay 2019

    Life Science Lectures - Emerging imaging technologies to study cell architecture, dynamics and function

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz
    Senior Group Leader Janelia Research Campus
    Organizer
    Life Sciences
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host : Prof. Zvulun Elazar Light refreshments will be serve...»
    Host : Prof. Zvulun Elazar
    Light refreshments will be served at 13:40 in the lobby
    Lecture
  • Date:27MondayMay 2019

    Foundations of Computer Science Seminar

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    Time
    14:30 - 16:00
    Title
    Distributed Property Testing -- Progress and Challenges
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 155
    Lecturer
    Rotem Oshman
    Tel Aviv University
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of In this talk I will describe some recent work on distributed...»
    In this talk I will describe some recent work on distributed property testing in the networks with bounded bandwidth (the CONGEST model): we have a network of computing nodes communicating over some initially-unknown network graph, where every communication link can carry a bounded number of bits per round. Some simple-looking problems, such as checking if the network contains a 4-cycle, are known to be very hard in this model, and this motivates us to consider property testing instead of exact solutions.

    I will describe distributed property testing algorithms for two problems: subgraph-freeness, where we wish to determine whether the network graph contains some fixed constant-sized subgraph H
    Lecture
  • Date:28TuesdayMay 2019

    Heart regeneration in mammals: Cardiomyocyte renewal and beyond

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    Time
    09:00 - 10:00
    Title
    Stem Cells, Regeneration and Aging Breakfast Seminar
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Prof. Eldad Tzahor
    Department of Molecular Cellular Biology, Weizmann Institute
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:28TuesdayMay 2019

    Revealing the dynamic stability of fusion pores in giant vesicles through live, super-resolution microscopy

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    Time
    10:00 - 10:15
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Tom Biton
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences-WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Exocytosis occurs in all living cells and is essential for m...»
    Exocytosis occurs in all living cells and is essential for many cellular processes including metabolism, signaling, and trafficking. During exocytosis, cargo loaded vesicles dock and fuse with the plasma membrane to release their content. To accommodate different cargos and cellular needs exocytosis must occur across scales; From synaptic vesicles that are only ~50nm in diameter, and neuroendocrine vesicles that are in the ~500nm range to giant secretory vesicles filled with viscous cargo, such as in the acinar cells in the exocrine pancreas, that reach up to a few µm in diameter. Yet, how fusion and content release are adapted to remain function across these scales is not well understood. It is well established that during exocytosis of small vesicles, vesicle fusion can proceed through one of two pathways: The first is complete incorporation, when the vesicular membrane fuses to the target membrane and the fusion pore expand irreversibly, incorporating the vesicular membrane into the target membrane. The second is “kiss-and-run”, when the fusion pore flickers, opening briefly and collapsing rapidly into two separate membranes. I am interested in understanding how exocytosis occurs in giant vesicles witch challenge efficient secretion and membrane homeostasis due to their massive size and viscous content. I am using the salivary gland of D. Melanogaster, as a model system for giant vesicles secretion. The vesicles in the gland measure between 5-8 µm, fuse and secrete viscous content into a preformed lumen. To visualize the secretion process, I adapted a method for super-resolution microscopy to live-gland imaging. I observed that fusion pores of giant vesicles expand to a stable opening of up to 3µm and slowly constricts down to hundreds of nm or less during secretion. Because constricting a membrane pore from “infinity” in molecular terms, back to a very narrow ‘stalk’ demands an investment of energy, I hypothesized that this is mediated by a specialized protein machinery. I am currently screening for the components of the machinery using the enormous power of Drosophila genetics by taking a candidate gene approach. My preliminary results identify the BAR domain containing protein, MIM (missing in metastasis) as a key regulator of pore dynamics, leading to new and exciting insights into the molecular mechanism of cellular secretion and membrane homeostasis in live tissues.
    Lecture
  • Date:28TuesdayMay 2019

    Finding a Needle: Correlative Light and Volume EM Approach to Resolve Vesicular Fusion

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    Time
    10:15 - 10:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Nadav Scher
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences-WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Most biological phenomena must be studied across scales, ran...»
    Most biological phenomena must be studied across scales, ranging from entire organisms to molecules in cells. However, bridging these scales can often be challenging, especially if dynamic changes in protein composition must be examined together with changes in cellular organization and ultrastructure. To overcome these challenges, we are developing an imaging approach harnessing the strengths of fluorescence microscopy and large volume electron microscopy, which can be achieved with a focused ion beam scanning electron microscope (FIB/SEM). In my talk, I will present the state-of-the-art in our correlative light and volume electron microscopy workflow and demonstrate its application for the study of secretion in the fruit fly’s salivary gland.
    Lecture
  • Date:28TuesdayMay 2019

    Synthetic interferon receptors transmit biological signals using artificial ligands

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    Time
    10:30 - 10:45
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Eyal Zoler
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences-WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Interferons (IFNs) were the first cytokines discovered over ...»
    Interferons (IFNs) were the first cytokines discovered over half a century ago as agents that interfere with viral infection. IFNs have been established as pleiotropic, multifunctional proteins in the early immune response. They exhibit antiviral and antiproliferative effects, in addition to various immunomodulatory activities. Human type I IFN family consists of 16 members, all acting through the same cell surface receptors, IFNAR1 and IFNAR2. Here, we show that synthetic interferon receptors can activate the Jak/Stat pathway using non-physiological ligands. High affinity GFP and mCherry nanobodies were fused to transmembrane and intracellular domains of the receptors in attempt to perform in-vivo and in-vitro biophysical assays. This will help in better understanding the structure - function relationship of the receptors and their associated ligands.
    Lecture
  • Date:28TuesdayMay 2019

    Systems-Level Control of Structural Hierarchy

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Prof. Robert Macfarlane
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, MIT
    Organizer
    Department of Organic Chemistry
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Structural hierarchy is a powerful design concept where spec...»
    Structural hierarchy is a powerful design concept where specific geometric motifs are used to influence material structure across multiple size regimes. These complex levels of organization are typically achieved in the laboratory by conceptually breaking a material down into the smallest components that can be manipulated (e.g. individual molecules, macromolecules, or nanoparticles), and manipulating the thermodynamics of chemical bonding between those components to control how they build up into larger length scale patterns. Conversely, complex assemblies in natural systems are commonly achieved through a more holistic approach where assembly behaviors at the molecular, nano, and macroscopic scales are interlinked. This means that not only does structural information contained in molecular building blocks filter upwards to dictate material form at the nano to macroscopic levels, but also that the environment created by the larger length scale features can affect the behavior of individual components. Here, we will discuss two different methods to synthesize materials in a systems-focused approach that mimics nature's ability to general complex structural motifs across a wide range of size regimes. The first uses nanoscale design handles to deliberately control the multivalent assembly of particle-grafted supramolecular binding moieties, where control over both molecular and nanostructure of material building blocks is then used to manipulate the mesoscale structure of the resulting materials. The second uses macroscopic interfaces to dictate the assembly behavior of DNA-grafted nanoparticles, generating superlattice architectures with controlled sizes, shapes, and orientations. Together, these techniques allow for systems-level approaches to materials design, expanding our ability to program hierarchical ordering at the molecular, nano, and macroscale simultaneously.
    Lecture
  • Date:28TuesdayMay 2019

    Algebraic Geometry and Representation Theory Seminar

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:30
    Title
    Virasoro Lie algebra and its relatives in the super-world
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 155
    Lecturer
    Maria Gorelik
    Weizmann
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of This will be a very introductory talk about Virasoro Lie alg...»
    This will be a very introductory talk about Virasoro Lie algebra and its super-analogues: Ramond and Neveu-Schwarz Lie superalgebras.
    Lecture
  • Date:28TuesdayMay 2019

    How electron cryotomography is opening a new window into cell biology

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    Time
    11:30 - 12:30
    Title
    Joint Seminar - Plant and Environmental Sciences Dept. and Structural Biology Dept.
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Grant Jensen
    Professor of Biology and Biophysics Howard Hughes Medical Institute, HHMI California Institute of Technology, CALTECH, USA
    Organizer
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Joint Seminar
    Homepage
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Dr. Assaf Gal...»
    Host: Dr. Assaf Gal
    Lecture
  • Date:28TuesdayMay 2019

    Structural biology studies of a large DNA repair complex

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Dr. Michael Latham
    Texas Tech University
    Organizer
    Department of Structural Biology
    Contact
    Lecture

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