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  • Date:26WednesdayJanuary 2022

    M.Sc thesis defense: Characterization of anisotropic strain in anelstic materials by Raman spectroscopy

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    Time
    11:30 - 12:30
    Lecturer
    Daniel Freidson
    Prof. Igor Lubomirsky's group
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Zoom Link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96430042316?pwd=cjJ...»
    Zoom Link:
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96430042316?pwd=cjJwdFUrSEE5VnU4eVNuY08wZ1F3QT09

    Raman spectroscopy is used as a primary non-destructive tool for characterization of strain in thin films. It is based on the concept of the mode Grüneisen parameter, which is the ratio between the relative change in the energy of a given vibrational mode and the relative change in the unit cell volume. It has been recently reported (Kraynis et al.) that under biaxial strain, doped CeO2-films exhibit values of the mode Grüneisen parameter, which are up to 40% smaller than the bulk literature value. Doped CeO2-films are strongly anelastic, posing a question on the relation between Raman scattering frequency and anelastic strain. This work describes the way to separate anelastic and elastic contributions to the Grüneisen parameter of doped ceria thin films and show that this concept remains applicable, if only the elastic part of the strain must be taken into account. As a reference, I deposited a purely elastic yittria thin film by sputter deposition and calculated its Grüneisen parameter in a similar way. The experimental and literature values of the yittria Grüneisen parameter were found compatible, confirming that for purely elastic strain, Grüneisen parameter concept is fully applicable.
    Lecture
  • Date:27ThursdayJanuary 2022

    Cancer is a disease of epigenetic stochasticity

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Andrew(Andy) Feinberg
    Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of Medicine, Biomedical Engineering, and Mental Health, Johns Hopkins University
    Organizer
    Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Cancer Research Club
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2...»
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09
    Lecture
  • Date:30SundayJanuary 2022

    Zoom: M.Sc thesis defense: "Investigation of the ceramic – polymer interface in composite solid electrolyte by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy"

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    Time
    13:00 - 14:00
    Lecturer
    Chen Oppenheim
    M.Sc student of Dr. Michal Leskes
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/97328767376?pwd=MkZoQ0hmbVVRank0b...»
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/97328767376?pwd=MkZoQ0hmbVVRank0bzkxbGpqSUdYUT09
    passcode: 891716

    Lithium-ion batteries with liquid electrolytes are commonly employed for powering portable electronic devices. To expand the range of applications where Li ions batteries can be used (e.g., electric transportation), solid electrolytes are considered as a safer alternative to the liquid electrolytes and they may enable use of lithium metal anodes. In this study we focused on composite solid electrolytes which are based on solid polymer (Polyethylene Oxide) and ceramic particles (Li1.5Al0.5Ge1.5P3O12, LAGP). Previous studies revealed that the highest ionic conduction path in the composites is through the interface polymer - ceramic interface. However, the chemical nature of the interface and the reason for its higher conductivity remains unclear. We aim to gain molecular - atomic level insight into the nature of the polymer - ceramic interface from solid state NMR spectroscopy. Here, I will present the development of a solid - state NMR approach that can potentially be used to selectively probe the interface. To gain sensitivity and selectivity Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP), a process in which high polarization from unpaired electrons is transferred to surrounding nuclear spins will be employed. Several metal ion dopants were tested for their DNP performance in LAGP powder, and Mn2+ ions were further examined in their efficacy in the composite electrolyte. The approach was tested for selectively enhancing the NMR signal of the PEO - LAGP interface. Electrochemical characterization and in - depth solid state NMR studies provided insight into the performance of the composite and degradation processes in the composite.
    Lecture
  • Date:01TuesdayFebruary 2022

    M. Magaritz Memorial Lecture: The storyline approach to the construction of useable climate information at the local scale.

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    Time
    11:00
    Lecturer
    Ted Shepherd
    Department of Meteorology University of Reading
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of The standard approach to the production of climate informati...»
    The standard approach to the production of climate information is probabilistic in nature, with quantified uncertainties. There is a growing awareness of the limitations of this approach from the perspective of practical useability for decision-making, which has led to the emergence of more narrative-based or ‘storyline’ approaches. In this talk I will explain the rationale behind the storyline approach to the construction of useable climate information at the local scale, and discuss how it can be used to frame climate evidence in the context of adaptation.
    Lecture
  • Date:01TuesdayFebruary 2022

    New metabolic functions can rapidly evolve in microbes by multiple convergent mechanisms

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    Time
    11:30 - 12:30
    Title
    Special Guest Seminar with Dr. Avihu Yona via zoom
    Location
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/95436548996?pwd=Uk9yOVFrK0ZuTnRsdm5TY1JiM1NzQT09 Meeting ID: 954 3654 8996 Password: 356165
    Lecturer
    Dr. Avihu Yona
    Faculty of Agriculture The Hebrew University
    Organizer
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Dr. David Zeevi...»
    Host: Dr. David Zeevi
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Many plant foods contain oxalate C2O4(-2) that reaches the c...»
    Many plant foods contain oxalate C2O4(-2) that reaches the colon when we eat plant foods.
    When oxalate reaches high concentrations it can crystalize together with Ca+2 to form kidney stones. Humans don’t have enzymes to degrade oxalate, but microbes do. Therefore oxalate-degrading probiotics are a potential treatment for hyperoxaluria.
    Since clinical trials with oxalate-degrading microbes, like Oxalobacter Formigenes, could not show oxalate reduction, additional microbes that can degrade oxalate are of high interest, especially those that can perform in the human gut.
    In my talk I will describe how we harnessed lab evolution to develop novel gut microbes that can degrade oxalate. We obtained E. coli isolates from the stool of human volunteers and evolved them to metabolize oxalate in an anaerobic chamber.
    While no E. coli is known to utilize oxalate, our isolates evolved robust growth on oxalate as a sole source of carbon and energy. In my talk I will present findings on the genetic and molecular mechanism underlying this evolution.
    Lecture
  • Date:01TuesdayFebruary 2022

    Theory of neural perturbome

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    Time
    12:30
    Title
    ZOOM
    Lecturer
    Prof. Claudia Clopath
    Department of Bioengineering Imperial College London, UK
    Organizer
    Department of Brain Sciences
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Seminar via Zoom Link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/9540689...»
    Seminar via Zoom

    Link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/95406893197?pwd=REt5L1g3SmprMUhrK3dpUDJVeHlrZz09

    Meeting ID: 954 0689 3197
    Password: 750421

    Host: Dr. Takashi Kawashima takashi.kawashima@weizmann.ac.il
    tel: 2995
    AbstractShow full text abstract about To unravel the functional properties of the brain, we need t...»
    To unravel the functional properties of the brain, we need to
    untangle how neurons interact with each other and coordinate in
    large-scale recurrent networks. One way to address this question is
    to measure the functional influence of individual neurons on each
    other by perturbing them in vivo. Application of such single-neuron
    perturbations in mouse visual cortex has recently revealed feature-
    specific suppression between excitatory neurons, despite the presence
    of highly specific excitatory connectivity, which was deemed to
    underlie feature-specific amplification. Here, we studied which connectivity
    profiles are consistent with these seemingly contradictory
    observations, by modeling the effect of single-neuron perturbations
    in large-scale neuronal networks. Our numerical simulations and
    mathematical analysis revealed that, contrary to the prima facie
    assumption, neither inhibition dominance nor broad inhibition
    alone were sufficient to explain the experimental findings; instead,
    strong and functionally specific excitatory–inhibitory connectivity
    was necessary, consistent with recent findings in the primary visual
    cortex of rodents. Such networks had a higher capacity to encode
    and decode natural images, and this was accompanied by the emergence
    of response gain nonlinearities at the population level. Our
    study provides a general computational framework to investigate
    how single-neuron perturbations are linked to cortical connectivity
    and sensory coding and paves the road to map the perturbome of
    neuronal networks in future studies.
    Zoom Link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/95406893197?pwd=REt5L1g3SmprMUhrK3dpUDJVeHlrZz09
    Meeting ID: 954 0689 3197
    Password: 750421


    Lecture
  • Date:01TuesdayFebruary 2022

    Precise Patterning in the Mammalian Inner Ear

    More information
    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/92237061730?pwd=M1Z6OGZabEsvbXVJOEMyRHJFTys2dz09
    Lecturer
    Prof. David Sprinzak
    School of Neurobiology, Biochemistry and Biophysics, Faculty of Life Sciences, TAU
    Organizer
    Department of Chemical and Structural Biology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:02WednesdayFebruary 2022

    Algebraic Geometry and Representation Theory Seminar

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    Time
    17:00 - 18:00
    Title
    Number of irreducible representations in the cuspidal automorphic spectrum
    Lecturer
    Hongjie Yu
    IST Austria
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Seminar, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Seminar, Department of Mathematics
    Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Let G be a reductive group defined and deployed over a globa...»
    Let G be a reductive group defined and deployed over a global function field. We are interested in the sum of multiplicities of irreducible representations containing a regular depth zero representation of G(O), where O is the ring of integral adeles, in the automorphic cuspidal spectrum. The sum is given in terms of the number of F_q-points of Hitchin moduli spaces of groups associated to G. When G=GL(n), it implies some cases of a conjecture of Deligne by Langlands correspondence. In this talk, I will mainly focus on the case of GL(n).

    Seminar in zoom only:
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/98304397425
    Lecture
  • Date:03ThursdayFebruary 2022

    Skin stem cells in tissue regeneration and tumor formation

    More information
    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Yaron Fuchs
    Laboratory of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Biology, Technion Israel Institute of Technology. Lorry Lokey Interdisciplinary Center for Life Sciences & Engineering, Technion Israel Institute of Technology
    Organizer
    Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Cancer Research Club
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2...»
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09
    Lecture
  • Date:06SundayFebruary 2022

    Zoom: "A Faster Path to Solar Fuels: New Approaches for Highly Efficient Materials for Photoelectrochemical Energy Conversion

    More information
    Time
    12:00 - 13:00
    Lecturer
    Dr. Ronen Gottesman
    Institute for Solar Fuels, Helmholtz Center for Materials and Energy, Berlin
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Zoom: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/95703489711?pwd=Tyt5cU1tV...»

    Zoom: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/95703489711?pwd=Tyt5cU1tV2YrMFhYUytBU001bm4yQT09


    Viable, global-scale photoelectrochemical energy conversion of cheap, abundant resources such as water into chemical fuels (“solar fuels”) depends on the progress of semiconducting light-absorbers with good carrier transport properties, suitable band edge positions, and stability in direct-semiconductor/electrolyte junctions. Investigations concentrated mainly on metal-oxides that offer good chemical stability yet suffer from poor charge transport than non-oxide semiconductors (e.g., Si, GaAs). Fortunately, only a fraction of the possible ternary and quaternary combinations (together ~ 105 – 106 combinations) were studied, making it likely that the best materials are still awaiting discovery. Unfortunately, designing controlled synthesis routes of single-phase oxides with low defects concentration will become more difficult as the number of elements increases; and 2) there are currently no robust and proven strategies for identifying promising multi-elemental systems.
    These challenges demand initial focusing on synthesis parameters of novel non-equilibrium synthesis approaches rather than chemical composition parameters by high-throughput combinatorial investigations of synthesis-parameter spaces. This would open new avenues for stabilizing metastable materials, discovering new chemical spaces, and obtaining light-absorbers with enhanced properties to study their physical working mechanisms in photoelectrochemical energy conversion.
    I will introduce an approach to exploring non-equilibrium synthesis-parameter spaces by forming gradients in synthesis-parameters without modifying composition-parameters, utilizing two non-equilibrium synthesis components: pulsed laser deposition and rapid radiative-heating. Their combination enables reproducible, high-throughput combinatorial synthesis, resulting in high-resolution observation and analysis. Even minor changes in synthesis can impact significantly material properties, physical working mechanisms, and performances, as demonstrated by studies of the relationship between synthesis conditions, crystal structures of α-SnWO4, and properties over a range of thicknesses of CuBi2O4, both emerging light-absorbers for photoelectrochemical water-splitting that were used as model multinary oxides.

    Lecture
  • Date:06SundayFebruary 2022

    Environmental challenges and opportunities in the Red Sea - the last coral reef standing?

    More information
    Time
    13:00 - 14:00
    Title
    Sustainability and Energy Research Initiative lecture series
    Location
    via zoom
    Lecturer
    Prof. Maoz Fine
    Dept. of Ecology, Evolution & Behavior The Hebrew University of Jerusalem The Interuniversity Insititute for Marine Science, Eilat
    Organizer
    Feinberg Graduate School
    Alternative Sustainable Energy Research Initiative (AERI)
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Prof. Ron Milo, SAERI Scientific Director zoom link: ...»
    Host: Prof. Ron Milo, SAERI Scientific Director
    zoom link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96403201939?pwd=bGlzcGFZKzhXZ1VPYW5MZUFVTDNSQT09
    Meeting ID: 964 0320 1939
    Password: 12345
    Lecture
  • Date:06SundayFebruary 2022

    Department of Molecular Genetics departmental seminar

    More information
    Time
    13:00 - 14:00
    Title
    “Uncovering import pathways of mitochondrial proteins with unconventional targeting signals.” and “Capturing the Mammalian Bilaminar Disc”
    Location
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/93234264078?pwd=Rm45ZmN3aDFOWmphYndyRFFWR3hTdz09
    Lecturer
    Yury Bykov and Oldak Bernardo
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Joint Seminar
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:07MondayFebruary 2022

    Chemistry Colloquium (hybrid)

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Prof. Uri Banin
    Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
    Organizer
    Faculty of Chemistry
    Homepage
    Contact
    Colloquia
  • Date:10ThursdayFebruary 2022

    International Day of Women in Science Conference

    More information
    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Chairperson
    Idit Shachar
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:13SundayFebruary 2022

    WIS-Q Seminar

    More information
    Time
    All day
    Title
    Roee Ozeri
    Organizer
    Department of Condensed Matter Physics
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:15TuesdayFebruary 2022

    Special Guest Seminar

    More information
    Time
    13:00 - 14:00
    Title
    “Mitochondrial enzymes in Toxoplasma - a complex story”
    Location
    Zoom: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96194061419?pwd=K0lmbEFHUlkzTTkxZ1daQ0
    Lecturer
    Dr. Lilach Sheiner
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:17ThursdayFebruary 2022

    Intravital microscopy of the protection mechanisms that clear mutations in intestinal and breast tissues

    More information
    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Jacco van Rheenen
    Division of Molecular Pathology, Oncode Institute, The Netherlands Cancer Institute
    Organizer
    Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Cancer Research Club
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2...»
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Lecture
  • Date:20SundayFebruary 2022

    Department of Molecular Genetics departmental seminar

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    Time
    13:00 - 14:00
    Location
    Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Assaf Biran
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    DDP Seminar
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:27SundayFebruary 2022

    "Electrified Addition and Subtraction of H2 to Simplify Synthesis"

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Dr. Samer Gnaim
    Beckman Center for Chemical Sciences The Scripps Research Institute
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Methodologies that rely on the addition and removal of molec...»
    Methodologies that rely on the addition and removal of molecular hydrogen from organic
    compounds are one of the most oft-employed transformations in modern organic chemistry,
    representing a highly relevant tactic in synthesis. Despite their overall simplicity, organic chemists
    are still pursuing sustainable and scalable processes for such transformations.
    In this regard, electrochemical techniques have long been heralded for their innate sustainability
    as efficient methods to perform redox reactions. In our first report, we discovered a new oxidative
    electrochemical process for the a,b-desaturation of carbonyl functionalities. The described
    desaturation method introduces a direct pathway to desaturated ketones, esters, lactams and
    aldehydes simply from the corresponding enol silanes/phosphates, and electricity as the primary
    reagent. This electrochemically driven desaturation exhibits high functional group tolerance, is
    easily scalable (1–100 g), and can be predictably implemented into synthetic pathways using
    experimentally or computationally derived NMR shifts.
    Our second report demonstrated the reductive electrochemical cobalt-hydride generation for
    synthetic organic applications inspired by the well-established cobalt-catalyzed hydrogen
    evolution chemistry. We have developed a silane- and peroxide-free electrochemical cobalthydride
    generation for formal hydrogen atom transfer reactions reliant on the combination of a
    simple proton source and electricity as the hydride surrogate. Thus, a versatile range of tunable
    reactivities involving alkenes and alkynes can be realized with unmatched efficiency and
    chemoselectivity, such as isomerization, selective E/Z alkyne reduction, hydroarylation,
    hydropyridination, strained ring expansion, and hydro-Giese.
    Lecture
  • Date:01TuesdayMarch 2022

    To be announced

    More information
    Time
    12:30
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Alex L. Kolodkin
    JHU
    Organizer
    Department of Brain Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture

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