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  • Date:20FridayApril 2018

    : “Structure of the ribosome from the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and its’ complex various antibacterial compounds”

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    Time
    09:30
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Zohar Eyal
    Ph.D. student of Prof. Ada Yonath WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Structural Biology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:22SundayApril 2018

    The 31th meeting of the ISRAELI SOCIETY FOR MASS SPECTROMETRY

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Chairperson
    Asaph Aharoni
    Homepage
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:22SundayApril 2018

    Precariously Balanced Rocks provide new constraints for Negev seismic hazard analysis

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    Time
    11:00
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Yaron Finzi
    Dead-Sea and Arava Science Center
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Precariously Balanced Rocks (PBR) cannot withstand strong gr...»
    Precariously Balanced Rocks (PBR) cannot withstand strong ground motion. When a strong earthquake occurs in their vicinity they are likely to break or topple. By evaluating the stability of PBR and determining their age, it is possible to constrain the maximum ground motions that occurred at PBR sites during their life time. This methodology has been proven as effective in determining the maximal earthquake magnitude of faults in the USA, and has been applied to improve both deterministic and probabilistic seismic hazard analysis. In the Negev, slender, in-situ, slenderrock pillars constitute a particularly important subset of PPRs as their seismically induced motion may be amplified. This amplification occurs in pillars with a natural frequency of 1-10 Hz, corresponding to dominant seismic wave frequency away from the source rupture of earthquakes.
    In the Negev, several pillars that were found to be ~10,000 years old, were used to explore potential implications for constraining the maximum magnitude of earthquakes along the Negev-Sinai Sear Zone faults and the Arava Fault. We show that assuming a plausible amplification of motion, the pillar analysis may yield strong constraints on fault seismicity parameters and may indicate a need to re-evaluate ground acceleration maps. Ongoing dating and stability analysis of PBR and pillars may therefore provide important new insights for regional seismic hazard studies.
    Lecture
  • Date:22SundayApril 2018

    The many faces of the Fisher-KPP equation

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:30
    Location
    Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Bernard Derrida
    Collège de France, Paris
    Organizer
    Faculty of Physics
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of 11:00 Coffee, Tea and more ...»
    11:00 Coffee, Tea and more
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The Fisher KPP equation describes the growth of a stable reg...»
    The Fisher KPP equation describes the growth of a stable region into
    an unstable medium.
    It was introduced in 1937 both by the biologist and statistician
    Fisherand by the mathematicians Kolmogorov, Petrovsky, Piscounov to describe the propagation of a favorable gene in a population.
    It is one of the classical examples of the problem of velocity selection. It also appears in many other contexts, ranging from the theory of disordered systems and spin glasses to reaction diffusion problems, branching Brownian motion and models of evolution with selection.
    This talk will try to review the main classical results on this equation as well as some recent progress.


    Colloquia
  • Date:22SundayApril 2018

    Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2017-2018

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    Time
    13:00
    Title
    Targeting Biomineralization to Combat Antibiotic Resistant Biofilm Infections
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Alona keren-Paz
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Student and Post-Doc Seminar
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:23MondayApril 2018

    "Quantitative chemical imaging in vivo"

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:15
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Prof. Yamuna Krishnan
    University of Chicago
    Organizer
    Faculty of Chemistry
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Department of Chemistry & Grossman Institute of Neurosci...»
    Department of Chemistry & Grossman Institute of Neuroscience and Quantitative Biology
    The University of Chicago

    DNA can be self-assembled into molecularly precise, well-defined, synthetic assemblies on the nanoscale, commonly referred to as designer DNA nanodevices. My lab creates synthetic, chemically responsive, DNA-based fluorescent probes. (1) In 2009 my lab discovered that these designer nanodevices could function as fluorescent reporters to quantitatively image ions in real time in living systems. (2,3) Until this innovation, it was not at all obvious whether such DNA nanodevices could function inside a living cell without being interfered with, or interfering with, the cells own networks of DNA control (4). In this talk I will discuss unpublished work on how we have expanded this technology from ion imaging (5,6) to now quantitatively imaging reactive species as well as enzymatic cleavage with sub-cellular spatial resolution in vivo.

    References:

    1. Chakraborty, K., et al., Nucleic acid based nanodevices in biological imaging. Ann. Rev. Biochem., 2016 85, 349-373.
    2. Modi, S., et al. A DNA nanomachine that maps spatial and temporal pH changes in living cells. Nature Nanotechnology, 2009, 4, 325-330.
    3. Modi, S., et al. Two DNA nanomachines map pH of intersecting endocytic pathways. Nature Nanotechnology, 2013, 8, 459-467.
    4. Surana, S., et al. Designing DNA nanodevices for compatibility with the immune system of higher organisms. Nature Nanotechnology, 2015, 10, 741-747.
    5. Saha, S., et al. A pH-insensitive DNA nanodevice quantifies chloride in organelles of living cells. Nature Nanotechnology, 2015, 10, 645-651.
    6. Chakraborty, K., et al., High lumenal chloride in the lysosome is critical for lysosome function. eLife, 2017, 6, e28862.
    7. Dan, K. et al., DNA nanodevices map enzymatic activity in vivo. 2018 (in revision).
    8. Thekkan, S. et al A DNA-based fluorescent reporter maps HOCl dynamics in the maturing phagosome. 2018 (submitted)
    Colloquia
  • Date:23MondayApril 2018

    "Genomic approaches to studying cancer aneuploidy"

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Dr. Uri Ben-David
    Cancer Program, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Abstract: Cancer aneuploidy is a biological enigma and a mis...»
    Abstract: Cancer aneuploidy is a biological enigma and a missed opportunity for cancer treatment. The association between cancer and aneuploidy has been well known for decades, but there has been rather limited progress in understanding how aneuploidy contributes to cancer initiation and progression. In this talk, I will discuss my postdoctoral work that applied genomic approaches to study the relevance of aneuploidy to cancer pathogenesis. In my first study, I analyzed genetically engineered mouse models of cancer and revealed a driver-specific pattern of aneuploidy. This work narrowed down the region of interest in one of the most recurrent chromosomal changes in human breast cancer (loss of chromosome 1p), and identified a gene (Sfn) that cooperates with Erbb2 during breast cancer tumorigenesis. In a second study, I analyzed patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) and revealed distinct tumor evolution trajectories in patients and in mice. This work also identified significant associations between recurrent aneuploidies and drug response. In a third study, I analyzed cancer cell lines and revealed that the genomic instability of these models results in altered transcriptional programs and disparate drug response. This work also yielded a novel isogenic system to study cancer aneuploidy in vitro. Together, these three works shed new light on the faithfulness and stability of the most commonly used cancer models, and lay a foundation for their proper use in functional studies of cancer aneuploidy.
    Lecture
  • Date:23MondayApril 2018

    Foundations of Computer Science Seminar

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    Time
    14:30 - 16:00
    Title
    A Generalized Turan Problem and Its Applications
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 155
    Lecturer
    Lior Gishboliner
    Tel Aviv University
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:24TuesdayApril 2018

    Computational design of new and improved enzymes

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    Time
    10:00 - 10:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Olga Khersonsky
    Dept. of Biomolecular Sciences-WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Enzymes are potent biocatalysts that are widely used in biot...»
    Enzymes are potent biocatalysts that are widely used in biotechnology, but their function often has to be altered or optimized. Enzyme evolution and engineering are constrained by epistatic relationships among the positions that make up an active site. A further constraint is due to stability-function tradeoffs, whereby accumulated mutations reduce protein stability and functional expression. To address these problems, we have developed several new methods that use bioinformatics and Rosetta atomistic simulations to stabilize enzymes, improve their activity and make new enzymes by modular backbone assembly.
    Lecture
  • Date:24TuesdayApril 2018

    PAPD7: a non-canonical poly(A) RNA polymerase that regulates replication across DNA damage.

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    Time
    10:30 - 11:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Umakanta Swain
    Dept. of Biomolecular Sciences-WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) overcomes arrest of replicat...»
    Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) overcomes arrest of replication forks at DNA lesions, by allowing synthesis across the damaged sites by specialized low-fidelity TLS DNA polymerases. This prevents double-strand breaks and genomic instability at the cost of increased point mutations. An siRNA screen performed in our lab in search for novel regulatory mammalian TLS genes, identified 17 novel TLS genes, one of which was PAPD7 (Poly (A) polymerase D7), a putative non-canonical poly(A) RNA polymerase. The biological role of PAPD7 is unknown yet.
    We over-expressed and partially purified recombinant human PAPD7 and showed that it is indeed an adenylyltransferase. Measuring TLS across site-specific benzo[a]pyrene–G (BP-G), a major cigarette smoke DNA-adduct, we show that the down-regulation of PAPD7 decreased TLS across BP-G, and also decreased its mutagenicity. Further analysis showed that at least part of PAPD7 regulation of TLS is via its effect on monoubiquitination of PCNA (the DNA sliding clamp), a key step in TLS. RNA-seq analysis followed enrichment analysis showed that PAPD7 is involved in several biological functions including RNA metabolism, development, inflammation, signalling, cell cycle and DNA replication. Current studies are aimed at better understanding the molecular mechanism of TLS regulation by PAPD7.
    Lecture
  • Date:24TuesdayApril 2018

    Gel Networks As Reaction Media: Performing Air-Sensitive Photoredox Catalysis Under Aerobic Conditions

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:30
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Prof. Dr. David Díaz Díaz
    Faculty of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Institute of Organic Chemistry, University of Regensburg, Germany
    Organizer
    Department of Organic Chemistry
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:24TuesdayApril 2018

    Students Seminar

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:30
    Location
    Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Shalev Itzkovitz's lab
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Cell Biology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:24TuesdayApril 2018

    Gardens as a microcosm of global change

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    Time
    11:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer
    Dr. Lori Shapiro
    Dr. Rob R. Dunn, NCSU (Department of Applied Ecology), Dr. Roberto Kolter, Harvard Medical School (Department of Microbiology), USA
    Organizer
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Homepage
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Room 690C, Floor 6. Host: Dr. Assaf Gal...»
    Room 690C, Floor 6.
    Host: Dr. Assaf Gal
    Lecture
  • Date:25WednesdayApril 2018

    Developmental Club Series 2017-2018

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    Time
    10:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Ben-Zion Shilo
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Developmental Club
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:25WednesdayApril 2018

    Special Seminar:Tightly Linking Chemistry and Biology through Covalent Bonds

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:30
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Prof. Xiaoguang Lei
    Peking University (PKU)
    Organizer
    Department of Organic Chemistry
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Biological interactions are always weak and transient, which...»
    Biological interactions are always weak and transient, which present significant challenges for us to dissecting these processes! Therefore, biocompatible covalent bond formations (or so called ligations) may greatly facilitate the studies of these complex biological processes through turning the week and transient interactions to the strong covalent interactions. In this lecture, I will present several examples from our laboratory about how we use novel covalent small molecule probes or biocompatible ligation chemistry to dissect fundamental cellular events such as programmed cell death as well as to explore the complex protein structures and protein-protein interactions. In particular, I will focus on an emerging technology we have been actively developing over the past 5 years, chemical cross-linking of proteins coupled with mass spectrometry analysis (CXMS). I will demonstrate that how novel bioconjugation chemistry enable the new advancement of CXMS and how we apply CXMS as a powerful tool in combination of X-ray crystallography or Cryo-electron microscopy to elucidate the complex protein machinery structures and systematically map protein-protein interactions.
    Lecture
  • Date:26ThursdayApril 2018

    Vision and Robotics Seminar

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    Time
    12:15 - 13:30
    Title
    Distilled Collections and Applications
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 1
    Lecturer
    Hadar Averbuch-Elor
    Tel Aviv University
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:29SundayApril 2018

    Pancreas cancer, inflammation, and immunity: of mice and men

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    Time
    10:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Francisco X Real & Dr. Núria Malats
    Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group & Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group Spanish National Cancer Research Center-CNIO, Madrid
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Cell Biology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:29SundayApril 2018

    Molecular Characterization of Atmospheric Brown Carbon

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    Time
    11:00
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Alexander Laskin
    Purdue University
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Light-absorbing organic aerosol commonly termed as Brown car...»
    Light-absorbing organic aerosol commonly termed as Brown carbon (BrC) is a significant contributor to radiative forcing of the Earth’s climate and also is of toxicological concern. Understanding the environmental effects of BrC, its sources, formation, and aging processes requires fundamental knowledge of its chromophores and characterization of their light-absorption properties. This seminar will highlight our recent analytical chemistry developments and applications in the area of molecular-level characterization of BrC that provided first insights into diverse composition and properties of its common chromophores. We present the chemical analysis of chromophores reported in a number of case studies of BrC materials associated with emissions from biomass burning and anthropogenic secondary organic aerosols. The results show that BrC chromophores include organic molecules with various structures, polarities, and volatilities. Understanding their chemical identity requires multi-modal analysis employing complementary separation and ionization approaches in combination with high resolution mass spectrometry. These studies allow assessment of BrC optical properties and relating them to fractional contributions from different classes of chromophores such as aromatic carboxylic acids, nitro-phenols; substituted, heterocyclic and pure polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Lecture
  • Date:29SundayApril 2018

    The Israeli Electricity Market at a crossroads and its implications for renewable energies

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    Time
    13:00 - 14:00
    Title
    Sustainability And Energy Research Initiative (SAERI) Seminar Series
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Ms. Nurit Gal
    VP, the Israeli Electricity Regulatory Authority (ERA)
    Organizer
    Feinberg Graduate School
    Alternative Sustainable Energy Research Initiative (AERI)
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Prof. Ron Milo light refreshments will be served at 1...»
    Host: Prof. Ron Milo
    light refreshments will be served at 12:40
    Lecture
  • Date:30MondayApril 2018

    Modeling the initiation, progression and treatment of human melanoma in the mouse

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Title
    Special Guest Seminar
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Glenn Merlino
    NCL, NIH, USA
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    Lecture

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