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  • Date:21ThursdayMarch 2019

    Geometric Functional Analysis and Probability Seminar

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    Time
    13:30 - 15:30
    Title
    On the local limit theorem in dynamical systems
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 155
    Lecturer
    Zemer Kosloff
    HUJI
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about In 1987, Burton and Denker proved the remarkable result that...»
    In 1987, Burton and Denker proved the remarkable result that in every aperiodic dynamical systems (including irrational rotations for example) there is a square integrable, zero mean function such that its corresponding time series satisfies a CLT. Subsequently, Volny showed that one can find a function which satisfies the strong (almost sure) invariance principle. All these constructions resulted in a non-lattice distribution.

    In a joint work with Dalibor Volny we show that there exists an integer valued cocycle which satisfies the local limit theorem. The first hour will involve painting (Rokhlin towers) while the second one will be mainly concerned with the proof of the local CLT.
    Lecture
  • Date:21ThursdayMarch 2019

    Exosomal transmission between macrophages and cancer cells: new insights to sroma-mediated drug resistance

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Ziv Gil
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:24SundayMarch 2019

    Multiphase Chemistry of Organic Aerosols and Reactive Oxygen Species in the Atmosphere

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    Time
    11:00
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Manabu Shiraiwa
    UCI
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:24SundayMarch 2019

    Interfacial rheology - why, what, and how

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Lecturer
    Prof. Moshe Gottlieb
    Dept of Chemical Engineering, Ben Gurion University
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The idea that complex liquid-air interfaces laden with sur...»

    The idea that complex liquid-air interfaces laden with surfactants, colloids, or polymer molecules, possess rheological properties that differ from those of the bulk sub-phase has been suggested 150 years ago. Yet, even today we are still struggling with the means to properly measure these properties. In this talk we will first explore the reasons to worry at all about the properties of the interface, examine some of the consequences of interfacial rheology, and revisit a century old technique - the unjustifiably named “Langmuir trough”, pointing out some experimental peculiarities.
    Lecture
  • Date:25MondayMarch 201926TuesdayMarch 2019

    Big Data in Education

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Chairperson
    Giora Alexandron
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:25MondayMarch 2019

    Guest seminar- Dr. Gunnar Dittmar will lecture on "“Large-scale mapping of PTM-induced interactome changes.”

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Camelia Botnar Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Gunnar Dittmar
    Luxembourg Institute of Health, Quantitative Biology unit Proteomics of cellular signaling.
    Organizer
    Department of Immunology
    System Biology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:25MondayMarch 2019

    IMM Guest seminar- Prof.Yuval Shaked will lecture on "Therapy-induced a phenotype and functional switch in cells at the tumor microenvironment in response to therapy dictates tumor fate.""

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    Time
    13:00 - 14:00
    Location
    Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Yuval Shaked
    Cell Biology and Cancer Science Technion Integrated Cancer Center Rappaport Faculty of Medicine Technion - Israel Institute of Technology .
    Organizer
    Department of Immunology
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Almost any type of anti-cancer treatment including chemother...»
    Almost any type of anti-cancer treatment including chemotherapy, radiation, surgery and targeted drugs can induce host molecular and cellular effects which, in turn, lead to tumor outgrowth and relapse despite an initial successful therapy outcome. Tumor relapse due to host effects is attributed to pro-inflammation, angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination from the primary tumor and seeding at metastatic sites. Various bone marrow derived cells participate in this process, and many different factors are secreted from host cells in response to the therapy which then lead to tumor relapse and even resistance to therapy. The recent advances in cancer immunotherapy have significantly improved therapeutic outcomes in a subset of patients with advanced malignancies, still most patients do not respond to treatment and some even hyper progress. In my presentation, I will discuss several examples of how host cells undergo a functional and phenotype switch in response to therapy which contribute to tumor relapse and hyperprogression in response to therapy. I will also demonstrate how blocking the host pro-tumorigenic responses to therapy can minimize therapy resistance and improve therapy outcome.
    Lecture
  • Date:25MondayMarch 2019

    Hyperuniformity of driven suspensions

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    Time
    14:15
    Location
    Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Room A
    Lecturer
    Haim Diamant
    Chemistry, TAU
    Organizer
    Department of Physics of Complex Systems
    Statistical Physics Seminar
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about An arrangement of particles is said to be "hyperuniform...»
    An arrangement of particles is said to be "hyperuniform" if its density fluctuations over large distances are strongly suppressed relative to a random configuration. Crystals, for example, are hyperuniform. Recently, several disordered materials have been found to be hyperuniform. Examples are sheared suspensions and emulsions, and, possibly, random close packings of particles. We show that externally driven particles in a liquid suspension (as in sedimentation, for example) self-organize hyperuniformly in certain directions relative to the external force. This dynamic hyperuniformity arises from the long-range coupling, induced by the force and carried by the fluid, between the concentration of particles and their velocity field. We obtain the general requirements, which the coupling should satisfy in order for this phenomenon to
    occur. Under other conditions (e.g., for certain particle shapes), the
    coupling can lead to the opposite effect -- enhancement of density
    fluctuations and instability. We confirm these analytical results in a
    simple two-dimensional simulation.

    Lecture
  • Date:25MondayMarch 2019

    Foundations of Computer Science Seminar

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    Time
    14:30 - 16:00
    Title
    Homomorphic Secret Sharing
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 155
    Lecturer
    Yuval Ishai
    Technion
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of A homomorphic secret-sharing scheme is a secret-sharing sche...»
    A homomorphic secret-sharing scheme is a secret-sharing scheme that allows locally mapping shares of a secret to compact shares of a function of the secret. The talk will survey the current state of the art on homomorphic secret sharing, covering efficient constructions, applications in cryptography and complexity theory, and open questions.
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayMarch 2019

    Long noncoding RNAs in neurogenesis and neuroregeneration

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    Time
    09:00 - 10:00
    Title
    Stem Cells, Regeneration and Aging Seminar
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    To be announced
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayMarch 2019

    The mitochondrial protein Efhd1 is regulated by Liver Kinase B1 and is required for neuronal development

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    Time
    10:00 - 10:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Valeria Ulisse
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences-WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about During development, neurons need to couple their robust axon...»
    During development, neurons need to couple their robust axonal growth with their energetic balance. The mechanisms that regulate this coupling are largely unknown. Here we show that sensory neurons that lack Liver Kinase B1 (LKB1), a master regulator of energy homeostasis, exhibit reduced axonal growth and branching. Biochemical analysis of these LKB1 KO neurons revealed metabolic irregularities, manifested by axonal reduction in ATP levels. Genomic analysis uncovered downregulation in Efhd1 (EF-Hand Domain Family Member D1), a mitochondrial Ca2+-binding protein in the LKB1 KO sensory neurons. Strikingly, genetic ablation of Efhd1 caused a decrease in the axonal ATP levels and activation of the AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) pathway in sensory neurons. Moreover, we detected shortened mitochondria at the axonal growth cones and activation of the mitophagy regulator ULK (Unc-51 like autophagy activating kinase). Suggesting that Efhd1 is an important regulator of the axonal mitochondria. Notably, these metabolic dysfunctions were manifested by reduced axonal growth in vitro, and axonal branching defects and enhanced neuronal death in vivo. Overall, our work uncovers a new metabolic pathway that couples mitochondrial and axonal growth through Efhd1.
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayMarch 2019

    Kaluza – flow cytometry analysis software

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    Time
    10:15 - 13:15
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Shlomit Rak-Yahalom Rhenium
    Organizer
    Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of 10:15-11:15 - Kaluza introduction and features 11:15-12:15 ...»
    10:15-11:15 - Kaluza introduction and features
    11:15-12:15 - FCS data analysis demonstration
    12:15-13:15 - Personal fcs data analysis
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayMarch 2019

    How transcription regulates mRNA stability and why it helps cells to survive stress.

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    Time
    10:30 - 11:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Boris Slobodin
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences-WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Stability of mRNA molecules is generally considered to be an...»
    Stability of mRNA molecules is generally considered to be an intrinsic and constant feature of every distinct transcript. This study investigated the effect of transcription on the stabilities of multiple human and mouse mRNAs. We found that transcription positively regulates mRNA stability, rendering efficiently transcribed messengers less prone to degradation. Being independent of either translation or expression levels, this phenomenon is based exclusively on the co-transcriptionally deposited m6A modification, length of poly(A) tails, and the preferential activity of the CCR4-Not complex toward m6A-marked transcripts. Moreover, we demonstrate that upon large-scale transcriptional changes, such as during stress response or differentiation, the cell dynamically regulates its degradation machinery to buffer the global levels of mRNAs. We found this phenomenon to affect stabilities of virtually all tested mRNAs, thus providing transcription an additional regulatory pathway to globally impact mRNA stability. Overall, we conclude that transcription is a primary regulator of mRNA degradation in eukaryotic cells. We postulate that mRNA stability is a flexible epigenetic feature that is continuously and dynamically adjusted to transcriptional fluctuations in order to fine-tune gene expression in the ever-changing conditions.

    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayMarch 2019

    Algebraic Geometry and Representation Theory Seminar

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:30
    Title
    The Drinfeld-Gaitsgory operator on automorphic functions
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 155
    Lecturer
    Jonathan Wang
    MIT
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Let F be a function field and G a connected split reductive ...»
    Let F be a function field and G a connected split reductive group over F. We define a "strange" operator between different spaces of automorphic functions on G(A)/G(F), and show that this operator is natural from the viewpoint of the geometric Langlands program via the functions-sheaves dictionary. We discuss how to define this operator over a number field by relating it to pseudo-Eisenstein series and inversion of the standard intertwining operator. This operator is also connected to Deligne-Lusztig duality and cohomological duality of representations over a local field.
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayMarch 2019

    Mathematical Analysis and Applications Seminar

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:30
    Title
    Prediction of random and chaotic dynamics in nonlinear optics
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 1
    Lecturer
    Amir Sagiv
    Tel Aviv University
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of The prediction of interactions between nonlinear laser beams...»
    The prediction of interactions between nonlinear laser beams is a longstanding open problem. A traditional assumption is that these interactions are deterministic. We have shown, however, that in the nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLS) model of laser propagation, beams lose their initial phase information in the presence of input noise. Thus, the interactions between beams become unpredictable as well. Not all is lost, however. The statistics of many interactions are predictable by a universal model.

    Computationally, the universal model is efficiently solved using a novel spline-based stochastic computational method. Our algorithm efficiently estimates probability density functions (PDF) that result from differential equations with random input. This is a new and general problem in numerical uncertainty-quantification (UQ), which leads to surprising results and analysis at the intersection of probability and approximation theory.
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayMarch 2019

    How to build a glass house - insights into the biomolecular machinery for silica morphogenesis in diatoms

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    Time
    11:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Nils Kroeger
    B CUBE Center for Molecular Bioengineering Center for Molecular and Cellular Bioengineering (CMCB) TU Dresden, Germany
    Organizer
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Dr. Assaf Gal...»
    Host: Dr. Assaf Gal
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayMarch 2019

    Department of Molecular Genetics seminar for thesis defense

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    Time
    13:00
    Title
    “Is RPTPa a novel target that counteracts obesity?”
    Location
    Koshland Room
    Lecturer
    Yael Cohen Sharir
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Seminar
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayMarch 2019

    SOD1 structure - Toward understanding of ALS pathogenesis

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Dr. Stas Engel
    Ben Gurion University
    Organizer
    Department of Structural Biology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayMarch 2019

    A fresh old look on Vision

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    Time
    14:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Brain Research
    Lecturer
    Prof. Michael Herzog
    Brain Mind Institute, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland
    Organizer
    Department of Neurobiology
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Benoziyo Brain Research Building Room 113 Host: Prof. Dov...»
    Benoziyo Brain Research Building Room 113

    Host: Prof. Dov Sagi dov.sagi@weizmann.ac.il tel: 3747
    For assistance with accessibility issues, please contact naomi.moses@weizmann.ac.il
    AbstractShow full text abstract about In classic models of vision, vision proceeds in a hierarchic...»
    In classic models of vision, vision proceeds in a hierarchical fashion, from low-level analysis (edges and lines) to figural processing (shapes and objects). Low-level processing determines high-level processing. Here, we show that shape processing determines basic visual processing as much as the other way around. For example, we presented a vernier stimulus and asked observers to indicate its offset direction. Performance strongly deteriorated when the vernier was surrounded by a square, in line with most models of vision. Surprisingly, performance improved when more squares were added. This improvement of performance can hardly be explained by classic models of vision, which predict a further deterioration of performance. We propose that shape interactions precede low-level processing in a recurrent fashion. Using high density EEG and trans-cranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), we show how good Gestalt emerges during recurrent, unconscious processing within 420ms. The outcome of this processing, i.e., the conscious percept, determines, paradoxically, what is usually referred to as early visual processing.
    Lecture
  • Date:27WednesdayMarch 2019

    Cut along dotted line: kirigami materials and device applications

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Prof. Max Shtein
    Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Chemical Engineering; University of Michigan
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Simple 2-dimensional cut and fold patterns can be transforme...»
    Simple 2-dimensional cut and fold patterns can be transformed into 3-dimensional shapes upon stretch-ing. We use this simple approach to develop mechanical metamaterials with several interesting proper-ties and applications. I will describe ways of tuning properties via geometric structure, and discuss ex-amples of how this can be used to achieve superior performance in mechanics, photonics, electronics, sensors, and other areas.

    References:
    “Dynamic kirigami structures for integrated solar tracking.” Nature Comm. 6, 8092 (2015)
    “A kirigami approach to engineering elasticity in nanocomposites through patterned defects.” Na-ture Mater., 14 (2015) 785
    “An Electric Eel-Inspired Artificial Soft Power Source from Stacked Hydrogels.” Nature, 552 (2017) 214

    Lecture

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