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  • Date:07SundayMarch 202109TuesdayMarch 2021

    Biomolecular Phase Separartion: A Student Organzied Conference

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Chairperson
    Yair Harel
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:07SundayMarch 2021

    Department of Molecular Genetics department seminar

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    Time
    13:00 - 13:30
    Title
    “Ambiguity resolution in the TGFb/ BMP pathways through combinatorial SMAD complex formation”
    Location
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/92440011671?pwd=Yk9kQUpqWkJnUmFMRUlnT0NaSlliUT09
    Lecturer
    Johannes Auth
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Student and Post-Doc Seminar
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:08MondayMarch 2021

    Proteins mobility, affinity & stability for optimized function

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/98063488104?pwd=N3VqTC9sU1A4RHVDZ1dhOGVxbU1iUT09
    Lecturer
    Prof. Koby Levy
    Department of Structural Biology
    Organizer
    Faculty of Chemistry
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Proteins, which are at the heart of many biological processe...»
    Proteins, which are at the heart of many biological processes, are involved in a variety of self-assembly processes that are controlled by various chemical and physical interactions. Quantifying the driving forces that govern these processes and particularly the trade-offs between them is essential to obtaining a more complete understanding of protein dynamics and function. In my lecture, I will discuss the molecular determinants that govern linear diffusion of proteins along DNA or along microtubules. These and other cellular processes, such as protein folding, are subject to conflicting forces some of which are regulated by post-translational modifications. Understanding the trade-offs between the stability, affinity and mobility is not only essential to decipher transport processes in the cell but also for formulating concepts for their engineering. I will discuss the power of computational models in formulating fundamental biomolecular concepts and in predicting novel principles of cellular function or for its optimization.
    Colloquia
  • Date:08MondayMarch 2021

    Women's Day 2021

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    Time
    12:30 - 15:00
    Title
    Save the date
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:09TuesdayMarch 2021

    To be announced

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    Time
    10:00 - 10:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer
    Dr. Mattia Morandi
    Dept. of Biomolecular Sciences-WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Homepage
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:09TuesdayMarch 2021

    Diatom modulation of associated bacteria

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    Time
    11:30 - 12:30
    Title
    Guest Seminar via Zoom
    Location
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/91943922657?pwd=QnF1eThwV0lWTk45ZWFBWnlHeGx2Zz09Password620591
    Lecturer
    Dr. Ahmed Shibl
    Marine Microbial Ecology Lab - New York University Abu Dhabi
    Organizer
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Dr. Einat Segev...»
    Host: Dr. Einat Segev
    Lecture
  • Date:09TuesdayMarch 2021

    Dissecting the Alzheimer’s brain: from disease single cells to cellular communities

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    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Lecturer
    Prof. Naomi Habib
    Edmond & Lily Safra Center for Brain Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
    Organizer
    Department of Neurobiology
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Zoom link to join: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96608033618?p...»
    Zoom link to join:
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96608033618?pwd=SEdJUkR2ZzRBZ3laUUdGbWR1VFJTdz09

    Meeting ID: 966 0803 3618
    Password: 564068

    Host: Dr. Rita Schmidt rita.schmidt@weizmann.ac.il tel: 9070
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is one of the most pressing globa...»

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is one of the most pressing global medical issues to date with no effective therapeutic strategies. Despite extensive research much remains unknown regarding the crosstalk between brain cells and the role of non-neuronal cells in the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We use single nucleus RNA-sequencing and machine learning algorithms to build detailed cellular maps of mice and human brain and to follow molecular changes in each cell type along disease progression. Our maps revealed new disease associated states in glia cells as well as unique multi-cellular communities linked to AD. Specifically, we found a link between populations of disease-associated astrocytes (DAAs), microglia, oligodendrocytes and GABAergic neurons to AD related traits in mouse models and in post-mortem human brains. Expanding the data analysis across multiple cell types, we found co-occurrences of cellular populations across individuals, which we define as multi-cellular communities. Among these communities we discovered a unique cellular community linked to cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease pathology. These new insights are shaping our understanding of the unique cellular environment of the Alzheimer’s disease brains.


    Zoom link to join:
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96608033618?pwd=SEdJUkR2ZzRBZ3laUUdGbWR1VFJTdz09

    Meeting ID: 966 0803 3618
    Password: 564068

    Host: Dr. Rita Schmidt rita.schmidt@weizmann.ac.il tel: 9070
    Lecture
  • Date:10WednesdayMarch 2021

    Algebraic Geometry and Representation Theory Seminar

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    Time
    14:30 - 15:30
    Title
    Weyl group representations and Harish-Chandra cells
    Lecturer
    David Vogan
    MIT
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Algebraic Geometry and Representation Theory Seminar, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Algebraic Geometry and Representation Theory Seminar, Department of Mathematics
    Algebraic Geometry and Representation Theory Seminar
    Homepage
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    AbstractShow full text abstract about Suppose g is a semisimple Lie algebra with Weyl group W. Wri...»
    Suppose g is a semisimple Lie algebra with Weyl group W. Write L(w) for the irreducible highest weight module of highest weight -w.rho - rho. Write J (for "Joseph") for the set of primitive ideals in a semisimple enveloping algebra contained in the augmentation ideal. In a 1978 paper "W-module structure in the primitive spectrum..." Joseph attached to each primitive ideal I in J a subset

    Lcell(I) = {w in W | Ann(L(w)) = I}.

    He showed also how to make Lcell(I) into a basis for a representation
    sigma(I) of W, in such a way that

    sum_{I in J} sigma(I) = regular representation of W.

    These representations sigma(I) are now called "left cell
    representations," terminology that is apparently due to Joseph (see
    his 1981 paper "Goldie rank in the enveloping algebra...III," page
    310).

    Joseph proved in a 1980 paper that each left cell representation
    consists of exactly one copy of Joseph's "Goldie rank representation"
    for the primitive ideal I, and some additional representations that
    are not Goldie rank representations.

    For the past forty years, understanding of these left cell
    representations of W has been at the heart of a great deal of work on
    representations of reductive groups.

    Lusztig in his 1984 book gave a description of all left cells in terms of the geometry of nilpotent orbits.

    Part of Lusztig's description uses Springer's parametrization of W
    representations by irreducible representations of the equivariant
    fundamental group A(O) for a nilpotent orbit O. I will discuss the
    "opposite" part of Lusztig's description, involving conjugacy classes
    in A(O).
    Lecture
  • Date:14SundayMarch 2021

    Nucleation fronts initiate frictional motion

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Lecturer
    Prof. Jay Fineberg
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science
    Soft Matter and Biomaterials
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Zoom LInk: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/97917323609?pwd=OGpCV...»
    Zoom LInk: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/97917323609?pwd=OGpCVzNKWGlCSS9lbTIyS0FtN1lHUT09

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that rapid rupture fronts, akin to earthquakes, mediate the transition to frictional motion. Moreover, once these dynamic rupture fronts ("laboratory earthquakes" ) are created, their singular form, dynamics and arrest are well-described by fracture mechanics. Ruptures, however, need to be created within initially rough frictional interfaces, before they are able to propagate. This is the reason that ``static friction coefficients” are not well-defined; frictional ruptures can nucleate for a wide range of applied forces. A critical open question is, therefore, how the nucleation of rupture fronts actually takes place. We experimentally demonstrate that rupture front nucleation is prefaced by slow nucleation fronts. These nucleation fronts, which are self-similar, are not described by fracture mechanics. They emerge from initially rough frictional interfaces at a well-defined stress threshold, evolve at characteristic velocity and time scales governed by stress levels, and propagate within a frictional interface to form the initial rupture from which fracture mechanics take over. These results are of fundamental importance to questions ranging from earthquake nucleation and prediction to processes governing material failure.
    Lecture
  • Date:14SundayMarch 2021

    Department of Molecular Genetics departmental seminar

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    Time
    13:00 - 13:30
    Title
    “Quantitative analysis by 3D MAPs reveals new cell morphogenetic behaviors which drive bone growth”
    Location
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/97246877306?pwd=R1FSemROR3hseTNWRDhQeVNBSExWZz09
    Lecturer
    Sarah Rubin
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Student and Post-Doc Seminar
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:16TuesdayMarch 2021

    Cortical Layer 1 – The Memory Layer?

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    Time
    12:30
    Lecturer
    Dr. Guy Doron
    Humboldt University of Berlin Neurocure Cluster of Excellence, Berlin
    Organizer
    Department of Neurobiology
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Zoom link to join: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96608033618?p...»
    Zoom link to join:
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96608033618?pwd=SEdJUkR2ZzRBZ3laUUdGbWR1VFJTdz09

    Meeting ID: 966 0803 3618
    Password: 564068

    Host: Dr. Rita Schmidt rita.schmidt@weizmann.ac.il tel: 9070

    AbstractShow full text abstract about The hippocampus and related medial temporal lobe structures ...»
    The hippocampus and related medial temporal lobe structures (entorhinal cortex, perirhinal cortex, etc.) play a vital role in transforming experience into long-term memories that are then stored in the cortex, however the cellular mechanisms which designate single neurons to be part of a memory trace remain unknown. Part of the difficulty in addressing the mechanisms of transformation of short-term to long-term memories is the distributed nature of the resulting “engram” at synapses throughout the cortex. We therefore used a behavioral paradigm dependent on both the hippocampus and neocortex that enabled us to generate memory traces rapidly and reliably in a specific cortical location, by training rodents to associate the direct electrical microstimulation of the primary sensory neocortex with a reward. We found that medial-temporal input to neocortical Layer 1 (L1) gated the emergence of specific firing responses in subpopulations of Layer 5 pyramidal neurons marked by increased burstiness related to apical dendritic activity. Following learning and during memory retrieval, these neocortical responses became independent of the medial-temporal influence but continued to evoke behaviour with single bursts sufficient to elicit a correct response. These findings suggest that L1 is the locus for hippocampal-dependent associative learning in the neocortex, where memory engrams are established in subsets of pyramidal neurons by enhancing the sensitivity of tuft dendrites to contextual inputs and driving burst firing.

    Zoom link to join- https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96608033618?pwd=SEdJUkR2ZzRBZ3laUUdGbWR1VFJTdz09

    Meeting ID: 966 0803 3618
    Password: 564068
    Host: Dr. Rita Schmidt rita.schmidt@weizmann.ac.il tel: 9070
    Lecture
  • Date:16TuesdayMarch 2021

    Ecosystem ecology to inform global biodiversity restoration

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    Time
    13:00 - 14:00
    Title
    SAERI - Sustainability and Energy Research Initiative seminar series
    Location
    via zoom
    Lecturer
    Prof. Thomas Crowther
    Department of Environmental Systems Science, ETH Zurich, Switzerland
    Organizer
    Feinberg Graduate School
    Alternative Sustainable Energy Research Initiative (AERI)
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Prof. Ron Milo https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/939128959...»
    Host: Prof. Ron Milo

    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/93912895903?pwd=VFZtMHFCK244MTBrMUJoNmY1dEhCQT09
    Meeting ID: 939 1289 5903
    Password: 12345
    Lecture
  • Date:17WednesdayMarch 2021

    Algebraic Geometry and Representation Theory Seminar

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    Time
    16:30 - 17:30
    Title
    The orbit method, microlocal analysis and applications to L-functions
    Lecturer
    Paul Nelson
    ETH Zurich
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Algebraic Geometry and Representation Theory Seminar, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Algebraic Geometry and Representation Theory Seminar, Department of Mathematics
    Algebraic Geometry and Representation Theory Seminar
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about I will describe how the orbit method can be developed in a q...»
    I will describe how the orbit method can be developed in a quantitative form, along the lines of microlocal analysis, and applied to local problems in representation theory and global problems concerning automorphic forms. The local applications include asymptotic expansions of relative characters. The global applications include moment estimates and subconvex bounds for L-functions. These results are the subject of two papers, the first joint with Akshay Venkatesh:


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1805.07750

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2012.0218


    Lecture
  • Date:18ThursdayMarch 2021

    RNA Therapeutics: From Gene Silencing to Gene Editing

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Lecturer
    Dan Peer, PhD
    Director, Laboratory of Precision NanoMedicine Tel Aviv University
    Organizer
    Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Cancer Research Club
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2...»
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09
    Lecture
  • Date:21SundayMarch 2021

    Department of Molecular Genetics departmental seminar

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    Time
    13:00 - 13:30
    Title
    “Watching translocation as it occurs: A new approach to study protein targeting”
    Location
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96948336875?pwd=Q3Bva1hldHdWVk85a2JZeDIxMUZBdz09
    Lecturer
    Nir Cohen
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:22MondayMarch 2021

    Computational protein design: basic research and applications

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/98063488104?pwd=N3VqTC9sU1A4RHVDZ1dhOGVxbU1iUT09
    Lecturer
    Prof. Sarel Fleishman
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences, WIS
    Organizer
    Faculty of Chemistry
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Until very recently, the accuracy of protein-design calculat...»
    Until very recently, the accuracy of protein-design calculations was considered too low to enable the design of large proteins of complex fold. As a result, enzyme and binder optimization has relied on random or semi-rational mutagenesis and high-throughput screening. Our lab is developing a unique approach that combines structural bioinformatics analyses with atomistic design calculations to dramatically increase the accuracy of design calculations. Using this strategy, we have developed several general and completely automated methods for optimizing protein stability and activity. I will briefly discuss the fundamentals of this strategy and show case studies of large and complex proteins that we and our collaborators have optimized. Our lab’s long-term and still-unmet research goal is to enable the completely automated design of any biomolecular activity, and I will focus on our current research directions including the design of new enzymes and binders.
    Colloquia
  • Date:05MondayApril 2021

    Chemistry colloquium

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/98063488104?pwd=N3VqTC9sU1A4RHVDZ1dhOGVxbU1iUT09
    Lecturer
    Prof. Rafal Klajn
    Department of Organic Chemistry, WIS
    Organizer
    Faculty of Chemistry
    Contact
    Colloquia
  • Date:06TuesdayApril 2021

    To be announced

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    Time
    12:30
    Lecturer
    Guy Doron
    Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya
    Organizer
    Department of Neurobiology
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Zoom link to join-https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96608033618?pwd...»
    Zoom link to join-https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96608033618?pwd=SEdJUkR2ZzRBZ3laUUdGbWR1VFJTdz09

    Meeting ID: 966 0803 3618
    Password: 564068

    Host: Dr. Rita Schmidt rita.schmidt@weizmann.ac.il tel: 9070
    AbstractShow full text abstract about zoom link to join-https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96608033618?pwd...»
    zoom link to join-https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96608033618?pwd=SEdJUkR2ZzRBZ3laUUdGbWR1VFJTdz09

    Meeting ID: 966 0803 3618
    Password: 564068
    Host: Dr. Rita Schmidt rita.schmidt@weizmann.ac.il tel: 9070
    Lecture
  • Date:07WednesdayApril 2021

    Scientific Council meeting

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    Time
    14:00 - 16:00
    Contact
    Academic Events
  • Date:08ThursdayApril 2021

    Inactivation of DNA repair and high dose Vitamin C boost cancer immunotherapy

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Lecturer
    Prof. Alberto Bardelli
    University of Turin, Dept. of Oncology and Candiolo Cancer Institute, FPO-IRCCS
    Organizer
    Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Cancer Research Club
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2...»
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Lecture

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