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  • Date:22TuesdayOctober 2019

    Sensing and Recognition using Molecules and Nanomaterials: From toxic elements to Biomarkers

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    Time
    11:00 - 11:30
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Prof. Carlos Lodeiro
    FCT University NOVA of Lisbon – PORTUGAL
    Organizer
    Department of Organic Chemistry
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    AbstractShow full text abstract about We, humans and animals, feel the outside world thanks to our...»
    We, humans and animals, feel the outside world thanks to our 5 senses. We hear, we see, we smell, we touch, and we taste. The success of our lives often depends on how sharp our senses are. In a scientific environment, sensing and feeling is also important. In chemistry, in biology, in medicine, in forensics, as in other areas, feeling, recognising, is crucial. In the present seminar, I will show some examples of the use of chromophores such as porphyrins, emissive peptides, rhodamines, liquid crystals-based metal complexes, fluorescein and others, free or supported in polymers, paper, and gold, silver, platinum nanoparticles, or messoporous structured nanomaterials for hunting and capture of molecules, ions and biomarkers for Proteomics Applications.

    Lecture
  • Date:22TuesdayOctober 2019

    Towards Mass Spectrometry-Based Quantitative Clinical Proteomics

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    Time
    11:30 - 12:00
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Prof. Jose Luis Capelo Martinez
    FCT University NOVA of Lisbon – PORTUGAL
    Organizer
    Department of Organic Chemistry
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The use of proteomics in the clinical arena has been traditi...»
    The use of proteomics in the clinical arena has been traditionally hampered by low sample throughput and by difficulties in quantifying proteins in complex proteomes in an absolute manner. The use of ultrasonic energy to speed complex proteomics workflows for protein quantification along with thea advent of High Resolution Mass Spectrometry have made possible to treat and to analyze tens of samples a day, thus making mass spectrometry-based clinical proteomics a modern practical tool to be explored.
    Lecture
  • Date:22TuesdayOctober 2019

    On the surface but not superficial: Towards a deeper understanding of membrane remodeling

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Dr. Ori Avinoam
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Structural Biology
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    Lecture
  • Date:23WednesdayOctober 201924ThursdayOctober 2019

    Contemporary Crystal Engineering and Solid-State Chemistry: Symposium commemorating G. M. J. Schmidt's 100th birthday anniversary

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    Time
    08:00 - 18:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Chairperson
    Rafal Klajn and Omer Yaffe
    Organizer
    Conferences Section , Faculty of Chemistry
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  • Date:27SundayOctober 201931ThursdayOctober 2019

    PerICo - Training course and management meeting

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Chairperson
    Einat Zalckvar
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:27SundayOctober 2019

    Special Guest Seminar

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    Time
    12:00
    Title
    “Non-genetic adaptation to proteotoxic stress.”
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Peter Tsvetkov
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
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    Lecture
  • Date:28MondayOctober 201931ThursdayOctober 2019

    Advanced Practical Workshop in Drug Discovery

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    Nancy and Stephen Grand Israel National Center for Personalized Medicine
    Auditorium
    Chairperson
    Haim Michael Barr
    Organizer
    G-INCPM
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    Conference
  • Date:28MondayOctober 2019

    Molecular Electron Microscopy for Studies on Mechanism of Molecular Motions and Reactions

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:15
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Prof. Eiichi Nakamura
    University of Tokyo
    Organizer
    Faculty of Chemistry
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    Colloquia
  • Date:28MondayOctober 2019

    Life Science Colloquium- Prof. Daniel Douek

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Title
    Host genetic factors that affect HIV acquisition and vaccine efficacy
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Daniel Douek
    Organizer
    Life Sciences
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    Lecture
  • Date:29TuesdayOctober 2019

    Yosef Shaul 70th birthday - From Viruses to Proteostasis

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Chairperson
    Rivka Dikstein
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:29TuesdayOctober 2019

    To be announced

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    Time
    09:00 - 10:00
    Title
    Stem Cells, Regeneration and Aging Breakfast Seminar
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Seminar Room
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
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    Lecture
  • Date:29TuesdayOctober 2019

    "New Directions for Electricity and Fuels from Sunlight

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:30
    Title
    Prof.Israel Rubinstein Memorial Lecture
    Lecturer
    Prof. Harry Atwater
    Howard Hughes Professor and Professor of Applied Physics and Materials Science Director, Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis California Institute of Technology
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The recent rapid, global growth of photovoltaics has moved s...»
    The recent rapid, global growth of photovoltaics has moved scientific research frontiers for solar energy conversion towards new opportunities including i) ultrahigh efficiency photovoltaics (η > 30%) and ii) direct synthesis of energy-dense chemical fuels from sunlight, including hydrogen and products from reduction of carbon dioxide. I will illustrate several examples of how design of materials for light harvesting, charge transport and catalytic selectivity can enable advances in electricity and fuel synthesis. Photonic design has opened new directions for high efficiency photovoltaics and luminescent solar concentrators. Semiconductors coupled to water oxidation and reduction catalysts have enabled approaches to photoelectrochemical solar-to-hydrogen generation with >19% efficiency using artificial photosynthetic structures. Solar-driven reduction of carbon dioxide presents both an enormous opportunity and challenge because of the need for selectivity in generating useful multi-carbon products by multiple electron and multi-proton transfer steps. Present work and future directions in selective photocatalytic and photo-electrocatalytic materials for artificial photosynthesis aimed at catalytic reduction of carbon dioxide will be discussed.
    Lecture
  • Date:29TuesdayOctober 2019

    Mass spectrometry reveals the chemistry of formaldehyde cross-linking in structured proteins

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Dr. Nir Kalisman
    Dept. of Biological Chemistry The Hebrew University
    Organizer
    Department of Structural Biology
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    Lecture
  • Date:30WednesdayOctober 2019

    Seminar for thesis defense Naama Dekel

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    Time
    13:00 - 14:00
    Title
    System level study of the cell death functional signature in metastatic melanoma cell lines
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Naama Dekel
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Seminar
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    Lecture
  • Date:31ThursdayOctober 2019

    Mini-Symposium on Demystifying machine learning for microscopy

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Chairperson
    Ofra Golani
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:31ThursdayOctober 2019

    Characterization of Biomolecule and Structure Changes using Polarization Transfer from Hyperpolarized Water

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    Time
    09:30 - 10:30
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Jihyun Kim
    Department of Chemistry ,Texas A&M University
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    The Helen and Martin Kimmel Institute for Magnetic Resonance
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful ...»
    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful analytical tool for the characterization of protein structure and intermolecular interactions. However, NMR is not readily applicable to determine fast structural changes and weak interactions between molecules because of low signal sensitivity and time requirements to record multi-dimensional NMR spectra. To overcome these limits, the hyperpolarization technique of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP) is combined with NMR. Not all molecules can be directly hyperpolarized. Instead, polarization transfer from hyperpolarized small molecules to a target of interest can be utilized as a means of obtaining polarization, as well as for detecting intermolecular interactions between these molecules Here, hyperpolarized water-assisted NMR spectroscopy was developed to measure intermolecular interactions with water. Firstly, the use of DNP hyperpolarization was demonstrated for the accurate determination of intermolecular cross-relaxation rates between hyperpolarized water and fluorinated target molecules.[1]
    Because hyperpolarized water acts as a source spin with a large deviation of the population from the equilibrium, the 19F signal on the target molecules is enhanced through NOE, allowing obtain an entire NOE buildup curve in a single, rapid measurement. When the hyperpolarized water-assisted NMR experiment is applied to a protein, water hyperpolarization can be transferred to amide protons on the protein through proton exchange. Further, this polarization spreads within the protein through intramolecular NOE to nearby protons including aliphatic groups.[2] By utilizing this polarization transfer, this method extends to measure enhanced 2D NMR spectra of the protein under folded and refolding conditions.[3] With the ability to rapidly measure protein signals that were enhanced through transferred polarization from hyperpolarized water, NMR spectra can be acquired within the timescale of the protein folding. Compared to the folded protein experiment, signals attributed to exchange-relayed NOEs are not observable in the refolding experiment (Figure 1b). These differences are explained by the absence of long-range contacts with nearby exchangeable protons such as OH protons
    Lecture
  • Date:31ThursdayOctober 2019

    TBA

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Shimon Weiss
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:03SundayNovember 201907ThursdayNovember 2019

    SAAC meeting 2019

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    Time
    All day
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Contact
    International Board
  • Date:03SundayNovember 2019

    Annual Zuckerman Symposium

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    Time
    10:00 - 14:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Homepage
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:03SundayNovember 2019

    Ocean Worlds of the Outer Solar System: Life as we know it or life as we don’t?

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    Time
    11:00
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Alex Hayes
    Associate Professor, Director, Cornell Center for Astrophysics and Planetarty Science, Director of the Spacecraft Planetary Image Facility
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Recent discoveries have shown that habitable environments li...»
    Recent discoveries have shown that habitable environments likely exist in subsurface water oceans within the outer planet moons of Europa and Enceladus. On Titan, the largest moon of Saturn, lakes and seas of liquid hydrocarbon exist in addition to a vast subsurface water ocean. These places represent ideal locations for hydrothermal environments that could sustain life as we know it and, in Titan’s case, perhaps even life as we don’t. The next generation of uncrewed planetary spacecraft will be designed to search for the signs of life in one or more of these worlds. This lecture will begin with a brief review of the discoveries that have motivated a renewed importance for Ocean World exploration, before diving into Titan's lakes and seas to discuss recent findings related to its hydrocarbon-based hydrologic cycle and setting the stage for the newly selected Dragonfly quadcopter set to explore Titan in the mid 2030s.
    Lecture

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