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  • Date:13ThursdayJune 2024

    Annual Conference of the The Israeli Fermentation Society (2024)

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    The David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Chairperson
    Ghil Jona
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:13ThursdayJune 2024

    MSc defense seminar by Lior Peretz (Dr. Yonatan Stelzer Lab)

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    Time
    09:00
    Title
    Unraveling the Role of the Polycomb Repressive Complex in Gene Regulation During Early Mammalian Embryogenesis
    Location
    Ullman 102
    Lecturer
    Lior Peretz
    Dr. Yonatan Stelzer Lab
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Cell Biology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:13ThursdayJune 2024

    Special Guest Seminar

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    Time
    13:30 - 14:30
    Title
    Are black holes real – a mathematical perspective
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 155
    Lecturer
    Sergiu Klainerman
    Princeton
    Organizer
    Department of Mathematics
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Given that black holes are by definition not directly observ...»
    Given that black holes are by definition not directly observable, physicists had to devise indirect techniques to test their reality. These efforts were recognized by 6 Nobel prizes in 2017 and 2020. The last three laureates included R. Penrose, cited for his famous singularity  theorem, a real and strikingly beautiful mathematical proof. That recognition illustrates the role of mathematics in testing the reality of physical objects by proving or disproving specific mathematical  conjectures. In my talk I will address the issue of the stability of Kerr black holes, another precise conjecture that can be decided by pure mathematical techniques.
    Lecture
  • Date:13ThursdayJune 2024

    Elucidating convergence and divergence of neural mechanisms: from genes to behavior

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    Time
    14:30 - 14:30
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Asaf Gat-Student Seminar-PhD Thesis Defense
    Dr. Meital Oren Lab
    Organizer
    Department of Brain Sciences
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Student Seminar-PhD Thesis Defense For accessibility issu...»
    Student Seminar-PhD Thesis Defense

    For accessibility issues:naomi.moses@weizmann.ac.il
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The capacity of animals to respond to stimuli in their surro...»
    The capacity of animals to respond to stimuli in their surroundings is crucial for their survival. In mammals, complex evaluations of the environment require large numbers and different subtypes of neurons. The nematode C. elegans utilize its compact nervous system to process environmental cues and tune behavior. Integration of opposing spatial information and adaptation to distinct types of addictive substances are only a few challenges that require efficient and effective use of the worm’s compact nervous system. We describe how distinct environmental cues can converge onto common neural networks and molecular mechanisms but generate diverse neuronal and behavioral responses. Using a multidisciplinary approach, we completed several parallel aims, including the development of two novel research methods
    Lecture
  • Date:13ThursdayJune 2024

    Vision and AI

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    Time
    16:00 - 17:00
    Title
    Today’s “AI”-derived engineer-level models of the neural mechanisms of primate object perception, and tests of their application in non-invasive modulation of high level brain states
    Location

    Lecture Hall - Room 1
    Lecturer
    James DiCarlo
    MIT
    Organizer
    Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Seminar
    Homepage
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of ***Zoom Only***...»
    ***Zoom Only***
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The human species is on a great scientific quest — to unders...»
    The human species is on a great scientific quest — to understand the neural mechanisms of human (primate) intelligence.  Recent progress in multiple subfields of brain research suggests that key next steps in this quest will result from building real-world capable, systems-level network models that aim to abstract, emulate and explain the primate neural mechanisms underlying natural intelligent behavior.  In this talk, I will briefly outline the story of how neuroscience, cognitive science and computer science (“AI”) converged to create specific, image-computable, deep neural network models intended to appropriately abstract, emulate and explain the mechanisms of primate core visual object identification and categorization.  Based on a large body of primate neurophysiological and behavioral data, some of these network models are currently the leading (i.e. most accurate) scientific theories of the internal mechanisms of the primate ventral visual stream and how those mechanisms support the ability of humans and other primates to rapidly and accurately infer latent world content (e.g. object identity, position, pose, etc.) from the set of pixels (image) received under typical (brief) natural viewing.

    While still far from complete, because these leading neuroscientific models are fully observable and machine-executable, they offer predictive and potential application power that the field’s prior conceptual models did not.   I will describe two recent examples from our team.  First, I will show that — relative to the gold standard of primate brains and minds — the leading models are both similarly sensitive to and similarly robust to adversarial attack at both their neural levels and their behavioral levels.  Second, I will describe initial empirical tests of the closely related possibility of using such models to design spatial patterns of light energy on the retina (i.e. customized, synthetic images) to precisely, and non-invasively modulate neuronal activity deep in the primate brain.  Consistent with model predictions, these tests reveal surprisingly strong and precise neural population effects.  Besides being a tool for neuroscience, we see this as an exciting new application avenue of potential human clinical benefit.
    Lecture
  • Date:16SundayJune 202420ThursdayJune 2024

    Polymer Networks and Gels (PNG)

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Chairperson
    Nir Kampf
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:16SundayJune 2024

    On Microbes and Mountains: Unraveling the Links Between Microbial Weathering and Large-Scale Surface Processes

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    Time
    11:00
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Michal Ben-Israel
    University of California
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Microorganisms play a crucial role in the weathering process...»
    Microorganisms play a crucial role in the weathering processes that transform rock into soil through chemical and physical mechanisms essential for nutrient cycling, nitrogen fixation, carbon storage, and organic matter decomposition. This intricate relationship between microbial life and landscapes forms the backbone of ecosystem dynamics and biogeochemical processes. Microbes influence rock weathering and soil production, adapting to their surroundings and creating distinct communities across various landscapes. These complex interactions and feedback mechanisms are pivotal to understanding the co-evolution of microbial communities and landscapes over time. However, existing research on microbial contributions to weathering and soil production has predominantly focused on relatively short timescales and small spatial scales. Understanding the interplay between the evolution of microbial communities and their role in weathering processes over geomorphic timescales within transient landscapes is important for a more complete understanding of how landscapes evolve as well as the impact of geomorphic changes on microbial community establishment and evolution.
    The main objective of this study is to elucidate the long-term dynamics of microbial communities and their role in weathering processes over millennial timescales. To achieve this, we focused on recently deglaciated basins in the Eastern Sierra Nevada, CA, examining bacterial community composition in three phases of the weathering process: exposed rock at the surface, saprolite—the weathered rock found beneath soil, and soil. Sampling along an elevational transect, we collected 25 samples of rock, soil, and saprolite, and evaluated their bacterial composition using 16S rRNA and metagenomic sequencing.
    Results show that both soil and saprolite samples exhibited diverse and similar microbial communities, indicating a developmental relationship between these habitats despite distinct geochemical compositions. In contrast, rock habitats are less diverse, and their composition resembles those of young deglaciated landscapes. Our findings point to a link between microbial community composition and rock-to-soil weathering processes, suggesting that the majority of weathering processes occur within the soil column (saprolite and soil), with exposed rock maintaining a steady state.
    The stability of these microbial communities over extended timescales suggests a potentially significant role for microbial weathering in landscape evolution. This finding underscores the importance of considering microbial contributions in future geomorphic studies, as they may play a key role in shaping the Earth's surface. Moving forward, we plan on coupling a long-term, landscape-scale geomorphic perspective with 'omics approaches from microbial ecology to comprehensively understand the complex relationships between microbial life and landscapes, ultimately advancing our knowledge of ecosystem dynamics and health.
    Lecture
  • Date:16SundayJune 2024

    Plan A+ - How geoengineering using stratospheric aerosols could play a role in climate policy

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    Time
    13:00 - 14:00
    Location
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/98884644964?pwd=SUF0cnVEZndYWmw1azFPQlhrTStuQT09
    Lecturer
    Dr. Peter Irvine
    Assistant Professor, University College London, Earth Sciences
    Organizer
    Sustainability and Energy Research Initiative (SAERI)
    Alternative Sustainable Energy Research Initiative (AERI)
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/98884644964?pwd=SUF0cnVEZndYWmw1a...»
    https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/98884644964?pwd=SUF0cnVEZndYWmw1azFPQlhrTStuQT09
    Meeting ID: 988 8464 4964
    Password: 149775
    Lecture
  • Date:17MondayJune 2024

    title tbd

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:15
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Prof. Michael R. Wasielewski
    Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University
    Organizer
    Faculty of Chemistry
    Homepage
    Contact
    Colloquia
  • Date:17MondayJune 2024

    Foundations of Computer Science Seminar

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:15
    Title
    Coding Theory in Almost-Linear Time and Sub-Linear Space
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 155
    Lecturer
    Dana Moshkovitz
    UT Austin
    Organizer
    Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Seminar
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Typical time-efficient encoding and decoding algorithms for ...»
    Typical time-efficient encoding and decoding algorithms for error correcting codes use linear space. We construct asymptotically good codes that can be deterministically encoded in almost linear time and sub-linear space, as well as asymptotically good codes that can be deterministically decoded in this complexity. The encodable codes are based on condenser graphs. The decodable codes are based on locally correctable codes and a new efficient derandomization method. We believe that the new derandomization method is of independent interest.

    The talk is based on joint works with Joshua Cook (University of Texas at Austin).
    Lecture
  • Date:17MondayJune 2024

    Employing Phage Display Technology for Developing Potential Human Therapeutic Antibodies

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Ahuva Nissim
    WHRI, Queen Mary University of London
    Organizer
    Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:18TuesdayJune 2024

    To be announced

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    Time
    10:00 - 11:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Cafeteria
    Lecturer
    Prof. Yuval Ebenstein
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology. Faculty of Medicine. Tel-Aviv University
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:19WednesdayJune 2024

    Machine Learning and Statistics Seminar

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:15
    Title
    Making SGD as Parameter-Free as Possible
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 1
    Lecturer
    Yair Carmon
    TAU
    Organizer
    Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Seminar
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about While stochastic optimization methods drive continual improv...»
    While stochastic optimization methods drive continual improvements in machine learning, choosing the optimization parameters—particularly the learning rate (LR)—remains challenging. In this talk, I will describe our work on eliminating LR tuning from stochastic gradient descent (SGD) under convexity assumptions. Our starting point is a novel post-hoc empirical certificate for the SGD step size choice, which yields strong parameter-free guarantees via a bisection procedure. This certificate also inspires a tuning-free dynamic SGD step size formula, which we call Distance over Gradients (DoG). For smooth stochastic objectives, we combine DoG with UniXGrad (Kavis et al., 2019) to obtain the first accelerated parameter-free method. Finally, we develop a “price of adaptivity” framework that allows us to evaluate the inherent cost of not knowing problem parameters in advance. In several settings, our lower bounds nearly match existing upper bounds, establishing there is no parameter-free lunch. 

    Joint work with Maor Ivgi, Itai Kreisler, and Oliver Hinder.
    Lecture
  • Date:19WednesdayJune 2024

    LS Luncheon

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    Time
    12:00 - 14:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Yifat Merbl
    Department of Systems Immunology
    Organizer
    Life Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:20ThursdayJune 2024

    Spotlight on Science

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    Time
    13:00 - 14:00
    Title
    TBA
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Organizer
    Science for All Unit
    Staff Scientists Seminar
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:20ThursdayJune 2024

    Glioma cellular heterogeneity in time and space

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Itay Tirosh
    The Dr. Celia Zwillenberg-Fridman and Dr. Lutz Zwillenberg Career Development Chair Department of Molecular Cell Biology Faculty of Biology
    Organizer
    Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Cancer Research Club
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of For joining remotely please use Zoom: https://weizmann.zoom....»
    For joining remotely please use Zoom: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09
    Meeting ID: 506 540 2023
    Password: 223081
    Lecture
  • Date:25TuesdayJune 2024

    'Mechano-regulation of gene expression in striated muscle'.

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    Time
    10:00 - 11:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Daria Amiad-Pavlov
    Dept. of Molecular Genetics WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about In recent years the cell nucleus emerged as a dynamic mechan...»
    In recent years the cell nucleus emerged as a dynamic mechanosensor capable of sensing and transducing mechanical signals into cellular responses to facilitate homeostasis and adaptation to changing environmental conditions. The constantly beating heart has a remarkable ability to adapt its structure and contractility in response to changes in mechanical load. I am introducing unique, live, and dynamic imaging approaches to investigate how nuclei in the mature heart can provide such mechano-protection and mechano-regulation of the genome. I will present a novel assay to couple cytoskeletal to nuclear strain transfer in the beating cardiomyocyte, and its further application to decipher mechanisms of nuclear damage in dilated cardiomyopathy caused by mutations in the LMNA gene (LMNA-DCM). This work pinpoints localized microtubule-dependent forces, but surprisingly not actomyosin contractility, as drivers of nuclear damage in LMNA-DCM, highlighting new therapeutic avenues. I will further discuss the role of mechanical signaling in spatial organization of the genome within the nucleus, to regulate transcriptionally active and repressed hubs, and downstream gene expression.
    Lecture
  • Date:26WednesdayJune 2024

    Spotlight on Science

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    Time
    13:00 - 14:00
    Title
    TBA
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer
    Ehud Funio
    Dr.
    Organizer
    Science for All Unit
    Staff Scientists Seminar
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:27ThursdayJune 2024

    Immunological aspects of immune checkpoint blockade

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Yuval Shaked
    Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion
    Organizer
    Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Cancer Research Club
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6...»
    Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Lecture
  • Date:30SundayJune 2024

    Data synthesis to assess the effects of climate change on agricultural production and food security

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    Time
    11:00
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    David Makowski
    INRAe & University Paris-Saclay
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Climate change is having an impact on agricultural productio...»
    Climate change is having an impact on agricultural production and food
    security. Rising temperatures, changes in rainfall patterns and extreme
    weather events can reduce crop yields, sometimes dramatically. However,
    climate change can also offer new opportunities, by generating more
    favorable climatic conditions for agricultural production in certain regions
    that were previously less productive. In order to assess the positive and
    negative impacts of climate change on agriculture and identify effective
    adaptation strategies, scientists have produced massive amounts of data
    during the last two decades, conducting local experiments in agricultural
    plots and using models to simulate the effect of climate on crop yields. In
    most cases, these data are not pooled together and are analyzed separately
    by different groups of scientists to assess the effects of climate change at a
    local level, without any attempt to upscale the results at a larger scale. Yet, if
    brought together, these data represent a rich source of information that are
    relevant to analyze the effect of climate across diverse environmental
    conditions. The wealth of data available has led to the emergence of a new
    type of scientific activity, involving the retrieval of all available data on a
    given subject and their synthesis into more robust and generic results. In this
    talk, I review the statistical methods available to synthesize data generated
    in studies quantifying the effect of climate change on agriculture. I discuss
    both the most classic methods - such as meta-analysis - and more recent
    methods based on machine learning. In particular, I show how this approach
    can be used to map the impact of climate change on a large scale (national,
    continental and global) from local data. I illustrate these methods in several
    case studies and present several research perspectives in this area.
    Lecture

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