Pages

Event search results

  • Date:28TuesdayJanuary 2020

    Department of Molecular Genetics Special guest seminar

    More information
    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Title
    “Microtubule dynamics at synaptic contacts are modulated by neuronal activity and affected by oligomeric AB1-42"
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Francesca Bartolini
    Assistant professor Pathology and Cell Biology department, Columbia University Medical Center, NY, USA.
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Guest Lecture
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of MTs, play key roles in neuronal function. In addition, synap...»
    MTs, play key roles in neuronal function. In addition, synaptic biphasic fluctuations of MT instability/stability and tubulin post-translational modifications (PTMs) are associated with memory formation and are disrupted in aging, indicating a primary role for the regulation of MT dynamics and tubulin PTMs in the maintenance of synaptic plasticity. In support of this model, we recently found that stabilization of dynamic MTs and induction of tubulin PTMs by the formin mDia1 contribute to oligomeric Aβ1-42 synaptotoxicity, and inhibition of MT dynamics alone is sufficient to promote tau hyperphosphorylation and tau dependent synaptotoxicity (Qu et al., J Cell Biol, 2017). To test whether these changes occur at synapses and are directly responsible for synapse loss, we have further developed microscopy assays that measure MT invasions into dendritic spines and MT contacts with single presynaptic boutons of hippocampal neurons in culture. Surprisingly, we found that dynamic MT plus ends preferentially grow near presynaptic boutons (Qu et al., Curr Biol, 2019), and rescue/nucleation at boutons is enhanced by neurotransmitter release or when neurons are challenged with oligomeric Aβ1-42, an activity mediated by tau. Our data underscore the existence of a previously uncharacterized formin-mediated pathway of synaptotoxicity and a subset of tau-dependent presynaptic dynamic MTs that respond to neurotransmission and excitotoxicity.
    Lecture
  • Date:28TuesdayJanuary 2020

    New methods for identifying latent manifold structure from neural data

    More information
    Time
    14:00
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Prof. Jonathan Pillow
    Dept of Psychology, Princeton University
    Organizer
    Department of Neurobiology
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Prof. Jonathan Pillow is visiting as a Guest of "Studen...»
    Prof. Jonathan Pillow is visiting as a Guest of "Students-Invited Lecture Series in Brain Sciences" and will give 2 seminars.
    For more details please contact: Aharon Ravia tel: 6273 aharon.ravia@weizmann.ac.il

    For accessibility issues, please contact naomi.moses@weizmann.ac.il
    AbstractShow full text abstract about An important problem in neuroscience is to identify low-dime...»
    An important problem in neuroscience is to identify low-dimensional structure underlying noisy, high-dimensional spike trains. In this talk, I will discuss recent advances for tackling this problem in single and multi-region neural datasets. First, I will discuss the Gaussian Process Latent Variable Model with Poisson observations (Poisson-GPLVM), which seeks to identify a low-dimensional nonlinear manifold from spike train data. This model can successfully handle datasets that appear high-dimensional with linear dimensionality reduction methods like PCA, and we show that it can identify a 2D spatial map underlying hippocampal place cell responses from their spike trains alone. Second, I will discuss recent extensions to Poisson-spiking Gaussian Process Factor Analysis (Poisson-GPFA), which incorporates separate signal and noise dimensions as well as a multi-region model with coupling between latent variables governing activity in different regions. This model provides a powerful tool for characterizing the flow of signals between brain areas, and we illustrate its applicability using multi-region recordings from mouse visual cortex.

    Lecture
  • Date:29WednesdayJanuary 2020

    Developmental Club Series 2019-20

    More information
    Time
    10:00
    Title
    “Glia-neuron interactions facilitate axon pruning”
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Oren Schuldiner
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Developmental Club
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:30ThursdayJanuary 2020

    New MRI methods to evaluate structure and function of the left atrium

    More information
    Time
    09:30 - 10:30
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Prof. Dana C. Peters
    School of Medicine, Yale University
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    The Helen and Martin Kimmel Institute for Magnetic Resonance
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The left atrium is important as the site of many arrhythmias...»
    The left atrium is important as the site of many arrhythmias, is essential to the ventricle as a booster pump, and provides an early indicator of for many cardiovascular diseases.
    We have developed MR imaging methods for measuring remodeling of the left atrium including measurement and quantification of left atrial fibrosis, evaluation of function, volumes, strain, and diastolic indices of elevated filling pressure, which affect the atrium.
    Lecture
  • Date:30ThursdayJanuary 2020

    New MRI methods to evaluate structure and function of the left atrium

    More information
    Time
    09:30 - 10:30
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Prof. Dana Peters
    Yale School of Medicine
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    The Helen and Martin Kimmel Institute for Magnetic Resonance
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:30ThursdayJanuary 2020

    PhD Thesis Defense - Spatial and temporal integration in perceptual calibration

    More information
    Time
    10:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Brain Research
    Lecturer
    Ron Dekel (PhD Thesis Defense)
    Prof. Dov Sagi Lab Dept of Neurobiology
    Organizer
    Department of Neurobiology
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Students & Postdocs Seminar Benoziyo Brain Research Bui...»
    Students & Postdocs Seminar
    Benoziyo Brain Research Building Room 113


    For assistance with accessibility issues, please contact naomi.moses@weizmann.ac.il
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Processing of a visual stimulus depends on previous and surr...»
    Processing of a visual stimulus depends on previous and surrounding stimulations. For example, how an orientation detail is perceived depends on previous and surrounding orientation content. The influence of such context, temporal and spatial, is postulated to be beneficial, but the involved mechanism(s) as well as the behavioral relevance are not fully understood. Here, using behavioral experiments that measure how context integrates in space and time, we argue that context changes how statistical decisions are made by the visual system. Most importantly, we find that several context-dependent perceptual biases, such as visual illusions and aftereffects, are much reduced with increasing reaction time. To account for this, we consider a simple yet general explanation: prior and noisy decision-related evidence are integrated serially, with evidence and noise accumulating over time (as in the standard drift diffusion model). With time, owing to noise accumulation, the prior effect is predicted to diminish. This theory suggests a single-process alternative to the intuitive notion of dual brain systems (the so-called System 1 and System 2), and quantitatively predicts several known properties of perceptual bias, such as the order-of-magnitude variation in measured bias magnitudes between individuals.
    Lecture
  • Date:30ThursdayJanuary 2020

    Scale Invariance at low accelerations as an alternative to the dark Universe

    More information
    Time
    11:15 - 12:45
    Location
    Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Mordehai Milgrom
    Weizmann Institute of Science
    Organizer
    Faculty of Physics
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of 11:00 Coffee, tea and more...»
    11:00 Coffee, tea and more
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Galactic systems and the Universe at large exhibit significa...»
    Galactic systems and the Universe at large exhibit significant anomalies when analyzed within Newtonian dynamics and general relativity: Large discrepancies are found between the gravitational masses required by the observed dynamics, and the masses we actually observe in these systems. The mainstream explanation of these anomalies invokes the dominant and ubiquitous presence of “dark matter”. The "MOND" paradigm suggests, instead, that the discrepancies are due to breakdown of standard dynamics in the limit of low accelerations, where MOND dynamics are space-time scale invariant. MOND accounts for many detailed manifestations of the mass discrepancies with no need for dark matter. I will outline the paradigm, some of its achievements, and some remaining problems and desiderata.
    Colloquia
  • Date:30ThursdayJanuary 2020

    Rewiring cellular metabolism: novel insights into the role of estrogen receptor activating mutations in breast cancer

    More information
    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Ido Wolf
    Head; Oncology Division Tel Aviv Medical Center
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:02SundayFebruary 202005WednesdayFebruary 2020

    Next Gen Immunology 2020

    More information
    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    Michael and Anna Wix Auditorium
    Chairperson
    Eran Elinav
    Organizer
    The M.D. Moross Institute for Cancer Research , Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology , The Nancy and Stephen Grand Center for Sensors and Security
    Homepage
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:02SundayFebruary 2020

    Developing Models to Estimate Crop Water Consumption based on Remote Sensing and Meteorological Data

    More information
    Time
    11:00
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Offer Rozenstein
    Volcani
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:02SundayFebruary 2020

    Departmental Seminar - Molecular Genetics Dept.

    More information
    Time
    13:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:03MondayFebruary 2020

    Peptide-Coated Platinum Nanoparticles as Antitumor Agents

    More information
    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Dr. Michal Shoshan
    Group leader in Bioinorganic Chemistry Department of Chemistry, University of Zurich
    Organizer
    Department of Structural Biology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:04TuesdayFebruary 2020

    To be announced

    More information
    Time
    10:00 - 10:15
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Cafeteria
    Lecturer
    Yarden Tzur
    Dept. of Biomolecular Sciences-WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:04TuesdayFebruary 2020

    To be announced

    More information
    Time
    10:30 - 10:45
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Cafeteria
    Lecturer
    Daniel Hayat
    Dept. of Biomolecular Sciences-WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:04TuesdayFebruary 2020

    To be announced

    More information
    Time
    10:45 - 11:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Cafeteria
    Lecturer
    Anna Rivkin
    Dept. of Biomolecular Sciences-WIS
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:04TuesdayFebruary 2020

    TBA

    More information
    Time
    11:30 - 12:30
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Yair Mau
    The Department of Soil and Water Sciences, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
    Organizer
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Hosts: Dr. Cathy Bessudo and Dr. Hadas Zehavi ...»
    Hosts: Dr. Cathy Bessudo and Dr. Hadas Zehavi
    Lecture
  • Date:05WednesdayFebruary 2020

    Developmental Club Series 2019-20

    More information
    Time
    10:00
    Title
    Sex and the circuitry: The synaptic basis of sexually-dimorphic neuronal circuits
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Meital Oren
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Developmental Club
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:05WednesdayFebruary 2020

    Special Guest Seminar

    More information
    Time
    11:30 - 12:30
    Title
    “Mining the marine microbiome for remediation targets: lessons from the human microbiome”
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. David Zeevi
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics , Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:06ThursdayFebruary 2020

    Stem Cells, Regeneration and Aging Breakfast Seminar

    More information
    Time
    09:00 - 10:00
    Title
    Stem Cells, Regeneration and Aging Breakfast Seminar
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:06ThursdayFebruary 2020

    PRMT1 inhibition induces differentiation of colon cancer cells

    More information
    Time
    09:00 - 10:00
    Title
    LSCF departmental seminar
    Location
    Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Alexander Plotnikov
    Maurice and Vivienne Wohl Institute for Drug Discovery, G-INCPM
    Organizer
    Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities
    Contact
    Lecture

Pages