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  • Date:24SundayNovember 2019

    Mini-symposium on RNA biology in health and disease

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    Time
    09:00 - 10:45
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Ramesh Pillai, Dr. Alena Shkumatava, Prof. Donal O'Carrol
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:24SundayNovember 2019

    Isotopic diagenesis of biogenic silica in marine sediments and implications for Cenozoic climate

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    Time
    11:00
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Anastasia Yanchilina
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences Weizmann Institute of Science
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The oxygen isotopic signature of marine deep-sea cherts was ...»
    The oxygen isotopic signature of marine deep-sea cherts was previously used to reconstruct past ocean temperature and bottom water δ18O through the Cenozoic and Mesozoic periods. Oxygen isotopes of deep-sea cherts, which were never exposed to meteoric water, exhibit a wide range of values indicating that the evolution and maturation of biogenic amorphous opal (opal-A) to opal-CT and microquartz chert is accompanied by isotopic changes. We measured δ18O of diatom opal-A, opal-CT, and microquartz chert from deep sea cores retrieved from the Japan Sea. The δ18O of opal-CT and microquartz chert phases correspond to the depth in the sediments where these transitions occur, ~400 m and 40 °C for opal-A to opal-CT and ~500 m and 60 °C for opal-CT to microquartz chert. The δ18O values of opal-CT and microquartz chert appear to reflect equilibrium formation temperatures of silica, corresponding to the geothermal gradient and the local porewater δ18O. The δ18O of opal-CT and microquartz chert are controlled by the geothermal gradient and compositions of pore waters during polymorphic transformations deep within the sediment, indicating that the δ18O of these phases cannot be used to determine temperature or composition of seawater during diatom growth.
    Opal-A is the most susceptible phase for isotope alteration. We separated opal-A (i.e., diatoms, radiolaria, and siliceous sponge spicules) of Cenozoic age and measured its isotope composition. The results do not indicate any significant change in δ18O. This will be discussed within the general framework of global climatic change.
    Lecture
  • Date:24SundayNovember 2019

    Faculty Seminar

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    Time
    11:15 - 13:00
    Title
    On Benjamini-Schramm convergence
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 155
    Lecturer
    Arie Levit
    Yale University
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Seminar, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Seminar, Department of Mathematics
    Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Benjamini-Schramm convergence is a probabilistic notion usef...»
    Benjamini-Schramm convergence is a probabilistic notion useful in studying the asymptotic behavior of sequences of metric spaces. The goal of this talk is to discuss this notion and some of its applications from various perspectives, e.g. for groups, graphs, hyperbolic manifolds and locally symmetric spaces, emphasizing the distinction between the hyperbolic rank-one case and the rigid high-rank case. Understanding the "sofic" part of the Benjamini-Schramm space, i.e. all limit points of "finitary" objects, will play an important role. From the group-theoretic perspective, I will talk about sofic groups, i.e. groups which admit a probabilistic finitary approximation, as well as a companion notion of permutation stability. Several results and open problems will also be discussed.
    Lecture
  • Date:24SundayNovember 2019

    The Green Revolution and the 20th Century Decline in Infant Mortality: Evidence from 600,000 births

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    Time
    13:00 - 14:00
    Title
    SAERI - Sustainability and Energy Research Initiative
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Room 690
    Lecturer
    Prof. Ram Fishman
    Dept. Of Public Policy, Tel Aviv University
    Organizer
    Feinberg Graduate School
    Alternative Sustainable Energy Research Initiative (AERI)
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Prof. Ron Milo Light refreshments will be served at 1...»
    Host: Prof. Ron Milo
    Light refreshments will be served at 12:40
    Lecture
  • Date:25MondayNovember 2019

    1st ISR-Openscreen Workshop: Bringing Together Small Molecules and Biology

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Chairperson
    Haim Michael Barr
    Organizer
    G-INCPM , The Dr. Barry Sherman Institute for Medical Chemistry
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    Conference
  • Date:25MondayNovember 2019

    Seminar in Geometry and Topology

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    Time
    09:00 - 11:00
    Title
    Zariski cancellation problem for surfaces
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 155
    Lecturer
    Mikhail Zaidenberg
    .
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Seminar, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Seminar, Department of Mathematics
    Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of The Zariski Cancellation Problem asks when a stable isomorph...»
    The Zariski Cancellation Problem asks when a stable isomorphism of affine varieties over an algebraically closed field implies an isomorphism. This is true for affine curves (Abhyankar, Eakin, and Heinzer 72), for the affine plane in zero characteristic (Miyanishi-Sugie and Fujita 79 −80), but false for general affine surfaces in zero characteristic (Danielewski 88) and for the affine space A^3 in positive characteristic (N. Gupta 13). The talk is devoted to a recent progress in the surface case over a field of zero characteristic (Bandman-Makar-Limanov, Dubouloz, Flenner and Kaliman, e.a.). It occurs to be possible to describe the moduli space of pairs of surfaces with isomorphic cylinders.
    Lecture
  • Date:25MondayNovember 2019

    Engage and Evade, or Perish – A Viral Quest for a Host Cell while Eluding Immune Responses

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:15
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Dr. Ron Diskin
    Dept. of Structural Biology, WIS
    Organizer
    Faculty of Chemistry
    Contact
    Colloquia
  • Date:25MondayNovember 2019

    IMM Student seminar- Amalie Grenov (Dr. Ziv Shulman lab) and Leviel Fluhr (Prof. Eran Elinav's lab)

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    Time
    13:00 - 14:00
    Location
    Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Auditorium
    Organizer
    Department of Immunology
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    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayNovember 2019

    Genetic Metabolic Disorders Get-Together

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    Time
    08:00 - 17:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Chairperson
    Einat Zalckvar
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:26TuesdayNovember 2019

    Internal Waves in the Ocean - what we know, and what we don't

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Yuri V Lvov
    Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayNovember 2019

    Controlling fluorescence in photochromic systems: From on–off switching to full-color reproduction

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Prof. Joakim Andréasson
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Chalmers University of Technology
    Organizer
    Department of Organic Chemistry
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Energy transfer through the Förster mechanism, often referre...»
    Energy transfer through the Förster mechanism, often referred to as FRET, depends critically on the overlap between the emission of the donor chromophore and the absorption of the acceptor chromophore. When photochromic molecules (molecular photoswitches) are isomerized between the two forms, the absorption spectra typically experience dramatic changes. Also, some photoswitches display emission exclusively in one isomeric form. This opens up the possibility to switch the capacity to act as both donor- and acceptor units, and hence, also to control energy transfer processes with concomitant changes in the fluorescence pattern.
    In addition to the abovementioned spectral features, the rate of the FRET process is highly dependent on the distance between the donor and the acceptor. This parameter can also be varied using molecular photoswitches, in the making/breaking of supramolecular complexes, which in turn dramatically changes the donor-acceptor distance and the FRET efficiencies.
    In this presentation, I will give examples of how the both these approaches can be used to tune the emissive properties of photochromic constructs. From trivial fluorescence “on-off” switching, via directional switching, to systems displaying full-color reproduction.
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayNovember 2019

    The Neurobiology of Personality: Using AI to link Genes, Behavior, and Positive-Psychology

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    Time
    12:30
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Dr. Oren Forkosh
    Dept of Animal Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture, Rehovot The Hebrew University
    Organizer
    Department of Neurobiology
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Dr. Meital Oren meital.oren@weizmann.ac.il tel: 647...»
    Host: Dr. Meital Oren meital.oren@weizmann.ac.il tel: 6479

    For assistance with accessibility issues, please contact naomi.moses@weizmann.ac.il
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Individual differences are an essential property of all livi...»
    Individual differences are an essential property of all living things, and personality provides a unique glimpse into the biology underlying behavioral variability. And yet, because of the lack of a systematic approach to personality, most works on animal personalities still end up examining a limited subset of subjectively chosen behavioral readouts. Lately, we have shown how personality can be inferred directly and objectively from high-dimensional natural behavioral space. While this approach is not species-specific, we have demonstrated it on mice as it is one of the most common model animals. The mice were videoed over several days, and their behavior automatically analyzed in depth. Altogether, the computer identified 60 separate behaviors such as approaching others, chasing or fleeing, sharing food or keeping others away from food, exploring, or hiding. We found the mice personalities by working backward from behavior and extracting the underlying traits that differ among individuals while being stable over time and across contexts. We validated that traits found this way (which we term identity domains) were stable across social context, do not change with age, explain the variability in performance in classical tests, and significantly correlates with gene expression in brain regions related to personality. Expanding this method to human behavior, by using location and physiological data from cellphones and smartwatches, revealed a highly structured personality space which resembles that of the mice. This method allows for better informed mechanistic investigations into the biology of individual differences, systematically comparing behaviors across species, as well as develop more personalized psychiatry. Recently we have also been employing this approach to subjectively quantify wellness and welfare in both people and animals, towards the biology of happiness.
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayNovember 2019

    Structural design principles for specific RGS-G protein interactions

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Prof. Mickey Kosslof
    Haifa University
    Organizer
    Department of Structural Biology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:27WednesdayNovember 2019

    A Photodynamical Model for Uniform and Precise Planetary Parameters Determination in Kepler Systems

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    Time
    13:30 - 14:30
    Location
    Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    M. Magaritz Seminar Room
    Lecturer
    Gidi Yoffe
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences Weizmann Institute of Science
    Organizer
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:28ThursdayNovember 2019

    Preclinical Imaging using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance

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    Time
    09:30 - 10:30
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Prof. Boris Epel
    Department of Radiation & Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    The Helen and Martin Kimmel Institute for Magnetic Resonance
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Imaging is a well-esta...»
    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Imaging is a well-established method for the study of spatial distribution and local environment of electron paramagnetic centers and spin probes. One of the most important applications of modern EPR imaging is in vivo oximetry in which soluble spin probes with oxygen-dependent relaxation rates are used.
    Partial oxygen pressure (pO2) levels in tumors are major determinants of the response to cancer therapy. I will present the results of the in vivo oxygen guided radiation targeting study. This study combines pO2 images and conformal radiation delivery using 3D-printed blocks to achieve high precision treatment of tumor hypoxic areas. The study demonstrates that the dose to well-oxygenated tumor volumes in fibrosarcoma tumors in mice can be considerably reduced without compromising the outcome.
    Lecture
  • Date:28ThursdayNovember 2019

    A tale of two tales: a. Deconvolving cell-specific expression from bulk tumor data portrays the response to checkpoint therapy b. Uncovering the mutation selection associated with CRISPR editing

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Eytan Ruppin
    Chief, Cancer Data Science Lab, NCI, NIH
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Cell Biology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:28ThursdayNovember 2019

    TBA

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:30
    Location
    Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Boaz Katz
    WIS
    Organizer
    Faculty of Physics
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of 11:00 Coffee, Tae and more...»
    11:00 Coffee, Tae and more
    AbstractShow full text abstract about TBA ...»
    TBA
    Colloquia
  • Date:28ThursdayNovember 2019

    Geometric Functional Analysis and Probability Seminar

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    Time
    13:30 - 15:30
    Title
    Dynamics for spherical spin glasses: Disorder dependent initial conditions
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 155
    Lecturer
    Amir Dembo
    Stanford
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Seminar, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Seminar, Department of Mathematics
    Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of In this talk, based on a joint work with Eliran Subag, I wil...»
    In this talk, based on a joint work with Eliran Subag, I will explain how to rigorously derive the integro-differential equations that arise in the thermodynamic limit of the empirical correlation and response functions for Langevin dynamics in mixed spherical p-spin disordered mean-field models.

    I will then compare the large time asymptotic of these equations in case of a uniform (infinite-temperature) starting point, to what one obtains when starting within one of the spherical bands on which the Gibbs measure
    Lecture
  • Date:01SundayDecember 2019

    Departmental Seminar - Molecular Genetics Dept.

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    Time
    13:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:01SundayDecember 2019

    Active Matter: `active thermodynamics’ and the dynamics of biopolymer gels

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    Time
    13:15
    Location
    Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Drory Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Tomer Markovich
    CTBP, Rice University and DAMTP, University of Cambridge
    Organizer
    Department of Physics of Complex Systems
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Active materials are composed of many components that can co...»
    Active materials are composed of many components that can convert energy from its environment (usually in the form of chemical energy) into directed mechanical motion. Time reversal symmetry is thus locally broken, leading to a variety of novel phenomena such as motility induced phase separation, reversal of the Ostwald process and flocking. Examples of active matter are abundant and range from living matter such as bacteria, actomyosin networks and bird flocks to Janus particles, colloidal rollers and macroscale driven chiral rods. Nevertheless, in many cases experiments on active materials exhibit equilibrium like properties (e.g., sedimentation of bacteria). In the first part of the talk I will try to answer the important question: how do we know a system is `active’? And if it is, can we have generic observables as in equilibrium thermodynamics? Can we measure how far it is from equilibrium? In the second part of the talk I will focus on examples of activity in biopolymer gels, such as the cytoskeleton of living cells. I will show some of the effects of active motors with emphasis on chiral motors. The latter does not have a unique hydrodynamic description, which one can utilize to gain access to the microscopic details of the complex motors using macroscopic measurements. I will also discuss non-motor activity and demonstrate how it can result in contractility, e.g., in the process of cell division.
    Lecture

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