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  • Date:24SundayDecember 2017

    Looking for the right approach of renewable energy utilization

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    Time
    13:00
    Title
    SAERI: Sustainability And Energy Research Initiative
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Prof. Jacob Karni,
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, The Weizmann Institute of Science
    Organizer
    Feinberg Graduate School
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Light refreshments will be served at 12:40...»
    Light refreshments will be served at 12:40
    Lecture
  • Date:24SundayDecember 2017

    Departmental Seminar

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    Time
    13:00 - 14:00
    Title
    Discovering a cancer-associated mutation in autophagy and deciphering its functional implication
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Gal Nuta
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:25MondayDecember 2017

    "Organic Semiconductors: from Small Molecules to 2D Polymers"

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:15
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Prof. Dmitrii Perepichka
    McGill University
    Organizer
    Faculty of Chemistry
    Contact
    Colloquia
  • Date:25MondayDecember 2017

    Cell-free circulating tumour DNA as a non-invasive tool for cancer diagnostics and research

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Title
    Cancer Research Club
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Nitzan Rosenfeld
    Cancer Research UK, Cambridge Institute University of Cambridge, UK
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Cancer is driven by genomic alterations, and can evolve in r...»
    Cancer is driven by genomic alterations, and can evolve in response to selective pressures. Sampling of tumour material however is a limiting factor for both diagnostics and research. Blood plasma contains cell-free fragments of circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) that can be collected non-invasively. With advanced genomic techniques this becomes an effective source of information. “Liquid biopsy” assays are now entering clinical use for non-invasive molecular profiling of advanced cancers to guide targeted therapy. Serially-collection plasma samples can be used to track response to treatment, cancer progression and emergence of known or new resistance mechanisms. Methods that can detect minute amounts of ctDNA are being used to study early-stage cancer and for detection of minimal residual disease after initial definitive treatment.
    Lecture
  • Date:25MondayDecember 2017

    The QTY Code: A simple tool for membrane protein engineering. Subtitle: (Can you convert a hydrophobic alpha helix into a hydrophilic one?)

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Shuguang Zhang
    Center for Biomedical Engineering, MIT
    Organizer
    Department of Structural Biology
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Special Joint Seminar of Structural Proteomics Unit and Dept...»
    Special Joint Seminar of Structural Proteomics Unit and Dept Structural Biology
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Structure and function studies of membrane proteins, particu...»
    Structure and function studies of membrane proteins, particularly G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and multiple segment transmembrane proteins, require detergents. Without detergents these integral membrane proteins aggregate and are nearly impossible to analyze. We have devised a useful tool, the QTY Code, for engineering hydrophobic domains to become detergent-free, namely water-soluble, without significantly altering protein structure and function. Here we report using the QTY Code (glutamine, threonine and tyrosine) to systematically replace the hydrophobic amino acids leucine, valine, isoleucine and phenylalanine in the four chemokine receptors CCR5, CXCR4, CCR10 and CXCR7. Our simple QTY Code is a useful tool and has implications for engineering water-soluble variants of previously water-insoluble and perhaps aggregated proteins including amyloids.
    Lecture
  • Date:25MondayDecember 2017

    Foundations of Computer Science Seminar

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    Time
    14:30 - 16:00
    Title
    Prediction from Partial Information and Hindsight, with Application to Circuit Lower Bounds
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 1
    Lecturer
    Or Meir
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Consider a random sequence of n bits that has entropy at lea...»
    Consider a random sequence of n bits that has entropy at least n-k, where k << n. A commonly used observation is that an average coordinate of this random sequence is close to being uniformly distributed, that is, the coordinate "looks random''. In this work, we prove a stronger result that says, roughly, that the average coordinate looks random to an adversary that is allowed to query about n/k other coordinates of the sequence, even if the adversary is non-deterministic.
    As an application of this result, we prove a new result on depth-3 circuits, which recovers as a direct corollary the known lower bounds for the parity and majority functions, as well as a lower bound on sensitive functions due to Boppana.
    Lecture
  • Date:25MondayDecember 2017

    Foundations of Computer Science Seminar

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    Time
    14:30 - 16:00
    Title
    Prediction from Partial Information and Hindsight, with Application to Circuit Lower Bounds
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 290C
    Lecturer
    Or Meir
    Haifa University
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayDecember 2017

    Revealing the structural basis for membrane transport and GPCR signaling through atomic-level simulation

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    Time
    10:00 - 11:00
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Ron Dror
    Departments of Computer Science, Structural Biology, and Molecular and Cellular Physiology Stanford University
    Organizer
    The Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of We have used molecular dynamics simulations, together with c...»
    We have used molecular dynamics simulations, together with complementary experimental approaches, to address longstanding questions about the function of two large and critical classes of membrane proteins. First, transporters shuttle molecules across cell membranes by alternating among distinct conformational states. Despite decades of study, fundamental questions remain about how transporters transition between states and how such structural rearrangements regulate substrate translocation. We have captured the translocation process by unguided molecular dynamics simulations, providing an atomic-level description of alternating access transport [1]. Second, roughly one-third of all drugs act by binding to G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and either triggering or preventing receptor activation. The process by which they do so has proven difficult to determine, however, despite dramatic recent advances in GPCR crystallography. We have used simulations to reveal the processes by which drugs bind to GPCRs, by which GPCRs transition between active and inactive states, and by which GPCRs stimulate G proteins [2–6]. Our results suggest opportunities for the design of drugs that achieve greater specificity and control receptor signaling more precisely.
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayDecember 2017

    New Findings in Folate Homeostasis and Their Implications in Cancer Therapy

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    Time
    10:00 - 11:00
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Dr. Naama Kanarek
    Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge MA
    Organizer
    Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayDecember 2017

    Algebraic Geometry and Representation Theory Seminar

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    Time
    11:15 - 11:30
    Title
    Algebraic Families of Harish-Chandra Modules and their Application
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 290C
    Lecturer
    Eyal Subag
    Penn State University
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayDecember 2017

    Distinguished Lecturer

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:15
    Title
    Optimal Mass Transport and the Robustness of Complex Networks
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 1
    Lecturer
    Allen Tannenbaum
    Stony Brook University
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayDecember 2017

    Distinguished Lecturer

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    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Title
    Steady Water Waves
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 1
    Lecturer
    Walter Strauss
    Brown University
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The mathematical study of water waves became possible after ...»
    The mathematical study of water waves became possible after the derivation of the basic mathematical equations of fluids by Euler in 1752. Later, water waves, with a free boundary at the air interface, played a central role in the work of Poisson, Cauchy, Stokes, Levi-Civita and many others. It has seen greatly renewed interest among mathematicians in recent
    years.

    I will consider classical 2D traveling water waves with vorticity. By means of local and global bifurcation theory using topological degree, one can prove that there exist many such waves. They are exact smooth solutions of the Euler equations with the physical boundary conditions. Some of the waves are quite tall and steep and some are overhanging.
    There are periodic ones and solitary ones. I will also exhibit some numerical computations of such waves. Many fundamental problems remain open.
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayDecember 2017

    Scientific Council meeting

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    Time
    14:00 - 16:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Academic Events
  • Date:26TuesdayDecember 2017

    “Structure and mechanism of the two-component alpha-helical pore-forming toxin YaxAB”

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Dr. Bastian Braeuning
    Technische Universität München Munich, Bayern, Germany Join institution
    Organizer
    Department of Structural Biology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:26TuesdayDecember 2017

    "Structure & mechanism of the two-component pore-forming toxin YaxAB"

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Dov Elad Room
    Lecturer
    Dr. Bastian Braeuning
    Technical University of Munich Department of Chemistry
    Organizer
    Department of Structural Biology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:27WednesdayDecember 201728ThursdayDecember 2017

    ILSA Meeting

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Chairperson
    Michael Fainzilber
    Homepage
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:27WednesdayDecember 2017

    Neural activity imaging reveals computational principles in the neuromodulatory system

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    Time
    09:00
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Dr. Takashi Kawashima
    HHMI Janelia Research Campus, Ashburn, VA
    Organizer
    Department of Neurobiology
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Prof. Alon Chen alon.chen@weizmann.ac.il tel: 4490 F...»
    Host: Prof. Alon Chen alon.chen@weizmann.ac.il tel: 4490
    For assistance with accessibility issues, please contact naomi.moses@weizmann.ac.il

    Lecture
  • Date:27WednesdayDecember 2017

    Serotonin's roles in learning and decision-making

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    Time
    10:30
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Dr. Eran Lottem
    Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown, Lisbon
    Organizer
    Department of Neurobiology
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Prof. Alon Chen alon.chen@weizmann.ac.il tel: 4490 F...»
    Host: Prof. Alon Chen alon.chen@weizmann.ac.il tel: 4490
    For assistance with accessibility issues, please contact naomi.moses@weizmann.ac.il
    Lecture
  • Date:28ThursdayDecember 2017

    Magnetic Resonance Seminar

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    Time
    09:30
    Title
    From Lex's adiabatic pulses to phase-modulated saturation pulses:‎ pushing the limits of quadrupolar NMR
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Prof. Amir Goldbourt‎‎
    Tel Aviv University
    Organizer
    Department of Chemical and Biological Physics
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The periodic table is dominated by nuclei having a nuclear s...»
    The periodic table is dominated by nuclei having a nuclear spin larger than one-half, which possess a quadrupolar interaction, or spins having extensively large chemical shift anisotropies. The bottleneck in manipulating such spins is the low bandwidth, hence excitation efficiency, of conventional RF pulses. The demonstration of the spin locking mechanism in quadrupolar spins undergoing magic-angle spinning (A.J. Vega, JMR 96, 50, 1992) allowed the development of efficient quadrupolar-spin 1/2 distance measurements using sequences such as TRAPDOR and REAPDOR. Yet, adiabaticity fails for large quadrupolar couplings or at fast spinning rates, which are common in today's hardware, again due to insufficient RF power. Several developments to overcome this "sudden passage" limit have been proposed in recent years pushing the limit of nuclei that can be analyzed efficiently. I will discuss these advances, and show how our phase-modulated pulse approach provides complete randomization of all powder crystallites and consequently generates macroscopic spin saturation. As a result, distances to quadrupolar nuclei with extremely large couplings can be measured accurately and efficiently (up to frequencies of 10s of MHz), and reliable lifetimes of quadrupolar spins can be determined.
    Lecture
  • Date:28ThursdayDecember 2017

    TBA

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:30
    Location
    Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    TBA
    Organizer
    Faculty of Physics
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of 11:00 Coffee, Tea and more ...»
    11:00 Coffee, Tea and more
    AbstractShow full text abstract about TBA ...»
    TBA
    Colloquia

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